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  1. #551
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    Here's a Krampus from one of the Cycle Monkey crew, all set up for a trip to Mount Diablo. The 29+ platform is really the best option for offroad touring. No need for a suspension fork, which could be a nightmare if it breaks down in the backcountry!

    More photos here.

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-bikepackkrampus_wholebike_trail.jpg
    www.CycleMonkey.com
    Rohloff & Schlumpf gearing. Custom wheels. Suspension service.

  2. #552
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    Quote Originally Posted by CycleMonkey View Post
    Here's a Krampus from one of the Cycle Monkey crew, all set up for a trip to Mount Diablo. The 29+ platform is really the best option for offroad touring. No need for a suspension fork, which could be a nightmare if it breaks down in the backcountry!
    Seems like a fairly subjective claim. And I'd think youd have as much luck finding 29+ tires in the middle of nowhere as you would fork parts or service, or even standard 29 tires for the most part.

    Not to dog 29+, I like the idea but it dosn't strike me as the cover all solution as some make it out to be. Height, tire availability, wheel weight, and the limits it puts on gearing seem like issues most try to overlook.

  3. #553
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)



    My Troll built up for some dirt road exploration in Central Oregon.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #554
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    I'm getting everything ready for my first trip next month, so...

    Here's my rig; my Niner SIR 9 setup with a full complement of Revelate Designs bags. I converted the bike from a singlespeed to a 1x10 using a SRAM XO shifter, Type 2 rear derailleur, and 12-36 cassette, and a Race Face 30T narrow/wide ring.

    I'm still toying around with how I'm going to place all of my gear.

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-10325609_10204472886889077_8875733939190148157_n.jpg

  5. #555
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    posted wrong
    The Media is Legalized lying

  6. #556
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)

    Looks awesome Chris my garage door looks just like that too lol

  7. #557
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-g8azzd0.jpg
    Valhalla bound.

  8. #558
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_papa_nuts View Post
    Seems like a fairly subjective claim. And I'd think youd have as much luck finding 29+ tires in the middle of nowhere as you would fork parts or service, or even standard 29 tires for the most part.

    Not to dog 29+, I like the idea but it dosn't strike me as the cover all solution as some make it out to be. Height, tire availability, wheel weight, and the limits it puts on gearing seem like issues most try to overlook.
    Yes, there's no one solution that fits the needs of all adventure riders out there. 29+ is merely a new contender, and a good one for sure, in the line-up of expedition worthy bikes.

    If I find something to be absolutely kick-a$$, and itching to post about it on the Internet, I try to calm down and mention that said product is ideal for my unique needs. Then I briefly describe these needs and let the readers decide for themselves.

  9. #559
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    Here's my Motobecane Team Fly on the Kokopelli Trail. OMM Sherpa rear rack with Mountainsmith panniers. Generic compression stuff sack on the handlebars. My son has a similar setup. I chose panniers because:1. I have road touring experience and that's what I am familiar with, 2. I got a smoking deal on them, and 3. With 2 sets of panniers my wife and I can use them for road touring with the tandem.

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-img_20140519_105633.jpg

  10. #560
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)

    Here is my krampug in bikepacking mode...





    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  11. #561
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrollinAround View Post


    My Troll built up for some dirt road exploration in Central Oregon.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Now this on the other hand, has potential.
    Quote Originally Posted by biker_eric View Post
    Here is my krampug in bikepacking mode...





    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Took me a second to figure out what was going on there. That's a sweet rig.

  12. #562
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    How's the Krampug compare to a regular Krampus?
    www.julianbender.net

    Pictures of bike trips, hikes, and other travels

  13. #563
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbphilly View Post
    How's the Krampug compare to a regular Krampus?
    I have never ridden a krampus to compare between the two. I love how the krampug rides though. It handled very well loaded up, I was surprised how well it rode in the single track.


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  14. #564
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    My new race rig all ready for Tour Divide

    2014 Scott Spark 900SL

    35.88 lbs no food or water.

    Name:  maybike1 041.1.jpg
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    Edit- I lightened it up to 32.69 lbs no food or water!!!! A bikepack weapon!! Trail or Road watch out here I come!
    Name:  maybike2 008.1.jpg
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    Last edited by dream4est; 05-27-2014 at 06:27 PM.

  15. #565
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    Here's my Oregon Outback rig:
    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/sashax/14106046898" title="IMG_0615 by sasha magee, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2902/14106046898_bc2e8bf87f.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="IMG_0615"></a>
    Front is an Outdoor Research ultralight compression bag with sleeping bag, pad, rain jacket and puffy jacket. (Ultralight bag was, I think, a mistake. After 8 days on two trips it's already wearing out).
    Rear is Revelate Pika with bivvy, people clothes, extra food, stove/pot, pills/toothbrush, water purification pills.
    Jandd framebag is tools (multitool/leatherman), phone/charger, ride food.
    Not pictured: 3-liter Camelbak with water, flipflops, more food, first aid kit and tire fixing stuff.

    I ended up with too much food, and also more water capacity than I needed. I would have been better off with a 2-liter camelbak (although might have gotten a little dry, would have saved my @ss) and less food to keep weight off my back.

    It's not clear from the pic, but I was also running two feedbags. One for sweet food, one for savory. Love the combo.

    (Oh, bike as shown without water is 17kg).

  16. #566
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-14296671034_f5f9fae704_b.jpg

    Last weekend I got a frame bag as a birthday present from my lovely friends to kind of complete my rackless touring setup.
    I want to use this full setup the first time for a multi-day trip which is about to start the in about a week. To get myself into the mood for an adventure, I did some test packing today and I was (and still am) pretty impressed what I was able to attach to my Surly Krampus.
    The right side of the frame bag is stilly empty and reserved for a drinking bladder, some food, some electric stuff and tools.



    So here's what's already packed:

    Handlebar bag:

    Sleeping bag (Marmot Never Winter)

    Rainfly (MH Skyledge 3)

    (both inside)

    Sleeping pad (Thermarest NeoAir Trekker)

    Tent poles

    (both attached to the outside)



    Seat bag:

    3 Merino longsleeve shirts

    1 pair of shorts

    3 pairs of merino socks

    Underwear

    Hardshell jacket

    Washbag

    Thin fleece shirt



    Attached to the top:

    Footprint & stakes



    Frame bag:

    UL Windbreaker

    2 Buffs

    Sunglasses

    Legwarmers

  17. #567
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    Quote Originally Posted by woody.1 View Post
    Here's a pic of my rig. Everything, but my sleeping bag, which is getting cut down into a quilt. A few things in the seat bag will go into a front handlebar harness along with the quilt. I'm able to carry 6 liters of water with this setup.

    Woody
    Where did you get the frame bag

  18. #568
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    Salsa El Mariachi, set up for the GAP trail with slick tires, a rack and a giant Rivendell saddlebag. The fork is the steel version of Salsa's Firestarter fork.

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-dsc_8796.jpg

  19. #569
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    Summer setup for an overnighter. No water sources in this area so I carry everything. About 5l in the drom stashed in the frame bag as well as a 100ml camelback.

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-14516182824_f9147b8e50_z.jpg

    The Ride
    Salsa El Mar with Reba fork and Jones H-bar
    Stans ZTR Crest rims on I9 hubs and Nevegals (2.2)
    2X9 X9 Drivetrain
    Shimano SLX Hydro brakes
    ----------------------------------------
    On The Bars
    Sleeping
    Klymit Staic V pad
    SOL Escape Bivy over an REI summer down bag (45F)
    Tyvek ground cloth
    Usually take a tarp too but no rain this trip so I left at home

    Clothing
    Long undies
    Puffy jacket
    ----------------------------------------
    In the Pack
    Eating/Drinking
    Sesame noodles
    Granola
    Coffee (Starbucks Via FTW!)
    Tequila to send us off to sleep
    Homemade alcy stove and fuel for coffee
    ----------------------------------------
    Elsewhere on the Bike
    Tools and assorted knick knacks (paracord, hot pockets, bandanas, etc)
    First aid
    Energy food
    Light

    I use my iPhone for navigation along with printed maps (it mounts to the bars). I toggle among PDF Maps, Gaia and Cyclemeter depending on needs. Use a New Trent iCarrier charger to keep the phone juiced up. Good for at least 5 full charges. But with the requisite energy hog features turned off, I needed to recharge only once for this ride. Important to keep both devices from getting cold as it sucks the energy out of them.

  20. #570
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    Wink

    Just getting ready to head out on my first overnighter, hitting some old carriage roads in northern Maine. I went with panniers because I may be doing a crosscountry ride in September, where the storage would be necessary. I've never done this before, so there will need to be a bit of refining and getting things dialed in. I'm also short my bivy as it is back home in VA but, as is, it's:

    '14 Specialized AWOL (M)
    The bags out back are Axiom Typhoon Aero DLX waterproof @ 45 Liters - clothes, rain gear, food, everything else

    The frame case is a Specialized Vital, for energy bars/ipod/headphones

    Up front on the handlebars is a Camillus 3 day bug out bag thing that I scored @ Walmart. I just happened to spot it in the closeout section for $20. It has a Molle style mount that snaps perfectly around the handlebars, and it is narrow enough to not bug me at all. It came equipped with a basic first aid kit as well as 3 days of survival water/meal bars/poncho/handwarmer/space blanket/etc, and there were enough excess pockets to fill it out with all of my bike tools and spare parts.

    I'm afraid to weigh it.



    - H3

  21. #571
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    Seems like a lot of people are going rackless, whats the advantage of not having racks?
    "Never mistake motion for action."

    "If I can bicycle, I bicycle."

  22. #572
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    Lighter, narrower, and less chance of mechanical failures (broken bolts or racks).

  23. #573
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    New bike on the way, pics to follow.

    Salsa Ti Fargo frame
    Rohloff (38x16)
    Co-Motion Drop-Bar shifter for Rohloff
    Raceface crankset
    Chris King headset
    White Bro's Rock Solid carbon fork
    DT Swiss rims and spokes
    700x40c Vee Rubber XCX setup tubeless (for gravel)
    or
    29x2.0 Geax Saguaros tubeless (for this one race that starts in Canada)
    Brooks Ti Swift saddle
    Salsa Ti seatpost
    Avid BB7s
    Shimano M-540 SPD pedals

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-fargo.jpg

  24. #574
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_papa_nuts View Post
    Lighter, narrower, and less chance of mechanical failures (broken bolts or racks).
    +1 - definitely also:

    - gear weight centralized and lowered in frame bag for better handling
    - narrow bike means much much much easier pushing during steep singletrack hike-a-bike
    - less weight, better handling and less worry about breaking stuff means you can ride your bike like a mountain bike

    Having toured with both setups I'll never willingly go back to racks/panniers unless I absolutely must.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  25. #575
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    Makes sense. Id like to try a seat bag, what should I look for for my first one?
    "Never mistake motion for action."

    "If I can bicycle, I bicycle."

  26. #576
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    Re: Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)

    Iron Bridge , North Georgia.


  27. #577
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    Quote Originally Posted by L4NE4 View Post
    Makes sense. Id like to try a seat bag, what should I look for for my first one?
    Having seen a few seatbags up close from various companies and various cost ranges it's clear all seatbags are not created equal. It's also clear that you can fake a product photo so that your floppy seatbag looks awesome even if it works like a POS on the trail.

    I know someone who makes seatbags [Scott @ Porcelain Rocket] so I use those ones and they are great, but they are not a low cost option.

    I would stick with a major brand that you can find a bunch of positive reviews for the bag you plan to buy.

    Making a high quality bag that performs well with a load is not a trivial task so you want to get a bag made by someone who actually bikepacks and who has worked out the bugs in their products with a few generations of prototypes.

    All that to say just beware killer deals on bag shaped objects that may not meet your expectations. It won't be much of a deal when you have to buy a second bag on top of the cost of the first.

    Aside from the function the fabric and stitching details vary widely. There are quite a few bags being offered that look like $hit. Whether that matters to you or not is a personal thing.

    I appreciate a quality product made by someone with skills.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  28. #578
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    I took this on the Great Allegheney Passage ride from Pittsburgh, PA to Cumberland, MD (150 miles). The frame bag was made 100% out of duct tape and had tie-outs for knotting to the frame. I literally just hung a giant lunchbox over the front of my handlebar and had it wrapped to the steerer tube. Lastly, I had a rear rack I bought at Wal-Mart. I discovered I was missing some pieces to it, but have it ratchet strapped to my seat with two backpacks in between. First time ever bike packing, but I'm excited to do it again!

  29. #579
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)


    My Salsa Mukluk, custom front rack for my sleeping bag and tent, Revelate bags for the rest. Just completed a four day 350 mile tour of the California Lost Coast. Everything worked flawless.

  30. #580
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    +1 - definitely also:

    - gear weight centralized and lowered in frame bag for better handling
    - narrow bike means much much much easier pushing during steep singletrack hike-a-bike
    - less weight, better handling and less worry about breaking stuff means you can ride your bike like a mountain bike

    Having toured with both setups I'll never willingly go back to racks/panniers unless I absolutely must.
    It will also fit in a bike box easier . See y'all in a month.

  31. #581
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    Rig from my bikepacking trip to Assateague Island, not technically mine, demo from the shop I work at, but I have a 2015 on order.
    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-10514083_508102969335527_1544874507_n.jpg
    "...when I stand to climb I'm like the Hulk rowing the USS Badass up the Kickass River."
    -michaelscott

  32. #582
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)

    Ooo say hi to the ponies for me. I need to go back. After seeing a lot of these frame bags I am tempted to make my own. I'm sure there must be a sewing pattern out there.

  33. #583
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    update on my rig, salsa fargo gen2.

    yard sale by mbeganyi, on Flickr

    thats not a moon by mbeganyi, on Flickr

    finally have my water in the frame bag, used a sawyer mini this weekend and like it... mounted inline to my hydro hose on the bars.

    IMG_3162 by mbeganyi, on Flickr

  34. #584
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    Re: Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)

    Quote Originally Posted by bmike View Post
    update on my rig, salsa fargo gen2.
    Great job! Very efficient setup, I like your ideas. The retractable hose reel and the Sawyer on the bladder. Cockpit extender is well utilized too, everything seems well thought out and solid.

    Would love to see a complete gear list. Thanks



    Posted w/ Tapatalk via Android

  35. #585
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    Quote Originally Posted by ridemtn View Post
    Great job! Very efficient setup, I like your ideas. The retractable hose reel and the Sawyer on the bladder. Cockpit extender is well utilized too, everything seems well thought out and solid.

    Would love to see a complete gear list. Thanks
    thanks... partial list, pulled from notes from previous trips. it all changes, depending on the season, mood, etc. (a slightly heavier setup with rain gear, cold gear and a change of clothes i feel could work for a much longer trip... once you have enough gear for a 2-3 day trip, it doesn't take much to go longer (assuming resupply, etc.)

    Personal:
    Glasses
    Contact Case
    Sunglasses
    Maps / Cue cards
    Phone
    Wallet
    Knife

    Electronics:
    Spot
    GPS
    Camera
    Batteries (can now top off a battery or run the GPS from my dyno hub)
    Headlamp and / or Fenix flashlight and helmet mount

    Meds:
    Eye drops
    Contact Solution
    Tums
    Ibuprofen
    Zyrtec (allergy)
    TP
    Shovel
    Wipes
    Lantiseptic
    Hand sanitizer (in feed bag mesh pocket for easy use!)

    Cook Kit:
    Gigapower Stove
    Ti Pot
    Ti Mug (if luxury camping)
    Bear bag with line
    Spork

    Food:
    Varies per season, trip. Split up between tail bag and feed bags on bars

    Hydration (in frame bag)
    Platy Bladder
    Sawyer Mini inline
    Aqua Mira drops (in with medical stuff)
    Spare bottle, if needed for refill / electrolyte (on fork, or frame, if needed)

    Shelter (in rear bag, or on frame)
    TarpTent Contrail
    Pole
    Stakes

    Sleep (in front harness)
    Big Agnes FishHawk 30d Down Sleeping bag
    Big Agnes insulated air core pad

    Bike Mech (in jerry can and in frame bag
    Tube
    Patch kit
    Tire boot
    Pump
    Multitool (w/ pliers)
    Multitool (bike, with chain tool
    Derailler hanger
    Brake pads (1 set)
    Zip ties
    Electrical tape
    Chain Lube
    Brake / Shifter Cable
    Chain link

    Clothes: (destination / weather dependent, in tail bag or frequently used items in Wingnut pack, if used)
    Boxers
    Woolie
    T-shirt
    MUSA pants
    Cycling Vest
    Arm warmers
    Cycling gloves
    Rain jacket
    Headnet if req'd
    Spare socks if wet / cold

  36. #586
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Cobb View Post

    My Salsa Mukluk, custom front rack for my sleeping bag and tent, Revelate bags for the rest. Just completed a four day 350 mile tour of the California Lost Coast. Everything worked flawless.
    were you at standish-hickey around the 1st of august? i think we may have met as you were rolling out of camp...

  37. #587
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    Quote Originally Posted by modbog View Post
    were you at standish-hickey around the 1st of august? i think we may have met as you were rolling out of camp...
    That wouldn't have been me, I was west of Standish Hickey on Usal road and hwy 1 on the 5th. We weren't too far off though.

  38. #588
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-image.jpg

    Playing around with set-up for an overnighter. Gravel, doubletrack and pavement. Just need to figure the water carrying part out.

  39. #589
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    I might just say use a light camelbak since you are carrying all your gear in the packs no need to put more of it in your back.
    Mr. Krabs: Is it true, Squidward? Is it hilarious?

  40. #590
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    Quote Originally Posted by lextek View Post
    Attachment 921430

    Playing around with a set-up for first overnighter. Just need to get the water storage figured out.


    Using hose clamps you can get .7L on the stem at easy reach and 1.5L-2L on the DT for long stretches without water.

    Works great and easily removable when you are not on tour.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  41. #591
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    A more elegant solution for a bottle on the stem is the King Cage top cap mount. It's worked great for me, although when possible I prefer not having it mounted.
    www.julianbender.net

    Pictures of bike trips, hikes, and other travels

  42. #592
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    Stem space is taken up by a Garmin now. I mounted the second cage on the seat tube. Would need side entry cages for it to work better. Put a small soft bottle in the frame bag. Maybe another soft bottle in the seat bag or look at mounting something on the fork.

  43. #593
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    Quote Originally Posted by lextek View Post
    Stem space is taken up by a Garmin now. I mounted the second cage on the seat tube. Would need side entry cages for it to work better. Put a small soft bottle in the frame bag. Maybe another soft bottle in the seat bag or look at mounting something on the fork.
    get a bladder in there. run a hose to the front, use an ID badge reel, or get one of the dedicated ones from Showers Pass... I can get a 70oz in my Tangle on my IndyFab, and a larger one on my Fargo.

    Untitled by mbeganyi, on Flickr

    by mbeganyi, on Flickr

    cockpit on the fargo by mbeganyi, on Flickr

  44. #594
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    This is my full ride set-up. I move the sleeping pad to the bottom of my pack when riding.
    <a href="http://s1059.photobucket.com/user/Clayton764/media/Xterra/banderabike_zps28133158.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i1059.photobucket.com/albums/t434/Clayton764/Xterra/banderabike_zps28133158.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo banderabike_zps28133158.jpg"/></a>


    Once I get to the site and set up camp, I strip the gear down to this, and proceed to ride!
    <a href="http://s1059.photobucket.com/user/Clayton764/media/Xterra/banderabike1_zpse3fee36a.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i1059.photobucket.com/albums/t434/Clayton764/Xterra/banderabike1_zpse3fee36a.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo banderabike1_zpse3fee36a.jpg"/></a>

  45. #595
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    Couldn't figure out how to delete a messed up post... so I'm just changing it to "Hi... everyone have a great night"

  46. #596
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    I carry a 64oz insulated growler below the down tube on my ECR and Krampus. The 29+ has just enough Q for the cranks to slip by and the weight is nice and low. The orange straps are called Pronghorn straps and one is more than enough in consort with a TwoFish velcro-on growler cage.


  47. #597
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    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-image-9-.jpg

  48. #598
    ballbuster
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    Dec 2003
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    12,702
    Access 29er with pannier racks, cheapo bags. I built this bike almost entirely from the parts bin. I think I only bought a new chain and Avid BB7 brakes and new shifter and brake cables.

    I'm using a Planet Bike KOKO rear pannier rack that I had to modify to fit over the brake caliper. It's a cheap rack, but it was the beefiest thing I could find without spending real money. I expect it will show cracks at some point. When that happens, if I ride it enough for that to happen, I'll invest in a better rack.


    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/g-hRmQFaQu3xvYiPb1X9DXZksl5HADvuEk0fD796wco?feat=emb edwebsite"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-_82dMy1B_0E/VAPIX6OtMzI/AAAAAAAA8UI/lm4ge-PIpHg/s800/IMG_5952.JPG" height="600" width="800" /></a>

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/a249iafZJ5ktHcqNMnHkDnZksl5HADvuEk0fD796wco?feat=e mbedwebsite"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-hZTbZIXnZQw/VAPIReu1M3I/AAAAAAAA8Tw/UJ4ANEV6ES8/s800/IMG_5949.JPG" height="600" width="800" /></a>

    Currently, I'm only doing overnighters, but I expect to expand as I get a better idea of what I'm doing.

    That fork is a Reba that somebody on MTBR gave me because it was leaking air. I replaced the air o-ring seals, and it still leaked. The walls of the air chamber must have been scored or something. So, I converted it to a coil spring. Perfect for this. At least now if anything fails, it will still be rideable... unless the coil breaks, which is very unlikely. Anyway, Reba with coil spring is crazy plush... perfect for this. Lockout still works, although the damper side of the fork leaks oil out of the top. It's fine as long as I don't store the bike upside down. Not bad for only $60 invested.
    Last edited by pimpbot; 09-12-2014 at 04:00 PM.

  49. #599
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    Chilcotins Set Up August 2014

    My set up from a 4 day trip in the Chilcotins this past August long weekend. I made the bike bags.
    Fun times in fun places.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-adam-chilcotins-set-up-august-2014.jpg  

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-chilcotins-shaka-bruh.jpg  


  50. #600
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    This is my Surly LHT Deluxe w/S&S couplers. Taking it to Asia

    Post your Bikepacking Rig (and gear layout!)-bike.jpg

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