• 04-01-2013
    Eat, Drink, Live,MTB
    The do's and the don'ts of bikepacking
    He all I was wandering if there is anything that I shouldknow about bikepacking before I actually go out and try it. You know the dosand the doníts, the things I donít what to lean first hand, other than the obviousthing like bring plenty of water and food. Any advice will be appreciated sofeel free to ramble on and on, thanks.
  • 04-01-2013
    owtdorz
    Just a short overniter first.
    Also check out here:
    Bikepacking.net forums - Index
  • 04-01-2013
    Eat, Drink, Live,MTB
    Yeah that's what i was planning doing, and thanks for the link i will check it out.
  • 04-02-2013
    RandomGuyOnABike
    Some odd things that are relevant / easily missed:

    Do's
    • Take a first aid kit
    • Learn how to use said first aid kit
    • If the weather forecast calls for clear skies, take a rain kit, cause it will probably rain
    • Sticks and stones will break your bones.. they can also be used to make fire.
    • Let someone know were you are going.


    Don't's

    • Pack "just enough". Emergency situations can and will happen. My rule of thumb is for each day planned, I take 3 days worth of supplies (ie: food)
    • Eat things in nature unless you have experience with identifying those things. Bright colored "things" are usually a sign of deadly / poisonous things.
    • Leave your cellphone behind. You can leave it off, but you may need to call someone.
    • Depend on technology.


    I'm sure there are a million more things, but yea, your number one priority should always be to stay safe.
  • 04-02-2013
    ascarlarkinyar
    water is one of the most important things we need to survive. you can go longer without eating than drinking.

    that being said, without food your not going to be able to keep going forward.

    staying warm is also high on the list. staying dry when it's freezing is also important.

    keeping feet/hands/face from not freezing is often overlooked. the usual shoes/gloves are not warm enough below 40 degrees.

    a little extra is better than not enough. practice with short trips and work your way up.

    always have a plan "B" and "C" and who can rescue you if you need it.

    a tough trip can be the best one. too tough of a trip will be a nightmare.

    what might go wrong, will go wrong.

    do:
    sunscreen, bug spray, mosquito net, benadryl, ib profin(will dehydrate you), have massive fun
    small things that might break:
    brake pads/springs, shoe cleats, crankbro pedals, chain, jockey wheel, chainring bolt, tubes, shifter cable

    do not:
    think any animal is not dangerous, leave any trash(pack it out), trust that mechanical things will not fail, stare at the sun, forget to tell someone where/when u are going, sleep in dirty/sweaty clothes(especially riding shorts)
  • 04-02-2013
    Eat, Drink, Live,MTB
    Thanks for all the advice, I am really bad about forgetting stuff when it comes to packing so i will be coming back here for sure. Pleas keep posting i am learning a lot and hope to learn a lot more.
  • 04-02-2013
    TobyGadd
    For me, part of the joy of spending time outside is learning what works and what doesn't. So other than encouraging you to stay reasonably safe, my primary advice would be to get out there and have fun!
  • 04-02-2013
    jbphilly
    Do: Take your first trip in a low-key, non-threatening environment. Rather than going into the high, remote Rockies on your first outing, find someplace where you're not as far from civilization and where conditions won't be as harsh. Also perhaps somewhere where the riding won't be as hard. My first bikepacking trips were into the Pine Barrens in New Jersey - you're never all that far from civilization, and the terrain is extremely flat and easy to ride on. Much more forgiving than if I'd tried to head up into, say, the middle of George Washington National Forest or something with little experience riding loaded.
  • 04-02-2013
    wahday
    The do's and the don'ts of bikepacking
    Great advice here. I mentally run through the days I will be gone and imagine what I will need at each stage of the day. In general I always want to be able to get warm and stay dry, have plenty to eat and drink, and have basic tools to "field dress" me or the bike. Always have a plan in case something really bad happens (the biggest being tell someone where you are going). I might also emphasize the importance of sleeping comfortably - whatever that means to you.
  • 04-02-2013
    verslowrdr
    Don't eat the yellow snow.
  • 04-02-2013
    Eat, Drink, Live,MTB
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by verslowrdr View Post
    Don't eat the yellow snow.

    Wait, what, why not?
  • 04-03-2013
    musikron
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Eat, Drink, Live,MTB View Post
    I am really bad about forgetting stuff when it comes to packing.

    Make a pack list. Laminate it and pack it with you. Each time you pack up refer to the list to make sure you aren't leaving something behind. I cannot tell you how many times that has saved my ass.
  • 04-03-2013
    Trower
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Eat, Drink, Live,MTB View Post
    Wait, what, why not?

    Zappa says you shouldn't, no further reason required:P
  • 04-03-2013
    vikb
    The biggest mistake most cyclists make when considering bike touring is not going. You don't need really specialized gear or to prepare like mad. Just pick an easy route close to home and get out there.
  • 04-03-2013
    Trower
    On a serious note, do bring a bit of duct tape, can sometimes really come in handy! I take and wrap some onto my seatube and then it's there and it really doesnt take up any extra space, and you don't have to put a ton on so added weight is very minimal.
  • 04-03-2013
    stevland
    DO:
    - Research the be-jeebus out of everyone else's setups. This will give you a better idea of what/how to pack. You can make adjustments later on
    - Know how to fix it (all of it) when it breaks. Make sure your repair kit has it all
    - Plan your route, mileage, water and food resupplies. Know it intimately.

    Don't:
    - Forget TP
  • 04-03-2013
    verslowrdr
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    The biggest mistake most cyclists make when considering bike touring is not going. You don't need really specialized gear or to prepare like mad. Just pick an easy route close to home and get out there.

    Darn straight. We did a couple trips before we really had 'the right stuff'. In fact we're still not 'doing it right' since husby doesn't have a frame bag and my frame isn't even conducive to one. Meh...

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by stevland View Post
    Don't:
    - Forget TP

    Dude, this is what God made leaves for- didn't you get the memo?
  • 04-03-2013
    evdog
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by verslowrdr View Post
    Dude, this is what God made leaves for- didn't you get the memo?

    Try some bikepacking in Arizona and see how well that works out for you :lol:
  • 04-05-2013
    Addy Marx
    Do: Just go out and ride your bike with enough stuff to keep you warm at night and dry in the day. You'll learn very quickly that you brought too much, cut it down next time. Use your brain, be safe, you'll be fine. Fun first.

    Don't: Spend too much time on the internet scrutinizing every piece of gear everyone else 'uses' once or twice a year and then types/blogs/posts about the rest of the time. More miles, less posts.

    Have fun!
  • 04-05-2013
    Eat, Drink, Live,MTB
    Yeah i'm not going to boy a old man rack, and $200 bags I just want to mainly know safety tips, but also general information. you know if your going to go backpacking you don't want to bring brand new boots, you want to bring boots that are already worn in to prevent blisters. stuff like that but for bikepacking. once again thanks for all the post and relay enjoying them.
  • 04-05-2013
    connolm
    "Practice" your menu at home beforehand. Make sure your stove can acccomodate your plans and serving sizes. Make sure portions are correct. Make sure you have all the ingredients. Get a feel for how much fuel it takes to make a meal.

    ...and if you're planning on using free-dried camp food, find out if it's edible by trying it first at home. Some of those things are down-right gross. You wouldn't want to get into the woods to find out the "Spaghetti" tastes like ocean water from all the sodium and the "Huevos Rancheros" are really just yellow-colored tasteless gruel.
  • 04-05-2013
    Eat, Drink, Live,MTB
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by connolm View Post
    "Practice" your menu at home beforehand. Make sure your stove can acccomodate your plans and serving sizes. Make sure portions are correct. Make sure you have all the ingredients. Get a feel for how much fuel it takes to make a meal.

    ...and if you're planning on using free-dried camp food, find out if it's edible by trying it first at home. Some of those things are down-right gross. You wouldn't want to get into the woods to find out the "Spaghetti" tastes like ocean water from all the sodium and the "Huevos Rancheros" are really just yellow-colored tasteless gruel.

    Thanks for the advice that is a good point. I will probably go with something like Mountain House meals. As far as stove go's i will be going with a MSR pocket rocket type stove.
  • 04-05-2013
    vikb
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by connolm View Post

    ...and if you're planning on using free-dried camp food, find out if it's edible by trying it first at home.

    +1 - That's solid advice, BUT what tastes good in camp doesn't always taste good at home. After a long hot day on the bike I can devour salty foods that would be too much after a day at work in front of the computer.

    OTOH - there are some pretty gnarly meals for sale. I tend to buy the same 5 or 6 every time and just rotate through them.
  • 04-05-2013
    RandomGuyOnABike
    1 Attachment(s)
    Better yet, make your own!

  • 04-05-2013
    farleybob
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RandomGuyOnABike View Post
    Better yet, make your own!


    That looks a little bulky to pack!?! ;0)