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  1. #1
    @adelorenzo
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    Easton Kilo 1P tent

    LBS has these in the shop, they look pretty sweet but not finding a lot of reviews on line. Anyone used one and can offer some thoughts?

    Easton Mountain Products


  2. #2
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    hmmmm... Kinda pricey

    Seems a bit pricey - which is quite fine if money is no object... It certainly looks very nice.

    I got my $30 Wenzel Hiker/Biker tent down to 1lbs. 13 oz. with some modest modifications. That's lighter than that Easton. [Disclaimer: I haven't yet spent a night in it... waiting on the weather!]



    I like the idea of an enclosed vestibule with the Easton. And those fancy pole connectors look incredibly nice. Plus I would trust the Easton name implicitly.

    So ask yourself - do you want something absolutely ready to go out-of-the-box? Get that tent. Want to save some money and tinker in the process? Explore other options.

  3. #3
    @adelorenzo
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    Good point, it is kind of pricey. Money is an object but I'm doing a really remote expedition this year (with major hike-a-bike) so weight is paramount.

    I was looking at something like the MSR Hubba but this one is significantly lighter and, as you say, the Easton name is pretty solid to put on a product.

  4. #4
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    Anthony,

    With weight being such a premium, I'd dispense with the idea of taking any full-on tent/fly. Why not a bivy bag, hooped/poled bivy, tarp-style "tent" or some other super-light solution a la connol's setup? Do you plan on spending copious time in the tent? Do you have to be able to sit up inside it?

    Mike

  5. #5
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    Best weight savings would be a hammock. That eliminates the tent, ground cloth, and sleeping pad from your pack.

    Do check out Tarptents too. (Tarptent is a brand.) They look really really nice! I wanted a Contrail for a while. It's only $199 too - a little less than that Easton.

    Tarptent Ultralight Shelters

  6. #6
    @adelorenzo
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    Good points again, thanks for the responses. Some more stuff to think about.

    I've never used a bivy or a tarp before, so it's unfamiliar territory. Those tarp shelters are pretty cool but it seems to be set up with a trekking pole? I guess I could substitute a bike or maybe a paddle from the packraft to make it stand up?

    The one advantage to being able to sit up in the tent is you have somewhere to hang out and hide from the bugs if needed. Otherwise it's not a big deal, mostly just need a place to sleep.

    Hammock is definitely out as suitable trees will be scarce/non-existent on this trip, that also applies to most of the other areas around here that I like to go.

  7. #7
    Ariolimax columbianus
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    just got a tarptent rainbow and used it last week in a rainstorm over a couple of nights on a short bikecamping trip. held up great, no moisture comin through, temps never really dipped down past the lower 40's though. very roomy for one and light as a can of soup. needs to be staked out though and the single pole packs down a little long, wasn't too bad tucked into my revelate harness.

  8. #8
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthony.delorenzo View Post
    Those tarp shelters are pretty cool but it seems to be set up with a trekking pole? I guess I could substitute a bike or maybe a paddle from the packraft to make it stand up?

    The one advantage to being able to sit up in the tent is you have somewhere to hang out and hide from the bugs if needed.
    Most, but not all, need some kind of pole that isn`t included in the weight spec or the price, going on the assumption that people are already carrying one. Like you suggested, you might be able to substitute a paddle, or you could carry a separate aluminum tent pole for another 6 to 8 oz.

    A lot of the tarp shelters have sewn in floors and full netting, whether you want it or not. I`m pretty sure Shires`s Tarptents all come that way now.

    Like Nativeson`s Rainbow, most need to be staked out. The few that are supposedly freestanding, or can be made that way with extra pieces I don`t think I would trust to any kind of wind. Of course, I`ve never used one, so that part is speculation

    Any rate, they might or might not be for you, but I think I`ll be ordering one the next time I have some extra money burning a hole in my pocket.

  9. #9
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    One thing to consider is a lot of these UL shelters are not freestanding. If you don't have good ground to stake or things to tie off with, you can be in trouble. Really sandy soil, solid rock, frozen ground can be problematic.

    In some cases in places like tundra and some deserts you may need a freestanding tent, which causes weight penalty, or a bivy sack.

  10. #10
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    Great points, all.

    I heart you, Anthony...it's the perennial balance of camping comfort and weight.

    There are some good hooped bivy options that can cover a lot of bases. I've owned a couple of that style and used them a bunch. My Black Diamond Bipod bivi works unstaked, is bug proof, storm-worthy and light. You can't sit up in it, tho. Individual preference how claustrophobic you can endure for how long. Straight-up bivy sacks are pretty demoralizing in a storm.

    Cheers,

    Mike

  11. #11
    @adelorenzo
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmmorath View Post
    One thing to consider is a lot of these UL shelters are not freestanding. If you don't have good ground to stake or things to tie off with, you can be in trouble. Really sandy soil, solid rock, frozen ground can be problematic.

    In some cases in places like tundra and some deserts you may need a freestanding tent, which causes weight penalty, or a bivy sack.
    That has been in the back of my mind. My neck of the woods is not usually very good for staking stuff out.

  12. #12
    @adelorenzo
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    This thread triggered a serious bout of research. The Tarptent Double Rainbow looks awesome, but I have also started thinking more seriously about a bvy. I actually ordered an Integral Designs bivy but it turns out they won't make one for me.

    A Hilleberg Atko just popped up on the local buy and sell so I am checking that out tomorrow. Not the lightest tent but looks pretty nice and the price is right. May try to add a bivy as well so I have options.

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