Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 43
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    259

    Flats or Clipless Pedals?

    Do anyone have a strong opinions about using flats, Wellgo MG1s, instead of SPDs for a 7 day hut to hut from Telluride to Moab?

    I'm leaning towards wearing flats for comfort and so i can save space and bring only bring one pair of shoes.

  2. #2
    undercover brother
    Reputation: tangaroo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    875
    Quote Originally Posted by mappable View Post
    Do anyone have a strong opinions about using flats, Wellgo MG1s, instead of SPDs for a 7 day hut to hut from Telluride to Moab?

    I'm leaning towards wearing flats for comfort and so i can save space and bring only bring one pair of shoes.
    I was about to lament the fact that their are wayyyy too many of these threads thinking it was a beginner asking which was better for general riding. Good thing I read before I posted

    I have no experience in 7 day rides, but I would imagine flats would be the way to go. Space/weight/packing all would be reduced and regular shoes would be more comfortable over the span of a week. (IMO)

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    625
    Flat tend to make me less racer boy for whatever reason. Something to consider I'd you have trouble pacing yourself for the epics.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: connolm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    310
    Subscribed.

    Considering a 7 days trip myself... Asking myself the same question...

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Central Scrutinizer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    137
    FWIW, I'm getting ready to do 7 days or so on the Ozark Trail (MO) in October. I'll be using flats for all the reasons tangaroo mentioned - one less thing to haul, better for hike-a-biking, less fiddly, etc. Still haven't decided between a pair of low-rise light hikers or my Keen sandals. Both work well.

    IMHO the pedaling efficiency of flats vs clipless is minimal - nowhere near enough to make the difference between finishing strong & bonking.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Hellcat405's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    57
    I've been riding clipless pedals for 10.5 years and honestly feel a bit naked with flats... don't get me wrong they are great for riding the cruiser with flip flops on the way to the bar, but for any kind of even halfway serious riding I choose clipless. I like to wear some insulated Crocs or house slippers around camp, they don't weigh much (less than 3/4's of a pound) and they squish down flat in your bag/pack.

    Just sayin'
    Last edited by Hellcat405; 08-21-2012 at 07:16 AM. Reason: they don't way much!?!??! FIXED IT!

  7. #7
    A guy on a bike Moderator
    Reputation: TobyGadd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    923
    My personal preference is clipless. There are lots of clipless shoes that are great for hiking and walking around camp, so two pairs of shoes aren't really necessary. Check out the Pearl Izumi X-Alps series, or some of the Shimano mountain-bike touring shoes.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    259
    I'd consider more comfortable clipless shoes for the walking sections if they were available in wide sizes.

    I've only been able to find sidi mega dominators that are wide enough to wear comfortably. They suck to walk in though with the hard plastic soles on the sidi's.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dream4est's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    1,213
    I have been riding/racing multi day with both for years, and I like flats better mainly for hikeabike. But each rider should also consider their riding background as well. I rode both ways for years before bikepacking, developing good technical skills in both.

    Also, pedal thickness plays a big role in flat pedal choice. The thinner, new nylon pedals absolutely rule over thicker versions like the Wellgo MG-1. Closer to the axle means much more efficiency. Here is my pedal choice the the recent CTR:

    Amazon.com: Black-Ops Nylo-Pro Pedals - 9/16", Black: Sports & Outdoors

    They are great pedals. The bearings are smooth and the pedals dont spin but sit in place (nice for tricks at the dj's). They are still money after 500 miles of abuse. No painful metal to ankle hits whilst hikeabiking either. Rocks just seem to take shavings off these pedals, not hunks of metal like alloy versions.

    To the OP- your choice of pedals will suit you fine if you dont want to shell out another 40 bucks. Thick alloy pedals still work great- Jefe Branham won the 2010 AZT 300 on Shimano DX's, the thickest pedal ever.

  10. #10
    Ride da mOOn Moderator
    Reputation: NEPMTBA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,980
    Flats for me...

    ...but then I ride everything with flats, including Motos... LOL

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,207
    I ride flats 99% of the time and never want to go back to my clipped in days.

    Having said that I wouldn't make a switch right before a multi-day trip. I'd ride what you normally ride at home. If you normally clip in I'd stick with that or start the transition on shorter trips close to home so you can see how you like riding flats.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    14
    I've gotten so used to clipless I couldn't imagine riding without them. I'd go clipless and bring along a pair of Sanuk Sidewalk Surfers. The Sanuks are light and roll up small.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Trail_Blazer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,013
    I don't know if I'd be happy peddling that long without clip less peddles, but I need a lot of ankle support when hiking.

    If I were going on that long of a trek with one pair of shoes I'd go with one of these two:

    Mavic Alpine XL
    Shimano MT-91

    I have not owned either, but they are the pair I see recommended time after time through dozens of similar MTBR threads.

    e.g.
    Burliest SPD compatible shoes, 3/4 height?

  14. #14
    Really I am that slow
    Reputation: SlowerThenSnot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,761
    divide on flats and keen saddles this summer, i dig em, seems less hard on the knees as well.

    just my .02
    Read my BLOG!

    Nipple twister and bike builder at Borealis

    http://www.borealisbikes.com/

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 40Acres's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    49
    For those that ride flats, what types of shoes do y'all normally wear?

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: greenwater's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    76
    For me, bikepacking is about exploration. Both on the bike and off. I'm usually not in much of a hurry when bikepacking. Although I wouldn't think of going for a trail ride in flats, when I'm bikepacking that is what I bring. I'm not an endurance racer so losing a little efficiency is not a big deal. The trade off is the ability to go explore a ridge or canyon whenever you feel like it. Granted there are clip in shoes out there that are decent for hike-a-bike but the reality is, if you are clipped in you tend to just keep riding if you happen to see something cool to explore. Whereas if you have a pair of sticky approach shoes on flats and you see a cool area to check out, you will do it. Ever since I was a little kid my habit has been to get to a camp, drop the pack, kayak, truck, whatever and go exploring. I like to do the same thing bikepacking. So for me, having a good pair of shoes for cruising supersedes the more efficient and connected feel of clipless pedals and shoes. That said, there are times when I would bring clipless on a bikepacking trip. If I had a lot of miles to cover, or road time etc. As usual it's not black and white, It's all about bringing the right tool, at the right time, for the right job.

  17. #17
    Bicycle Radical
    Reputation: scorchedearth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    276
    I'd wear flats for this trip. Clipless shoes will offer little advantage for your ride and may only hinder you in hike-a-bike or when you want to explore off of the trail/path you are taking.
    Free people must travel the road to productive social relations at the speed of a bicycle.- Ivan Illich

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,558
    Here's what I use. Flats w/ toe clips. Requires some DIY but offers the best of both worlds. Regular "toe clip & strap pedals are usually too small and narrow to really work well "out in the field". Larger "platform" flats put the straps out wide enough so the tread from your boots/shoes has less tendency to get caught on the straps going in and out. Plus you can tie them up upside down and have an "open" flat. The traction pins on SOME platforms are the same threads as SOME derailleur adjustment screws, which I used here to attach the toe clip to the pedal using existing pin holes. I simply cut stock flange off of the toe clip and positioned them to fit my riding shoes/boots. Plastic toe clips can be re-shaped to fit the shape of different boots as well. Using the pedal as a handle, dip the toe clip into boiling water to heat it up, then (with a glove on) you can bend and re-shape the toe clip.

    FILE0041

    FILE0038

    I modified my old Lake's for adventure riding as well. Took them to the local shoe repair shop and they put some cool Vibram's on with a little more heel as well. Dang good for hiking... Awesome for pedaling.

    S1190004

    Happy Trails!
    Last edited by ward; 08-22-2012 at 10:29 AM.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: littlebadboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    187
    I have dual pedals installed on mine. I love them! I'm not a hardcore trail rider though.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    32
    Azonic 420s, under $100 and work flawlessly with shoes/sandals/boots with Vibram soles.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    337
    I just did a 2 week ride across the mountains and trashed my SPD shoes carrying up to the high cols.. If you anticipate any hiking / pushing on the route, go with flats and sturdy but light boots. I also would have felt more sensible over the rocky carry sections in trail boots i/o SPD shoes. Cleats on rocks aren't that great.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    22
    My last tour was 14 days long and I used Wellgo MG-1 pedals with my favorite running shoes. I get off the bike way too much to have any kind of clips under my shoes. It probably depends a lot on the way you ride when on a tour. I tend to take many photos, so I stop every 20 minutes or so, often for animals. To get a good photo, many times I have to put the bike down and walk a bit/climb up rocks/hop over fences.
    Also, with all the luggage on the bike, I want to make sure I can get my foot on the ground quickly whenever I lose balance. It's even less fun to fall onto the side when you can't unclip when you have 50 pounds of bags attached to the bike.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    25
    Sometimes I miss the control and power of my SPDs when on hills but there is a whole lot of comfort - summer or winter - with the flats (Blackspire's) when I take my loaded Fatback on multiday backcountry mountain tours. Different story with my hardtail - stick with the SPD's.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Rock dude's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    639
    Flats with 510 shoes, they stick to slick rock like glue.

  25. #25
    I'm your density
    Reputation: random walk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,475
    I will probably replace my SPD pedals (which I use for normal riding) with flats and use my Merrell hiking shoes for bikepacking. This is what I used before I went to SPDs.

    That customized toe-clip idea looks interesting.
    "Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left."
    Ty Webb

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •