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  1. #51
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    I am running the same shoes as Vik posted, the Freerider Elements. I use a Louis Garneau shoe cover, the same as I use for Hi-Impacts and trail runners. With the shoe covers I can get my Hi-Impacts to stay dry for hours riding or shoveling snow (I do have the Impacts sprayed with waterproofer as well- helps tons).

    So far, no real world data. I was hoping the Freerider Elements could work better in long-term hike-a-bike conditions, like AZT750 or CTR. Hi-Impacts suck at that- they only work well for short term day hiking IMO.

    Pedals are Black Ops Nylo-Pro. I was using trail runners but on my third big ride last year I developed knee pain. I think I wear out the trail runners and they flex too much- or something. I wasnt getting proper grip and drive like with Hi-Impacts so I am back to 5.10. I hope this works I dont want to ride clipless anymore.

  2. #52
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    I've also settled on the Freeriders (though not the Elements). I've put some pretty good mileage on them and a few extended rides 5+ hours and they were super comfy. I think they hike a bike just fine too.

    Vik, let us know how the Elements hold up. I'm interested in a pair for the Colorado Trail.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by sherpaxc View Post
    Vik, let us know how the Elements hold up. I'm interested in a pair for the Colorado Trail.
    Will do. I had a pair of Freeriders start to fall apart on me after 5 rides last summer:

    vikapproved | Five Ten Freerider VXi Review

    But I have had amazing service from my 5.10 Impact Low shoes so I'm going to chalk that up to a mistake during fabrication.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  4. #54
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    Well my Freerider Elements worked well in the azt750 but they failed in the Grand Canyon after about 6 miles. By fail I mean they went soft and all ground punishment was transferred to the feet.

    For the first 650 miles they were awesome. Great pedaling efficiency and comfy hikeabike even on nasty stuff like Oracle Ridge and Highline Trail.
    I would use them again in CTR or AZT750 but I wouldnt try a canyon hike in them again.
    They seem to have about a 500-600 mile life for hard bikepacking use IMO.

  5. #55
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    I know this is a serious bring back from the dead bump but I am interested in the current thinking/suggestions for flat pedals and shoes for bikepacking. Having just read a post over at Bikepacking.com and working towards a minimal load hence no camp/town shoes to be carried I am seriously considering moving from clipless to flat for bikepacking.

    If you are using flat pedals, I would value your thoughts and suggestions on pedals and shoes. Also what do you think of the suggestions in the blog post linked to above?

    Thanks
    Andrew

  6. #56
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    ^I use 5.10 Freeriders and Wellgo MG-1s. If I loosen the laces all the way they make comfy camp slippers, another bonus is good grip on rock. The pedals in the blog post are good, although for touring/packing I don't like the real aggressive pin setups.
    I ride with the best people.




  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    ^I use 5.10 Freeriders and Wellgo MG-1s. If I loosen the laces all the way they make comfy camp slippers, another bonus is good grip on rock. The pedals in the blog post are good, although for touring/packing I don't like the real aggressive pin setups.
    Thank you for your comment and suggestion. If I may ask a dumb question from the perspective of no flat pedal experience, what is the role/effect of pin setups, such as the more aggressive ones found on the pedals in the blog post?

    I have taken a read of this blog post at BetterRide.net where the writer states:

    Short pedal pins allow for an easier removal of the foot from the pedal and they don’t mess up your shins quite as bad WHEN you rake them across your legs. Often BMX riders will ride short pins and also fewer pins because they need to remove their feet from the pedals, slide them around and re-adjust, or just plain get off of the bike in a hurry (eject). Ever see a hard-core BMXer’s shins? Not pretty …

    Nice long pedal pins keep your feet in place. With long pins and a good shoe (discussed below) your foot is pretty much locked in. There’s no siding around or re-adjusting. Your foot is planted on the pedal and it won’t move unless you get all of your weight up and off of the pedal. Yes, they do a number on any type of soft fleshy tissue that they come in contact with, but the chances of “slipping” a pedal with a proper shoe and a proper pedal with long pins is drastically limited. Kinda like you stand a better chance of cutting yourself if you use a dull knife rather then a sharp one (?).
    Is this a fair summary on the subject of pins?

    Thanks

  8. #58
    saddlemeat
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    ^Yes. I don't normally ride very aggressively when bikepacking, so I'm not real concerned about losing the pedals. I have only about an 1/8" of the pins showing on my MG-1s, plenty for good grip but easier to change foot position, and not as sharky-bitey when pushing the bike. I like clipless pedals too, but the shoes aren't very suitable for some aspects of bikepacking, like hiking,scrambling on rock, or lounging in camp.
    I ride with the best people.




  9. #59
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    I did a ride today where my front wheel slipped on a tight turn in loose dirt, and I was able to immediately bail off the bike and roll out of it. Pretty glad to be running flats on that one.

    In any case, I wanted to mention that the La Sportiva Boulder X approach shoes also have good, grippy rubber, so that's another option. I found that the five ten shoes just don't fit my feet at all, so it's nice to have an alternative. I've also backpacked about 200 miles in the Grand Canyon on a pair of Boulder X's (off-trail, no less), so they might hold up better than the Elements from the sound of it.
    Nick Smolinske - Owner/Operator at Rogue Panda Designs
    www.roguepanda.com

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aushiker View Post
    Thank you for your comment and suggestion. If I may ask a dumb question from the perspective of no flat pedal experience, what is the role/effect of pin setups, such as the more aggressive ones found on the pedals in the blog post?

    I have taken a read of this blog post at BetterRide.net where the writer states:



    Is this a fair summary on the subject of pins?

    Thanks
    I think that a fair summary of using flats for fairly intense riding. I think for most bikepacking you would be hard pressed to be dealing with that level of riding intensity for much of the riding. I would guess that the Colorado Trail would qualify. I've got full on aggressive pins on my flats, Canfield Brothers Ultimate Crampons, and I really think they are the way to go for intense riding. For most bikepacking though I think you could run way less aggressive pins and be fine. I would just use my pedals for trips since that is what I have. But actually if there was going to be lots of hike-a-bike I might switch to a less aggressive pedal as I have cut myself the most with my pedals when I was off the bike pushing it around.

    I have several bikes with clipless pedals and I have a pair of Shimano MTB touring shoes that I wouldn't hesitate to use for bikepacking with those bikes. They're comfortable to just wear around and their only weakness is if you are walking on rounded rocks the cleats hit the rocks.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    ^Yes. I don't normally ride very aggressively when bikepacking, so I'm not real concerned about losing the pedals. I have only about an 1/8" of the pins showing on my MG-1s, plenty for good grip but easier to change foot position, and not as sharky-bitey when pushing the bike. I like clipless pedals too, but the shoes aren't very suitable for some aspects of bikepacking, like hiking,scrambling on rock, or lounging in camp.
    Thanks. Much appreciated.

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