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  1. #1
    Nice day for a ride.....
    Reputation: Bikin' Bric's Avatar
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    Frame Bag for Everyday Riding???

    Hi,

    I did some google searching and came up empty handed. Thought I'd ask here. I'm looking at replacing my camelbak with a small frame bag like the Relevate Tangle to hold everything I would normally carry in my backpack. How many people here use a frame bag opposed to a camelbak for everyday mountain biking? Think 2-3 hour singletrack rides. Should I be stuffing a hydration bladder in the bag or am I better off with bottles? Pros / Cons of this setup?
    I'd like to get the weight off my back.

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Jstews's Avatar
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    I rode primarily with full frame bag all last season, and I intend to do the same this year. I most often just tuck a bottle in the frame bag, along with the usual backpack suspects, tools, snacks, a shell, etc. I prefer to have nothing on my back. I don't see why you couldn't throw a bladder in there, and then run a hose through the slot that most frame bags seem to feature if the bladder is your preference.

  3. #3
    Did I catch a niner?
    Reputation: Mr Pink57's Avatar
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    I use a M Revelate Tangle Bag everyday. Another option is a Jandd frame bag or a Banjo Bros.
    Mr. Krabs: Is it true, Squidward? Is it hilarious?
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  4. #4
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    I absolutely do this. My Bridgestone, which is my commuter and general purpose bike, has a full frame bag; I hose clamped a bottle cage to the stem. My El Mariachi has a 3/4 frame bag so I can use the seat tube cage mounts for a bottle. Running the full frame bag all the time on the Bridgestone convinced me I'm never going without a frame bag again. It's both comfortable and convenient.
    1989 Bridgestone mb-3
    2013 Salsa El Mariachi 2

  5. #5
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    I run a frame bag on my BP rig, commuter, and gravel bike and love them all. I use them to carry bladders when I need and it works great. That being said I don't think I would want 10 pound extra weight strapped to my fun bike. I'd either use a couple bottles and a saddle bag, or a minimalist hydration pack.

  6. #6
    seedub
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    I concur. I started out with a tangle bag, worked great, still works great on my commuter road bike. Moved up to full frame bag for my Krampus. The bag really weighs next to nothing, throw a bottle in it plus all the crap for self sufficiency like pumps, tube, tool, bars. Nothing on my back and I hope to not have anything on my back. I really like it. Keeps the CG down low and my back cool.
    you may have come before us on no bicycle, but that does not say you know everything.

  7. #7
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    relevate tangle with 100oz bladder in one side and snacks/tools/parts/jacket in the other. can do 8hr rides without having to wear a pack on my back.

    Frame Bag for Everyday Riding???-swift.jpg

    its a taint saver since pack weight is that much more pressure on the seat.

  8. #8
    Nice day for a ride.....
    Reputation: Bikin' Bric's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies. Lots of good info here.

    honkonbobo, what size of Tangle are you running in that pic? With the bladder is there enough room to stuff some winter riding gear in as well?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikin' Bric View Post
    honkonbobo, what size of Tangle are you running in that pic? With the bladder is there enough room to stuff some winter riding gear in as well?
    XL singular swift frame and L tangle bag. i haven't needed to really jam it full but with the full 100oz bladder i can still fit some narrow things like a mini pump/food etc and then on the other side some tightly rolled clothing like warmers/jacket/extra gloves.

    the single tangle bag i have is everything i need for super long day rides in reasonable weather without having to wear a pack. once you start talking overnight or crazy weather you are probably gonna need something more. also if your frame takes the S or M tangle you are gonna lose a little space to what i have here as well.

  10. #10
    I'm attracted to Gravity!
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    My frame bags never come off - short rides, long rides, overnights, whatever.

    The commuter bike and mountain bike frame bags are both permanently loaded with tools, pump, and tubes. Then I can add whatever else I need for that ride. Really convenient, plus that way I don't have to wrestle velcro very often.

  11. #11
    Cycle Psycho
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    I run a framebag that lives in the bike, and the only con for me is carrying the bike up stairs or over larger logs and such. Can't really "shoulder" the bike, and I miss being able to carry it by its top-tube. I've seen some people rig a strap above the top-tube for carrying, but I haven't figured out a good way to do this yet. It's also more awkward to lift the bike up into the workstand.

    One other caveat is when I'm wearing baggy shorts. The shorts hit the bag and make a constant noise while pedaling - and also when standing up. I feel like eventually it will wear down the bag and/or shorts - but that would probably take a very long time.
    '10 Rocky Mountain Metropolis (rigid 2x10)
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  12. #12
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    To carry a bike with a full frame bag, pick it up by the chainstay. Even with the flat top tube of the Bridgestone, it's an easy reach. The seat on my bikes is then right above my shoulder by my ear. Easy peasy and gentler on my bony shoulders.
    1989 Bridgestone mb-3
    2013 Salsa El Mariachi 2

  13. #13
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    Lift it by the down tube and hook the seat on your sholder. You can also leave a bit of slack near the top rear so you can still slip you hand under the top tube.

  14. #14
    Cycle Psycho
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefFlatFootNoBeard View Post
    To carry a bike with a full frame bag, pick it up by the chainstay. Even with the flat top tube of the Bridgestone, it's an easy reach. The seat on my bikes is then right above my shoulder by my ear. Easy peasy and gentler on my bony shoulders.
    Thanks for this. Seems obvious after you wrote it, but I never even considered it before. I just did your technique with a different bike up some stairs, just to try it out (no frame bagged bike), and it made the bike the perfect height to clear the stairs (stairs are narrow with 180 degree bend halfway). The easiest it's ever been, thank you for the advice! I used to have to "flex my bicep" to carry it by the top tube, to not hit the overhang with my saddle, but your way made it so my arm could be more relaxed, almost just straight down by my side. I feel so stupid for doing so wrong for so long!

    Quote Originally Posted by big_papa_nuts View Post
    Lift it by the down tube and hook the seat on your sholder. You can also leave a bit of slack near the top rear so you can still slip you hand under the top tube.
    I'll try your way next, big_papa_nuts, but my brooks saddle doesn't look like it would be comfortable on my shoulder, with its big_saddle_nut right there in the front. My down tube is at a pretty extreme angle too. My revelate bag fits so perfectly to the troll, that I'd hate to mess with trying to leave space between it and the top tube.
    '10 Rocky Mountain Metropolis (rigid 2x10)
    '10 SURLY 1x1 (rigid SS)
    '13 SURLY Ogre (rigid SS)
    '13 SURLY Troll (rigid 2x10)

  15. #15
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    Works better when weraing a backpack cuz the strap will act as padding, but you can carry most of the weight with your hand.

    And you don't have to leave room above your bag, just loosen the straps enough to slide your hand in. Think of it like a helmet strap, where you can still slide your fingers under your chin.

  16. #16
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    I forget where I learned that technique, definitely didn't think of it my own, but yeah, it's great. Seems like I could carry a bike longer that way since my arm is pretty straight.
    1989 Bridgestone mb-3
    2013 Salsa El Mariachi 2

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gritter View Post
    It's also more awkward to lift the bike up into the workstand.
    This seems like one of those things I'm always relearning but if you just unzip the bag you can lift from under the top tube almost as if it weren't there.

  18. #18
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    Wondering if the Tangle back make contact with your legs when pedaling? I tend to pedal slightly, knock kneed.

  19. #19
    saddlemeat
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    Quote Originally Posted by lextek View Post
    Wondering if the Tangle back make contact with your legs when pedaling? I tend to pedal slightly, knock kneed.
    Me too, but it has not been a problem. I mountain bike with a 100 oz. Camelbak bladder plus tools, tubes, pump, rain shell, etc. so it's pretty full.
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  20. #20
    saddlemeat
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    This is my setup. The hose comes out the main zipper for ease of filling the bladder.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Frame Bag for Everyday Riding???-dscn6057-copy.jpg  

    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  21. #21
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    I use a Deuter Triangle bag mounted backwards. It contains spare tube, 2 CO2 cartidges, patch kit, mutlitool, tire patch kit and a couple fo tie wraps. There is still a lot of free space.

    Frame Bag for Everyday Riding???-20140714_073054.jpg

    Front Triangle Bag - Bike Accessories -Accessories - Deuter Sport GmbH - Deutschland

    For short rides, I also don't like wearing a back pack so I have a Deuter belt bag with water bottle holder.


    Pulse Two - Sport Hip Belt -Accessories - Deuter Sport GmbH - Deutschland

  22. #22
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    I have all the Revelate bags and love them. But, for a lighterweight everyday frame bag I use a Porta-Pack Wedge. Love it. At $28 its a steal of a deal. The zipper is on the right side and I can still access my water bottle.

    Porta-Pack: Sport Rack Pack, Bike Storage Pack. Providing storage traditional packs do not, water resistant and made from heavy duty Cordura. Made in the USA.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Frame Bag for Everyday Riding???-103fz1j.jpg  


  23. #23
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    I have been using a frame bag for regular riding of late simply because I was too lazy to wrestle with all that Velcro following my last bikepacking trip. But I love it! I easily fit everything I need (100oz water bladder, tools and tube. Hell, I could fit a decent sized picnic for two in there) And the bag itself is really not very heavy at all. I also have hefted the bike as some have described (hand down on the chain stays, saddle on the shoulder) or just undone enough Velcro to get my arm through the triangle. The only thing I will say is that the bike is heavier with the water in there.

    I have wondered if I might get tossed around with a side wind, but so far I have not experienced that.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by redline814 View Post
    I have all the Revelate bags and love them. But, for a lighterweight everyday frame bag I use a Porta-Pack Wedge. Love it. At $28 its a steal of a deal. The zipper is on the right side and I can still access my water bottle.

    Porta-Pack: Sport Rack Pack, Bike Storage Pack. Providing storage traditional packs do not, water resistant and made from heavy duty Cordura. Made in the USA.
    Dang, those things are pretty cool.

  25. #25
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    Frame Bag for Everyday Riding???-10547023_265317833675605_662926395_n.jpg

    Rich at CraterPacks made me this awesome cuben fiber full triangle bag. I love using it to carry my tools and 100 oz. bladder on normal rides, not having all that weight on your back is so nice.
    "...when I stand to climb I'm like the Hulk rowing the USS Badass up the Kickass River."
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