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Thread: Camera?

  1. #1
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    New question here. Camera?

    What Camera is everyone taking for their rides?

    DSLR? Point and Shoot? Something in between?

    How are you carrying them?

    Post your model and what you do/don't like about it.

  2. #2
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    I have a point and shoot 10 mp Sony waterproof/rugged camera. It's an older model. The photos are not all that spectacular and it doesn't zoom much. But it is bomb proof. Waterproof-freezeproof-and very shock resistant.

    I would recommend a rugged one. It's nice not having to worry really or purchase extra bulky protection cases. But unless Sony has gotten better with their models with my critiques above, I'd recommend looking at other companies.

  3. #3
    A guy on a bike Moderator
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    I second the waterproof/rugged camera recommendation. I've got an older Panasonic DMC-TS1, and it's great. I carry it in a small pouch on the waist strap of my pack. Nice not to worry about rain, dirt, or a few bumps. Rugged cameras in general have gotten a bit of a bad rap from people swimming & snorkeling with them--but rain hasn't hurt mine.

  4. #4
    Trail Rider
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    I used to use my fiance's Pentax W80, its waterproof/freezeproof/can take a fall. Photos aren't great and it lacks alot of the control I want.


    Lately I've just sucked it up and carry my Olympus E420 w/25mm pancake lense. Its the smallest dSLR made(atleast it was?) and paired with the 25mm prime, isn't too godawefull big. I have a magnesium bodied E1 with weatherproofing that I'd rather take, but its just too dang big....

    I really want to get a mirrorless camera. Olympus even has one with weathersealing and a magnesium body.... drool. Super easy to just throw in your pocket with a prime.

  5. #5
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    P&S nowadays (Canon Elph 310 HS), but I also have a superzoom (Canon SX20 IS) that I used to take. Not gonna even consider my 7D.

    The superzoom works pretty well & isn't nearly as bulky as a DSLR. I've been really happy with the Elph though - it's super-small and has pretty good low-light sensitivity. I carried it in a handlebar bag on a recent trip and it had no problems from vibration etc (even w/my rigid Fargo). There's a CHDK build for it but I haven't tried it yet.

    +1 on mirrorless...considering replacing my SX20.

  6. #6
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    This



    with this



    is pretty much my dream bikepacking camera setup.

  7. #7
    R.I.P. Pugsley.
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    I use a simlpe Nikon AW-100 16mp camera that is waterproof, shockproof, freezeproof...
    That waterproof part isn't really as waterproof as i thought it would be.
    After submerging the camera unde 12" of water, there was water inside the camera.
    So im not going to try and see if it is really shock or freezeproof.
    But i do have to say that Nikon has good customes service, and they replaced mine with a new one.
    The new one was in a new box, so i got a extra charger and battery out of it.

  8. #8
    aka RossC
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    I've carried a canon 400d with a variety of lens's. If it is a short trip, I can usually squeeze it in. If it is a longer trip and I'm short of space, then it often has to stay home and I just take some crappy point and shoot thing and swear at it a lot.

    I've spent some time thinking about something like this: Sony Nex (E-mount Cameras) : Sony Australia

    They are far more compact in the flesh than a traditional SLR.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by rusheleven View Post
    What Camera is everyone taking for their rides?

    DSLR? Point and Shoot? Something in between?

    How are you carrying them?

    Post your model and what you do/don't like about it.
    I am a serious amatuer photographer but when riding I prefer to keep it simple and light.

    I use a Nikon AW100 for my bike rides, small point and shoot, GPS enabled, rugged, shockproof and waterproof. Does the job!

    Nikon AW100 COOLPIX Compact Digital Camera | Underwater Camera

  10. #10
    R.I.P. Pugsley.
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    Quote Originally Posted by beshannon View Post
    I am a serious amatuer photographer but when riding I prefer to keep it simple and light.

    I use a Nikon AW100 for my bike rides, small point and shoot, GPS enabled, rugged, shockproof and waterproof. Does the job!

    Nikon AW100 COOLPIX Compact Digital Camera | Underwater Camera
    Have you used yours under water ?

  11. #11
    Fail again. Fail better.
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    I use a Ricoh GRD III, lovely camera. Recently I bought a Fuji x100 for better image quality, it's not nearly as pocketable so I'm not sure if it will replace the GRD for quick bike trips.
    Both are fixed focal length, so probably not the first choice as a travel camera. I don't mind.
    Roads? Where we're going we don't need roads. -Dr Emmett Brown

  12. #12
    Cumbria, England.
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    A lot of this info is food for thought for me. I had been using a Sony TX-10 (waterproof, shockproof p&s), I've been quite happy with it and have still been using it for kayaking/canoeing. I bought it thinking that if it can stand a bit of water and dirt, I'd use it more, rather than something that would have to be well protected and ending up in the bottom of my bag.

    I'm now doing an outdoor media degree though and all the pics I take are supposed to be shot using manual settings. I also want the best quality camera I can afford but it also needs to do good video...I'd been looking at Canon DSLR's due to this. Seeing that many of you don't or won't carry a DSLR around is making me wonder about something else. I've been using one of the uni's 7D's which I do like and can just about afford. Thinking of carrying that, along with a tripod, whilst bikepacking does worry me a bit. I will be doing some trips as part of my degree though (documenting it and probably making a film of it), so maybe I would just have to put up with that?

    I like the look of the Olympus above, but the video isn't good enough for me and I've read that the buttons are quite fiddly for those with big hands...my fingers are like ET's!
    - The seasons blow away, but the love is just the same -

  13. #13
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    What you want is a canon Canon U.S.A. : Consumer & Home Office : PowerShot SX40 HS

    I've been using this and carry it in a small topeak handle bar bag with a spare batt. and the charger i think its great!
    “An adventure is misery and discomfort, relived in the safety of reminiscence.” Marco Polo

  14. #14
    turtles make me hot
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    I currently use an Olympus Tough Series 8010. It's waterproof, freeze proof and shock proof and takes a damn nice picture.
    I like turtles

  15. #15
    Give it a crank
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    My Samsung HZ30W has been great, compact and with lots of useful features though it's a bit outdated now. It's not dustproof or waterproof and it's gotten a bit of both over time.

    I keep it either in my Camelbak or in a top tube bag for quick access. I used to carry a Nikon D40 with a zoom lens but it was just too bulky for mountain biking.

    I'm also using my smartphone while riding a lot more often now too. Lots of great camera options out there now perfect for mtb.

  16. #16
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    I am a part time photographer. I use Nikon D300S and D7000 DSLRs. The D7000 is a great work horse. While doing some press work, the both bodies were out in heavy rain many times.

    I highly recommend the D7000.

  17. #17
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    I'm using a Canon Powershot G12. High-end point and shoot, basically. I like that it gives me control over aperture size and shutter speed, allowing for much better images than a point and shoot, but is also much smaller and lighter than my DSLR. Obviously the downside is that it's not as good as my DSLR purely as a camera, but its bulk and weight make it the obvious superior choice for bikepacking and backpacking.

    Photos taken with are on my site, Julian Bender - Travels and Photos, under "bikepacking" and "photography" (2012 albums only; I didn't have it before that)

  18. #18
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    For off-road touring I take an old Canon DSLR with el-cheapo kit lenses. It does the job adequately. I carry the camera, usually with only two lenses, a short zoom and a medium telephoto zoom, 3 spare cards and a few spare batteries, carried in a back pack.

    Pictures by WildWassa - Photobucket

    Warren

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbphilly View Post
    I'm using a Canon Powershot G12. High-end point and shoot, basically. I like that it gives me control over aperture size and shutter speed, allowing for much better images than a point and shoot, but is also much smaller and lighter than my DSLR. Obviously the downside is that it's not as good as my DSLR purely as a camera, but its bulk and weight make it the obvious superior choice for bikepacking and backpacking.

    Photos taken with are on my site, Julian Bender - Travels and Photos, under "bikepacking" and "photography" (2012 albums only; I didn't have it before that)
    I also use a Powershot G series camera, mines a bit older though, a G9, but its still kicking strong. As jbphilly said, the manual controls allow for much better photos then a regluar P&S camera, and its not nearly as bulky as a DSLR.

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