Results 1 to 40 of 40
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    62

    Bivy/Tent? What's the deal?

    I don't know, maybe I'm a camping weenie but I just can't get my head around a bivy set up. What do you guys do about insects and critters and stuff? I could think of nothing worse than a night trying to sleep with the buzzing of mosquitos and gnats all around.



    How do you do it?

  2. #2
    What day are we riding?
    Reputation: Rockin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,088
    Bivy with netting either integrated or separate. I usually try to tie it up to something to keep it off my face.

    Also I like to use a Wenzel Starlite that I modded new poles for out of carbon arrows and lighter stakes. It is about one pound of penalty.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    62
    This internet thingie is pretty cool when looking for stuff.....found this, which seems to answer all of my questions.

    Bivy/Tent? What's the deal?-marmot-meshbivy.jpg

    Mesh Bivy | Marmot Clothing and Equipment

    Guess I'll be picking this up this weekend.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    54
    Bivy when I'm by myself and I bring a tent with the girlfriend comes along. I normally bike till late get off the bike quick eat and crash. But with the girlfriend its more camping and less biking

  5. #5
    A guy on a bike Moderator
    Reputation: TobyGadd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    951
    Bivies are lighter, which equates to a more enjoyable day of riding. At night, they are cozy and warm--and I feel more "connected" to the land around me.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 05kas05's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    274
    So which bivies would you guys recommend? As of now I have been using an rei chrysalis tent for my car camping trips but I would like to get a bivy before my first bike packing trip . Any suggestions are appreciated.
    surly karate monkey
    surly ogre

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jstews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    118
    The bivy is what keeps the critters out, otherwise it's just sleeping under a tarp or cowboy camping.

    For real lightweight stuff theres a lot of great bivys from a lot of great cottage companies.

    I've got a Katabatic Bivys ę Katabatic Gear ? Ultralight Sleeping Bags and Accessories

    A few more off the top of my head..
    Mountain Laurel Designs
    Borah Gear: Custom Ultralight Backpacking Gear
    TiGoat Ptarmigan Bivy

  8. #8
    banned
    Reputation: random walk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,666
    I haven't had a chance to use it yet, but I have a Integral Designs Bugabivy which weighs 16.5 oz, complete (468 g). I have thought about replacing the burly aluminum half-hoop pole (~4 oz) with something like a Delrin rod to save weight. The pole is really only used to keep the netting off your face. I got this used from geartrade.com for a pretty good price.

    If you're going to have wet weather, you'll need a tarp system for a bivy like this.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    347
    Quote Originally Posted by GtownViking View Post
    This internet thingie is pretty cool when looking for stuff.....found this, which seems to answer all of my questions.

    Mesh Bivy | Marmot Clothing and Equipment

    Guess I'll be picking this up this weekend.
    That almost looks like more of a minimalist tent to me.

    I have used a Eureka Solitaire for motorcycle camping trips. It packs slightly smaller. It is waterproof (when you tape the seams). I spent the night in a thunderstorm in NM with no leakage. It weighs about 1 pound more. It has a very slightly larger floor. It costs slightly less.

    Eureka Eureka Solitaire Tent - Camping Tents

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Eazy_E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,564
    Quote Originally Posted by GtownViking View Post
    This internet thingie is pretty cool when looking for stuff.....found this, which seems to answer all of my questions.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	marmot-meshbivy.jpg 
Views:	6385 
Size:	25.7 KB 
ID:	811300

    Mesh Bivy | Marmot Clothing and Equipment

    Guess I'll be picking this up this weekend.
    What do you do when it rains?

    It's 1lb 4 oz. For less than a pound more and for the same cost, you're in Tarptent territory and that's an actual, legit tent that can be rained or snowed on.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Outsider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    669
    I prefer a tent during the summer. We have three months with lots of mosquitoes, and my Tarptent Double Rainbow isn't too heavy (1.2 kg) and still provides open bug free views.

    My bike blog: www.yetirides.com

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rose_bud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    2

    Cool-blue Rhythm Pretty neat!

    Quote Originally Posted by GtownViking View Post
    This internet thingie is pretty cool when looking for stuff.....found this, which seems to answer all of my questions.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	marmot-meshbivy.jpg 
Views:	6385 
Size:	25.7 KB 
ID:	811300

    Mesh Bivy | Marmot Clothing and Equipment

    Guess I'll be picking this up this weekend.
    This one is good for the crickets and ants and all the other creepy crawlies. But rain may get you in the face.

    Still I am planning to have one of these. If it's not too heavy.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    112
    Check out a Contrail tarptent. It only weighs 26 oz (including the pole), so it is around the same weight as a lot of bivies (though heavier some bivies as well), and packs small on the bike. It has the benefits of a tent (keeps you dry while no worry about the bivy flap/mesh in your face since their is plenty of room). It only takes 1- 2 minutes to setup, w/o need for trees (unlike tarps). Anyway, it comes down to personal preference and balancing your needs for a particular type of trip.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,600
    i've looked at and used:
    tent, hammock (hennessy), tarp + bivy, and tarptent.

    currently my setup is a tarptent contrail. it fits multiple uses for me - hiking i can use my trekking poles, riding it fits nicely between drop bars (additional pole strapped to TT), and its stout enough in rain / wind to be useful. i can sit up inside to get dressed, and i'm protected from (this year) the persistent mosquitos. this is lighter than most readily available bivies and bivy tarp combos. lighter than my hennessy, way lighter than my old backpacking tent. and packs small and is ~24-26 oz. for me, the right blend of features. if i were on a drop bar bike i'd have the moment, as i'd pack it long ways up front. the contrail can pack it up front (drop bars), in my frame bag, or in my seat bag.


    my tarp tent contrail by mbeganyi, on Flickr


    IMAG4272 by mbeganyi, on Flickr

  15. #15
    A guy on a bike Moderator
    Reputation: TobyGadd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    951
    Sierra Designs P.A.W. 15 ounces, with bug netting. Sierra Designs P.A.W. 4-Season Technical Ultralight Alpine Bivy
    Marmot Alpinist Bivy: 14 ounces, without bug netting. Alpinist Bivy | Marmot Clothing and Equipment

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jstews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    118
    Those waterproof bivies are more aimed at alpinists. The full waterproofing would only do you any good if you intended to forgo a tarp in inclement weather, which is not a pleasant way to spend a night in a bivy. Also the waterproof materials are going to be far less breathable than a DWR coated nylon, quite unpleasant on a warm night.

    You can get a tarp and a bivy for around the same weight as the above bivys and have a much more versatile shelter system.

  17. #17
    A guy on a bike Moderator
    Reputation: TobyGadd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    951
    Quote Originally Posted by Jstews View Post
    Those waterproof bivies are more aimed at alpinists. The full waterproofing would only do you any good if you intended to forgo a tarp in inclement weather, which is not a pleasant way to spend a night in a bivy. Also the waterproof materials are going to be far less breathable than a DWR coated nylon, quite unpleasant on a warm night.

    You can get a tarp and a bivy for around the same weight as the above bivys and have a much more versatile shelter system.
    Whatever, they work great for me. I own both, and they breathe pretty well. And, yes, I've slept through both fair and foul weather. There's no tarp & bivy setup that's as light.

  18. #18
    Slothful dirt hippie
    Reputation: verslowrdr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    2,745
    Where are you planning on doing most of your camping? Here in the NW the bug pressure in the mountains can get pretty ugly and crazy weather (snow even!) can show up any day of the year if you get high enough, hence most end up using a lightweight tent like bmike or hammock w/ built in bug net.
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  19. #19
    Big B's Trails
    Reputation: ImaFred's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,724
    I have used this bug bivy(Outdoor Research Bug Bivy - Free Shipping at REI.com) with success especially when it's been on the warmer side . I also have a real bivy(4 season) that is for trips that I might encounter fun weather. I've also tried eno hammocks, I'm kinda on the fence with my sleep system....lately it's been, lots trees on route then hammock, if desert terrain or high alpine then the bivys.
    I dig dirt!

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    62
    [QUOTE=Eazy_E;10495103]

    What do you do when it rains?

    QUOTE]

    Hmmm, rain....yes, I see your point. That would be a 13 on the Suckage meter.

    I guess I need to educate myself a little more on this tarptent thingie. I've only seen tarps spread over the sleeping bag and that does not keep the insects out.

    Obviously the point is to to be as light as possible. I have a solo tent by Kelty, the Acadia 1 (now discontinued). It's the same as the current Acadia 2 which means it has 2 doors on it whereas mine has 1.
    Kelty Acadia 2-Person 3-Season Tent | Family Camping Gear

    Packed weight for mine is the same as the 2 which is 7.5 pounds and packed dimensions are 7"x24"...not exactly bikepack 'freindly' in both regards.

    I guess I could use the Marmot bivy above and carry some Tyvek moisture barrier (for houses). Seen that done.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    62
    Oh good Grief.....well isn't this the shizzle.

    Meta? 1P Tent | NEMO

    ONly question is, other than trekking poles, what can be used that collapses to a decent bikepacking dimension?

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,600
    T
    Quote Originally Posted by GtownViking View Post
    Oh good Grief.....well isn't this the shizzle.

    Meta? 1P Tent | NEMO

    ONly question is, other than trekking poles, what can be used that collapses to a decent bikepacking dimension?

    Make your own. Light. Pretty cheap. I bought the one that came with the Contrail but decided I wanted something stiffer, so I made one that was a little thicker gauge material. All parts came from Quest outfitters.

  23. #23
    banned
    Reputation: random walk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,666
    If you're going to go the bug shelter + tarp route, consider the Yama Mountain Gear Bug Shelter 1 and the Stratiform 1P tarp. $225 for the pair, new (hard to find used). I have this for backpacking and use trekking poles, but if you're creative and camping in the right places you can use trees & sticks to set it up. With tent, tarp, stakes and guylines, mine is around 20 oz.

    If you're a big person there is a Bug Shelter 1.25 and Stratiform 1P+ tarp.

    edit: You should be able to make a sectioned pole out of short lengths of thinwall tubular aluminum, so that the individual pieces are short enough to fit into your frame, seat or handlebar bag. Saw a "+" vertically through one end of each piece so it fits into the uncut end of another when you squeeze the 4 quarters of the cut end together.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    42
    Out of curiosity if you're going to be spending $225 or so on a bivy / tarp system, why not just buy an ultra light tent for the same price and maybe .5lb weight penalty? I've seen big agnes fly creek UL1's going for $220 ish here and there on clearance online, why not get that, what advantage does a bivy + tarp have over the ultra light tent? The bivy alone I see, but once you start adding a tarp and poles, seems easier to just get a ultra light tent and call it a day. I understand the ultimate ultralight concept, but for not racing why not just use a UL tent?

  25. #25
    banned
    Reputation: random walk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,666
    ^^^Of course that's another alternative. I was just speaking on the products I own/use.

    Although I can say my hiking buddy has that BA Fly Creek UL1 and loves it.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    9,106
    Quote Originally Posted by isignay View Post
    Out of curiosity if you're going to be spending $225 or so on a bivy / tarp system, why not just buy an ultra light tent for the same price and maybe .5lb weight penalty?
    +1 - My UL tent weights the same as my bivy. I've stopped using the bivy very often. The tent is more comfortable and breathes better.

    The bivy packs down slightly better and is more robust.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  27. #27
    I don't huck.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    2,548
    Insects are not a huge issue in the areas I live in, so I have a variety of systems to choose from. I began with a 1 man UL tent with a storm fly and that was not too bad but I always debated on fly or no fly, unless it was dead summer. If I did not have the storm fly pitched, I also had no 'porch' for gear stowing, but it was secure from crawlies, etc. The poles added up too.

    But I felt so isolated from the outdoors that it bothered me. So I picked up an REI bivy and used that on a few days of desert bikepacking last year with great success. I loved the open feeling...stars, etc. Even wind was easy to deal with but bugs were not an issue.

    I also picked up a shaped/cut tarp on closeout (Sil Shelter) and it basically is a single wall tent with no floor. Very secure in rain, etc and gives me storage/comfort but breathes well if you pitch it right. If I use the bivy inside it, I also have a bug free cocoon to sleep in. I converted it to a-frame poles as I hated the center pole set up. Added to weight though so Easton poles are in the plans or I could tie it up to something if the terrain allowed.

    I want to buy or make a sil-tarp that pitches over my head and shoulders where the mesh is on the bivy. If I use the front wheel of my bike for a support, I would not need any poles.

    Frankly I would suggest a Tarp tent from the beginning as it does all this almost perfectly and is a god send in buggy areas. I have to admit that the bivy, even though it is actually heavier and bulkier than the sil shelter, is my fav as it gives me that feeling of being 'out there' and less squirreled away, at least in good weather. I like the snug cocooned feel but some do not. i also use a quilt and that works well with a bivy sack.

    All this does give me a lot of flexibility though. Bivy. Bivy + Sil Shelter. One man tent. Tent + bivy for really cold nights.
    Blog Ramblings
    West Coast writer for twentynineinches.com

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    2,853
    I looked through this thread and I didn't see any mention of the Zpacks tent. Lighter than all tents and lighter than most bivys: If I were to start from scratch this is what I would get!: ZPacks.com Ultralight Backpacking Gear - Hexamid Solo-Plus Cuben Fiber Tent
    I know some people that have this tent and they love it.
    I have a tarptent notch and I have used that on the Tour Divide. Nice light tent with plenty of tarp space and can be set up as a bug shelter without the tarp. A little cramped. Their Contrail gives more room and is a few ounces lighter: Tarptent Ultralight Shelters
    I also bought an REI bivy. Like it for quick and easy set up, but you would be screwed in a rainstorm without a tarp. To me packing a bivy and a tarp seems to be too heavy an option, so I would just pack the Tarptent notch if I expected foul weather or a plethora of bugs.
    Still jonesing for the Zpacks tent though. In retrospect I should have just bought it and been done with it since I now have almost as much money in my tent and bivy. Anyone want to buy a notch in nice condition and an REI bivy??? Ha ha!

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jstews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    118
    I don't have any experience with the hexamid tents but I've used a Zpacks tarp with great success for 30+ nights out. 5 oz for a tarp is hard to argue with, and while seemingly fringe, cuben fiber has some great benefits.

  30. #30
    banned
    Reputation: random walk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,666
    Quote Originally Posted by mtroy View Post
    I want to buy or make a sil-tarp that pitches over my head and shoulders where the mesh is on the bivy. If I use the front wheel of my bike for a support, I would not need any poles.
    Interesting idea.

    I was thinking of doing the reverse, where you have a full-length tarp and bring just enough no-see-um netting to drape over you from head to chest. The netting would attach to a few points on the underside of the tarp, mainly to keep it off your face.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    552
    I donít have issues with bugs where I live, fortunately, so I use a lightweight tarp. It can be set up in a variety of ways depending on temperature, wind, etc. I love it for the simplicity and variations for setup. I do not use any poles, just trees or the bike and that seems to afford me all I need (even if I have no trees around). But Kelty and some other companies do make tarp poles that break down to short enough lengths to stow on the bike. I have never used any, though, so I canít recommend a certain brand.

    If I had to deal with insects, I would consider making one of these tarptents by Henry Shires: Henry Shires' Tarptent Same company that makes the Contrail, etc. so you could opt to buy one of their manufactured ones if you have the cash. Even soloing with the two person version is pretty darn light. And if you have company, even better.

    I donít always have the luxury of trees, or at least trees that are close enough together, so I have not considered the hammock option. Those are similarly equipped with most everything you need, depending on the version you get. Bug netting, fly, etc. all is possible. And if you know what to expect on a trip, you can just take what you need and save even more weight.

    All that being said, I went bikepacking with my son in April and used a two person Kelty tent without a fly that I picked up for $15. Split the weight between us and it was fine (heís only 12 and survived). I knew it wasnít going to rain, so I didnít have to bring the fly. The poles stuck out the end of my rack, but it was no problem. Use what you got and improve as you go.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    487
    Quote Originally Posted by isignay View Post
    Out of curiosity if you're going to be spending $225 or so on a bivy / tarp system, why not just buy an ultra light tent for the same price and maybe .5lb weight penalty? I've seen big agnes fly creek UL1's going for $220 ish here and there on clearance online, why not get that, what advantage does a bivy + tarp have over the ultra light tent? The bivy alone I see, but once you start adding a tarp and poles, seems easier to just get a ultra light tent and call it a day. I understand the ultimate ultralight concept, but for not racing why not just use a UL tent?
    Theres different reasons to bivy.
    Whilst cycle touring here in Australia, sometimes the only place to put your head down is amongst scrub on the side of the road. The scrub can sometimes not allow a big enough footprint to allow the pitching of a tent. Its not usually hard to find enough room however to plonk your self down using the bivy. My one is E-vent with a Torrentwear Light floor fabric (5,000mm HH) and incorporates an insect mesh in the hood area. Its made by New Zealand company Macpac and I believe I got their last green one. Bivvy bag - eVent fabric - Max breathability and waterproofness - Bivouac sack | Macpac
    I've also got two of their tents (Microlight and Minaret) and two differing weight down sleeping bags. Two of their packs (90liter and a 28 liter) and varies clothing items.
    For stealth camping, nothing beats my green bivy bag. I've slept in many different places and some of them would be frowned upon so I'll not go into detail. Suffice to say, put down at night and packed up before the light of dawn without anyone being the wiser. I'd give up my tents before I'd ever consider giving up the versatility of my bivy-bag.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    988
    Name:  DSCN4889.JPG
Views: 2214
Size:  90.7 KB
    I love my hammock with integrated mosquito net. I bought it second hand and it has no branding, but there are a bunch of ideas out there. As with all mosquito netting solutions, turn off your light and let bugs dissipate before going in or out.

    It's like a 2 story setup. I can leave gear and my bike under me where things stay fairly dry. They will get splattered some if it rains hard, but its also nice to be able to stand up nearly straight while packing up to leave camp during rain.
    Last edited by PretendGentleman; 07-07-2013 at 07:20 AM.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: evdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,275
    Quote Originally Posted by isignay View Post
    Out of curiosity if you're going to be spending $225 or so on a bivy / tarp system, why not just buy an ultra light tent for the same price and maybe .5lb weight penalty? I've seen big agnes fly creek UL1's going for $220 ish here and there on clearance online, why not get that, what advantage does a bivy + tarp have over the ultra light tent? The bivy alone I see, but once you start adding a tarp and poles, seems easier to just get a ultra light tent and call it a day. I understand the ultimate ultralight concept, but for not racing why not just use a UL tent?
    I have both the BA Fly Creek UL1 and an Outdoor Research Bivy. I like them both a lot, and my choice of which to take comes down to circumstances. They both weigh about 2lbs and take up roughly the same space. The bivy being one piece vs 3 piece for the tent (poles, fly, tent) the tent is more flexible in how it can be packed. But the bivy is easier/quicker to set up or pack up.

    I usually bring the tent if there is a good chance of rain. My bivy wouldn't be fun to hang out in for hours while you wait out a storm. I can at least sit up in the tent and move around a bit.

    Most of the time though I use the bivy. It is warmer than my tent and like others said if it is nice out I just pull back the top and sleep open to the stars. It has bug mesh too so if mozzies are out I just zip up the mesh. And if it does rain unexpectedly the bivy is waterproof and I just zip up the top.

    I also use the bivy a lot for car camping road trips when I am moving place to place because of how quick it is to pack up. I just let 1/2 the air out of the sleeping pad and I can fold the whole thing up and throw it in the back seat. 10 seconds, I'm packed up and ready to drive away.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    133
    disregard the el-cheapo bike in these pics; I have this tent and black bag for it; total weight of bag with tent, sleep pad, and sleeping bag, 14 pounds.. the bag is rather large on the bike; due to the fact I put the sleeping bag and sleep roll in it and rolled it all together...its rather useful; since it means that much less hassle getting things out of individual bags; and it also doubles as a bike shelter; for theft/vandalism prevention.
    currently though I've been giving more thought to a bivy/tarp combination for the weight savings...and the fact that with tarp/bivy, I could basically unroll them from a smaller bag and set it up quick if I have two trees close together for the tarps...if not; I would use the aluminum poles I have and turn the tarp into a lean-to shelter



  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    552

    Bivy/Tent? What's the deal?

    Quote Originally Posted by CamoDeafie View Post
    currently though I've been giving more thought to a bivy/tarp combination for the weight savings...and the fact that with tarp/bivy, I could basically unroll them from a smaller bag and set it up quick if I have two trees close together for the tarps...if not; I would use the aluminum poles I have
    There are some clever ways to use the bike itself to support a tarp instead of carrying poles. You really just need one support point to attach a corner to (tree or bike or pole) Then anchor the diagonal corner to the ground with a stake. Anchor the other two corners with stakes and guy lines (if necessary - I often just stake them to the ground directly if weather is an issue) and you are done.

    Here I used a tree but the bike would have worked as well. I used the bike as a wind and rain block by attaching my rain jacket to it and parking it (upside down) on one side of the entrance.

    Bivy/Tent? What's the deal?-imageuploadedbytapatalk1374622569.922265.jpg

    Bivy/Tent? What's the deal?-imageuploadedbytapatalk1374622648.602886.jpg

    Bivy/Tent? What's the deal?-imageuploadedbytapatalk1374622668.819467.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    133
    now that's an idea.....hmm. here's what I've been experimenting with; in 90 degree days;


    its an old wal-mart camo tarp; 9x7 approximately; with 6 grommets on the long side, and 5 on the short side; I folded it in such a way that it has 3 grommets from pole to ground; and put in an old sleeping bag in between the folded material; for insulation; it works pretty good; using the aluminum poles from the Stansport "backpackers" A-frame tent. essentially it's a modified lean-to shelter; but if i forgo the insulating; for the nights, I would have it set up such that the ground is covered by the tarp half(ish) and thus negate the need for a separate ground cover.
    here's what they were packed in today; front USGI 3 day pack holds the sleeping bag portion; and the ground cover/tarp/poles are all rolled up and attached to the bottom;

    there's like 2 inches between the bottommost part and the tire; I am seriously thinking that I would feel safer having a front rack.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    552
    That looks pretty sharp! I've done something similar to this setup, but with one tree and the bike. I also used a much larger tarp (12X9) and no ground cloth. I fold it over like an envelope so I sleep on part of the tarp. Works quite well, but the tarp was a basic Home Depot type utility tarp and after a few trips I decided I wanted something lighter and that packed smaller. But for starting out, it was great as I already owned it. If it were a two-person trip, the weight is a little more justified and you can modify the setup to have a smaller overhang and more ground cloth space.

    Check it out:

    Bivy/Tent? What's the deal?-tarp-setup-.jpg

    Bivy/Tent? What's the deal?-tarp-setup-b.jpg

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    133
    Wahday; nice set-up! here's what I experimented with last night after grocery run and such...
    this one; kind of inspired by your diamond set up; but folded in half to provide ground cover;


    there's enough room for me to lay down and it's pretty comfortable!
    and here's a couple variations; to the diamond one; one has a pole at one end to provide more breeze, its more of a sun shelter than a tarp-tent, and the other, deletes the pole, and is set up same as your diamond shape; its got enough space for 2 people plus their gear; this is using a single tree instead of the bicycle or the pole




    the size of this tarp is such that if one were to do a lean-to without ground cover, it would be a tall shelter with room enough to stand up in and have shade and wind blocking, if it uses two trees or two long universal poles instead.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    552
    Looks like you've got it nailed! If you haven't found it already, check out "tarpology" - profiles seemingly endless ways of setting up tarps of different dimensions.

    I'm fortunate to live in a place that doesn't really have bug issues. But if I did, I would probably just add some kind of netted bivy, or something like MLD's Bug Bivy. The tarp is just so darn light and adaptable its hard to imagine using anything else.

Similar Threads

  1. Warm weather Bivy or Ultralight tent
    By Saucyjack in forum Bikepacking and Bike Expedition
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 06-14-2012, 06:37 PM
  2. F.A.T.S. Tent camping?
    By GatorB in forum Southeast/Midsouth - GA, TN, AL, FL, MS, LA, AR
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-04-2012, 05:21 PM
  3. What Bivy Bag Are you Using?
    By leadhead in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-04-2012, 06:22 PM
  4. Best Tent Waterproofer?
    By ProjectDan35 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-25-2011, 07:35 PM
  5. Recommend Me a Tent
    By wookie in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 03-22-2011, 08:19 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •