Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    52

    First Bike expedition, 5+ Nights. Bike/Component Help

    There is a few purpose built cycle trails close to where I live that I'd like to do earlier next year, most of them are in the 200-400Km range. I have a Burley Nomad trailer and a FS All Mountain Bike but have never done more than 20-30km at a time. I'm looking to get a bike a bit more suited to the task, something which I can use for commuting as well. The trails are all mostly hard packed clay/stone with some tar sealed road in some places, generally pretty good easy condition but could a bit rougher in places.

    I was looking at something like the Specialized Crosstrail Sport Disc, what other options should I be looking at.

    Also with the drive train, I have 3x9 on my current bike and never use the largest crank so was wondering if there are any good 2x10 options with more lower gears and less in the high range.

    Lastly, how far can I realistically travel in a day? Obviously there is a lot of variables here, like the terrain, my fitness level etc but even a ballpark figure would helpful.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    382
    Your post is pretty loaded, so I'll answer part of it: Stick with your current bike, but make sure that it is in good repair prior to your trip. You may not enjoy this type of outing, which would be a real drag to discover after investing a great deal of money on a specific bike/gear.

    Keep the current triple, as a 2x10 set up is less-likely to give you a lower gear than what you have. For lower gearing, you could have a 20t granny ring in the front, with a 36t large cog in the back.

    As you stated the distance you cover in a day depends on your fitness, trail conditions, weather, and many other dynamic factors. Not being familiar with your situation, I couldn't even venture a guess.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Skeeno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    142
    Your all mountain bike is not really the type of mtb that most people use for bikepacking. Most stick to hard tails. It could be done, but weight possibly be an issue. The same goes for the trailer. It can be done, but most choose to go more minimalist. My advice would be to see if you could possibly rent or borrow a bike from someone before dropping a bunch of money on a bike you may or may not want to ride again. Like stated above, you don't even know if you will enjoy this type of outing yet.

    For my first trip, I used a bike I already had and adapted it to bikepack. Now that I know I enjoyed it, I can make upgrades and modifications to male the next one better.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    52
    I was already looking at getting a hardtail bike for commuting hence why I wasn't to worried about getting something that would work for trails as well. I do get your point though, there are lots of cycle tour companies that operate on these trails so I could hire one from them (it might be cheaper to buy one however), but I might be able to find one to borrow from a friend.

    I had been told by someone that using a trailer on a bike with rear suspension is a bad idea which is another reason I was keen to get a 2nd bike.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    52
    Finally set a date, heading out on the 16th of April so will get some nice Autumn colors along the way. My Parents are going to be taking my trailer to where I'll be starting from next time there down my way so packing everything I won't need to use before then now, and will pack everything else in when I get up there.

    Made a list of what I'm packing, is there anything I've missed?

    Packed:
    Tent
    Sleeping bag/Sleeping Matt
    Stove, Matches
    Cooking Pot/Pan and untensils.
    Food meals/snacks (NZ Army Ration packs)
    First Aid kit
    Locks

    To Pack:
    Clothes, 2 sets + extra socks.
    Jacket
    Bike tools/Pump/Puncture kit
    Spare tubes
    Torch
    Stove fuel 2x (Need to buy)
    15000 mA/h USB Charger (in route)
    Camera gear/Tripod
    GPS
    AA Batteries x8
    Water

    Packing the stuff in the back I'll only need at the end of each day, and stuff I'll need during the day in the front:




  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hammockman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    18
    Have fun!

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Flamingtaco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    409
    One spare tire for the bike and trailer?

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    382
    Quote Originally Posted by Flamingtaco View Post
    One spare tire for the bike and trailer?
    Usually a tire boot/dental floss & needle suffice. That's all I would take for what he is doing. For the trailer, I can't imagine anything destroying it to the point that it is not repairable. Trailer tires have much less weight on them than tires on the bike.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    52
    Quote Originally Posted by johnlh View Post
    Trailer tires have much less weight on them than tires on the bike.
    Heh, that depends on how much you take with you :P I've also seen people tie a stick in place of wheel in a ski like fashion when unable to fix a wheel, wouldn't want to go far like that though.

    In theory there as about 10kg's of weight on each wheel, assuming the marketing of about 20% of the weight being transferred to the bike. They are reasonably low pressure at a recommended 40 PSI.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    15
    A few questions: I'm assuming this is in NZ; whereabouts? What bike did you end up going with? And how much water are you packing (could you limit that by bringing a filter pump/sterilizer if you're traveling near flowing water)? Good luck and enjoy!

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    52
    It starts at Mt Cook and ends in Oamaru (middle of the South Island), just going with F/S bike, not the best but can't afford a new bike just for this.

    I haven't decided on how much water yet, from what I can tell there are plenty of streams around with water you can drink straight out of, so I'm thinking carry enough for about 2 days at a time and keep it topped up.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    15
    That sounds like a blast. Enjoy! Please post pictures (seems like you have a nice camera setup) when you return.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    52
    Back home, great ride except the horrible weather for the first three days. The locations where great, but most of the dedicated trail is horrible soft rocky crap that at some points I was sinking 2-3 inches into. Average speed per today varied from 22km/h for the Omarama -Duntroon sections (mostly road) to 8.5km/h for the sections along Lake Pukaki (horrible gravel road)

    The trailer held up, there is a couple places where the canvas material has worn a bit from rubbing creating a couple small holes, also zero punctures or any other mechanical problems on bike or trailer. There was one or two fords I had to take the trailer off and carry it across, and several gates that I had to do the same.

    Also strava page for the ride: Mountain Bike Ride Profile | 298 kilometers near Tekapo | Times and Records | Strava

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    52
    The Landscapes:










  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    52
    The Trail/Bike:









  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Skeeno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    142
    Awesome. Glad things went well. Ready for another yet?

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    52
    Quote Originally Posted by Skeeno View Post
    Awesome. Glad things went well. Ready for another yet?
    Not for awhile, maybe another one the same time next year.

  18. #18
    ColoradoCoolBreeze
    Reputation: SingleTrackLovr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    679
    Nice trip report and picts. Have any more picts to look thru?
    If you did this trip again would you still haul the trailer or lighten everything up and try bikebags?
    Thanks for taking the time to post up this report.

    04 Azonic Saber
    08 Yeti AS-x
    12 Rocky Mtn 29er Alt 970



  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    52
    There is a few more here:https://www.flickr.com/photos/rileyb...7644195349242/

    Tough question, I'm not sure that I would recomend to anyone that they do this trail with a trailer as the surface of the trails is just to rough atm. I would certainly like to try it with paniers and see how it compares but that would probably require buying a new bike (or hiring).

    I've been looking at a Recumbent Trike lately, but at the same time I'm not sure the smaller wheels and low clearance would suit a trail like this one either.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    362
    A two wheel trailer is most suitable for tarmac duty but I take my hat off to you persevering with it.
    I have a Carry Freedom Y-frame (large) two wheel trailer for onroad work
    Carry Freedom Website | a bike trailer revolution
    but now finally have bought a Extrawheel trailer for superior off road suitability.
    Bicycle Trailer - Extrawheel.com

    Great thread.
    I enjoyed your pics.
    Thanks for sharing.

    There is a couple of options I've seen for a FS bike regarding panniers.
    One is the Topeak (?) rack
    Topeak MTX Beam Rack Review - a review of Topeak's MTX Beam Rack for your Bike
    which attaches to the seat-post (best results after first wrapping some old inner tubing around the post) or the NZ designed Freeload (now Thule).
    bikepacking.net > Gear reviews > Freeload rack

    Also handy is adding a couple or four water bottles by having wrapped some inner tube around the bottom of your forks, using some radiator hose clips to add some cages.

    Just some ways I've seen others add utility to their rigs.
    I've a fully rigid bike with lots of rack mounts so already set regarding luggage.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    9
    Awesome pictures, thank you for sharing. I'm sure that was a ton of work, good for you!

Similar Threads

  1. Dialing in the build of my expedition/bikepacking bike, very excited.
    By rufio in forum Bikepacking and Bike Expedition
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-13-2013, 12:10 AM
  2. Moots Snoots expedition bike for sale.
    By mikesee in forum Bikepacking and Bike Expedition
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-29-2013, 05:54 PM
  3. Bike Packing - expedition Forum?
    By SuPrBuGmAn in forum Site Feedback/Issues
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-03-2011, 09:38 AM
  4. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 08-12-2011, 05:56 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-24-2011, 01:34 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •