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  1. #1
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    The most comfy post

    HA, puns.

    Anyways, I have been considering getting a TI post for my BP rig but came across the Velonews test and it has made me think otherwise. What's been everybody's experince with various seatposts comfort wise?

    I wanna stay away from carbon and need a 400mm.

  2. #2
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    I am not sure that a low amplitude high frequency road type vibration test is very relevant to any offroad riding, any of those passive damping techniques used on roadie posts are not likely to work too well on even small offroad hits - it's not what they are designed for. I've used a Cane Creek Thudbuster for touring / Bike packing for years, it is significantly more comfortable than any rigid post I've used. Only downside is the cost.

  3. #3
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    not the only downside...they are heavy as hell. I still run one on my mixed terrain bikepacking rig with a Brooks B17N. a fully broken in, well fitting Brooks on a thudbuster is a wonderful thing but it's such a heavy combo, it's almost not worth it.
    "...when I stand to climb I'm like the Hulk rowing the USS Badass up the Kickass River."
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  4. #4
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    I should mention that the main reason I ask is I recently registered for a thousand mile gravel road race. I'm gonna use my bikepacking rig because it fits so well and I have bags but plan to use skinny(er) tires and want to compensate for comforts sake. Although the added comfort factor would be nice on true bikepacking trips.

    I was actually considering the Thudbuster but worry about the reliability.

  5. #5
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    a Thomson Masterpiece is worth looking into if you want simple reliable and comfortable. Though it's an allot post, it's machined in such a way to give enough to compliance to make it really comfortable. It's lighter than a lot of high end carbon posts and it has a bomb proof saddle clamp system, and it easy to micro adjust saddle angle.

    Overall, for a 1000 mile gravel ride, I think your saddle choice is going to be way more important than the post though, If you have that dialled, just about any post is going to work out for you.
    "...when I stand to climb I'm like the Hulk rowing the USS Badass up the Kickass River."
    -michaelscott

  6. #6
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    Bike racing of any sort and comfort are mutually exclusive in my experience. Any lightweight metal post is going to have very limited damping properties i would imagine.
    Agree that saddle choice is more important

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by SimpleJon View Post
    Bike racing of any sort and comfort are mutually exclusive in my experience. Any lightweight metal post is going to have very limited damping properties i would imagine.
    Agreed, but it shouldn't be your gear that's putting the hurt on you. Any dampening that's going to come from a seatpost, aside from a suspension type design, is probably going to be negligible compared to choice of tires, air pressure, frame design, etc.
    "...when I stand to climb I'm like the Hulk rowing the USS Badass up the Kickass River."
    -michaelscott

  8. #8
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    What's the difference in non carbon posts?
    Wouldn't they all be about the same in terms of "comfort"?

  9. #9
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    I would think so, i think even the 'magical' damping properties of carbon will be very limited in this situation. As previously said saddle choice tire pressure and physical preparation are probably the much more important

  10. #10
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    A set back vs straight and a more or less solid clamp is about the only real diff.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk

  11. #11
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    No, the wall thickness of the post, design of the internal cavity and specific alloy used are all going to play into how the post feels. High end alloy posts do not have the same wall thickness all the way around to allow for compliance while remaining strong and durable. A titanium post is going to feel different from an alloy post, just like a titanium frame feels different from an alloy frame.
    "...when I stand to climb I'm like the Hulk rowing the USS Badass up the Kickass River."
    -michaelscott

  12. #12
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    Isn't reduced wall thickness / bore machining there to reduce weight whilst maintaining strength rather than improve comfort / damping. In that article the Thomson seat post proved one of the worst! but as I said I am not sure roadie tests are really relevant here.
    Personally I've not had any issues with thudbuster reliability and I am not too bothered about a little bit of extra weight if I am carting water and bike packing equipment. An active suspension system is going to be more comfortable than a rigid post on a hardtail - I've never raced or timed myself bike packing / touring so I'm not sure whether it will reduce your pedalling efficiency or timing.

  13. #13
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    When I switched to a carbon post I grams lightness was great however mostly I noticed that when taking drops where my butt hit the seat (no dropper post) the carbon post took the ouch out of the hit. It was like landing on a rubber mallet vs ballhammer.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk

  14. #14
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    Hey just get a dropper like the KS eten for $100 bucks and forget the debate!

  15. #15
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    I don't think that test is totally relevant to bikepacking. I think the vibration damping has no relevance at all, but the amount of flex does. There are just to many factors involved with seatpost comfort:

    Material
    Design
    setback
    diameter
    exposed post length

    In my experience, the one that makes the most difference is the one you can't change (without changing frames), the amount of exposed seatpost. The more post exposed, the more it will flex, no matter what the other variables are. My choice on all my bikes: Titanium 27.2mm. I have various brands, most bought used on ebay. I have swapped them between bikes and really can't tell a difference between them on the same bike, but surely notice the difference of the same post on different bikes!

  16. #16
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    I'm lucky in that respect as the 400mm post I have in there is near its max. I may just order a ST Thudbuster to try. It's actually cheaper then the Ti posts I was looking at, and I should be able to resell without a problem given the novelty factor.

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    -a thousand mile gravel road race.- what/where?

    I've used loads of posts and broken/bent a fair few.. the most comfy/flexy by a good margin was a Van Nic ti layback, but it's not the strongest either. I took it off one of my bikes as the flex felt excessive for an already-comfy bike and it now seems to have a minor bend in it, only a fraction though. A Syntace P6 feels quite flexible, and my Eriksen ti feels almost as stiff as the Thomson but is also one of the most likely 'lifetime of use' products I've put on a bike. I'm 183cm / 73kg fwiw.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_papa_nuts View Post
    I'm lucky in that respect as the 400mm post I have in there is near its max. I may just order a ST Thudbuster to try. It's actually cheaper then the Ti posts I was looking at, and I should be able to resell without a problem given the novelty factor.
    I have no experience with them, but for what seems like a reasonable price, you might consider a Budnitz if you are looking for 27.2

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_papa_nuts View Post
    HA, puns.

    Anyways, I have been considering getting a TI post for my BP rig but came across the Velonews test and it has made me think otherwise. What's been everybody's experince with various seatposts comfort wise?

    I wanna stay away from carbon and need a 400mm.
    I ride whatever AL post I can get my hands on...never really paid attention to the stiffness of the post. I do ride a Brooks saddle and bigger tires on a steel frame though so maybe with that combo it doesn't matter much. I can ride 12hrs+ a day in total comfort without bike shorts or any lotions/potions on my junk.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomz View Post
    I have no experience with them, but for what seems like a reasonable price, you might consider a Budnitz if you are looking for 27.2
    I actually have one of those posts, the layback version. I don't know who makes it for them, but it's a really nice post, especially considering the price. I also have an old style Moots and an old Airborne Ti post. All layback and 27.2. I can't tell the difference between them when riding, they all provide a bit of 'give' for the big hits. The Airborne is going on the bikepacking rig I'm building up right now, the Budnitz is on my Blacksheep singlespeed, and the Moots is on the Gnarvester. Oh yeah, I also have a Dean Ti straight post on my road bike, but there's not much exposed post on that, so it probably doesn't do much (except match the frame material!).

    Yes, I have a problem...

    Mark

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_papa_nuts View Post
    I was actually considering the Thudbuster but worry about the reliability.
    I've have several years of use on my ST Thudbuster and it's been as reliable as dirt so far, about the only maintenance has been replacing the elastomer once. It does have a small amount of side play but I don't notice it while riding. Well designed and built IMO.

  22. #22
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    I had wondered about the Thud buster too but found squishy tubeless tires filled the bill. If that didn't work I would have bought the ThudBuster. It's not a rear suspension dwlink but it's better than nothing for sensitive or injured people.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by james-o View Post
    -a thousand mile gravel road race.- what/where?

    I've used loads of posts and broken/bent a fair few.. the most comfy/flexy by a good margin was a Van Nic ti layback, but it's not the strongest either. I took it off one of my bikes as the flex felt excessive for an already-comfy bike and it now seems to have a minor bend in it, only a fraction though. A Syntace P6 feels quite flexible, and my Eriksen ti feels almost as stiff as the Thomson but is also one of the most likely 'lifetime of use' products I've put on a bike. I'm 183cm / 73kg fwiw.
    Race Across Texas.

    Quote Originally Posted by kustomz View Post
    I have no experience with them, but for what seems like a reasonable price, you might consider a Budnitz if you are looking for 27.2
    I looked at those but they seem to come with either too much or to little setback.
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I've have several years of use on my ST Thudbuster and it's been as reliable as dirt so far, about the only maintenance has been replacing the elastomer once. It does have a small amount of side play but I don't notice it while riding. Well designed and built IMO.
    I've been doing some research an it looks like they have really refined their design. All the negitive reviews I found were either old or involved a BIG guys. I'd still like something simplier but might give it a try based on price.

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