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  1. #51
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    Nevermind, I just found a vid of Tom hennessy himself demonstrating the Hennessy "kitchen"

  2. #52
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    I'm building a custom ultralight hammock right now for a guy that's doing the AT in 2013, looking really good. Based on the Warbonnet design but lightening it up for him in certain areas. Should be really sweet...
    Clipless sucks...

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    Same planet, I think.
    "This insect-killing repellent for your clothing is effective against ticks, chiggers, mites and mosquitoes for up to six weeks."
    Word on the streets is that they land on it and take off again right away, rather than sticking around and biting. But it sounds like your experience is otherwise.
    Mosquito Net Permethrin (Camping & Outdoor Equipment / Mosquito nets, netting and repellents / Insect Netting BedNets)

    Yes, my experience is different. I use permethrin extensively on my clothing for ticks. It can be worthwhile to coat some gear with it to eliminate the hitchhikers that wind up biting you in the car when you're driving home (been there, done that).

    But not once has Permethrin alone been of any use at all to me for mosquitoes. Some of them might get up and fly away, but it's not enough of a deterrent for quite a few of them, and you will still be bitten. It MIGHT kill most of the ones that land on you, but not until after you've been bitten.

    I have had better luck with a number of other repellents for mosquitoes, but using them on gear has been met with mixed results. I haven't encountered too many repellent sprays that are worth anything for more than a couple hours. That won't get you a whole night's undisturbed rest without bites.

    A physical barrier is really the only way to go. A double layer hammock with an integrated bug net will do the job. So will a hammock with a separate bug net that encompasses the whole hammock (like the ENO bugnet (even though it's heavy) and the Warbonnet Traveler bugnet - it's relatively easy to make one of these for yourself, too).

    The Byer moskito hammock won't be enough to stop bites through the bottom. if you use one, you'll have to have something underneath you like a sleeping pad even when it's hot to stave off the bites.

    As for circulation, it's an interesting thing. I used my hammock in Costa Rica in March and I had a nice hanging spot on a hill overlooking the Pacific in the distance. It got pretty durned windy at times. The bugnet blocked an awful lot of the heavy wind. But even with a light breeze, I could feel air circulation around me. The conductive heat loss through the bottom of the hammock is a huge advantage on hot nights, but it requires special attention with an underquilt or pad when it's cool. There are folks who hammock even in the dead of winter, and a huge tarp can really help with that. You can pitch the tarp like an a-frame tent with the edges on the ground, and with the right tarp cut, you can even close off the open ends to block even the light breezes.

  4. #54
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    I made my own for half the price. Got a lot of info from hammockforums. The bug net zips almost completely off and goes in a stuff sack at the foot when not needed.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/rckdaniel/6096845873/" title="IMG_1317 by rckdaniel, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6012/6096845873_c042d88e1c.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="IMG_1317"></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/rckdaniel/6097396552/" title="IMG_1323 by rckdaniel, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6065/6097396552_099422140b.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="IMG_1323"></a>

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by YukonLT View Post
    You will find so many places that you could never put a tent, and you will get a better nights rest.
    I had never thought about the flexibility of where you can put a hammock until I started looking at photos at hammockforums.net of people hanging over water, rocks, etc.
    In the photo below, there were 30+ Boy Scouts in a field 50ft behind me when I took the photo. There would have been no way for them to tent in the woods due to the lack of clear flat ground. And they roasted all night while I was comfy and cool with just a slight breeze.

    Quote Originally Posted by RiderInTraining View Post
    +1 for the Warbonnet
    +2 - I'm digging my Warbonnet Blackbird setup. I started down the hammock road due to a backpacking trip. But around here and for me, I can't think of a better setup for bikepacking.

    jw
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bikepacking hammocks-bscampout_june2012.jpg  

    Last edited by GrumpyOne; 06-26-2012 at 02:07 PM.
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  6. #56
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    Great thread! I hope to start getting into bikepacking in the next year or so (I've been drooling over the Salsa Mukluk and like the idea of using it for this purpose and winter riding). I've been particularly interested in hammocks, but wasn't sure how their banana shape would agree with my back. I saw a great video review of this on Backpacker.com. Has anyone else had any experience with this product?
    Bear Mountain Bridge Hammock – Deluxe | Jacksrbetter

  7. #57
    gran jefe
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    will it actually lay flat with a person in it? interesting design. i don't trust it.

    my back feels better after a night in a hammock than after a night on the ground. do you live around here? i'll let you borrow one.

  8. #58
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    Love my Blackbird Warbonnet and Grand Trunk Ultrlight!!!!

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by petey15 View Post
    Great thread! I hope to start getting into bikepacking in the next year or so (I've been drooling over the Salsa Mukluk and like the idea of using it for this purpose and winter riding). I've been particularly interested in hammocks, but wasn't sure how their banana shape would agree with my back. I saw a great video review of this on Backpacker.com. Has anyone else had any experience with this product?
    Bear Mountain Bridge Hammock – Deluxe | Jacksrbetter
    I have not tried the bear mountain bridge. I do have a homemade bridge hammock, which works well. All I can tell you is that the jacksrbetter guys are quite serious, do good design, and make good products.

  10. #60
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    Seems like every additional year I spend on this dirt ball, someone else I know succumbs to back injury. It was my turn in 2005 when my daughter was (reluctantly) born. I've now got some SI disk and nerve damage that causes sciatia that comes and goes. I used to be able to sleep anywhere on minimal padding, but these days even a BA air pad on the ground can result in very little (if any) sleep and severe pain the next morning.

    Experiments so far indicate my back is waaay better after a night in the hammock than in my own bed. This is a HUGE breakthrough, as I'd thought that my days of camping might be terminated. I have a Grand Trunk for experiments, on the back porch, etc but a few weeks ago got a Blackbird.

    I'm all for simple and light, but biking hard + getting no sleep + tying to get screaming body parts to function before I've even had coffee is a fekking torture. Since my PTO is measured down to 2 decimal points I'm not gonna waste it on that action. I'll gratefully carry the hammock and all its bits.
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by petey15 View Post
    ... I've been particularly interested in hammocks, but wasn't sure how their banana shape would agree with my back. I saw a great video review of this on Backpacker.com. Has anyone else had any experience with this product?
    Bear Mountain Bridge Hammock – Deluxe | Jacksrbetter
    I can't comment on the Bear Mountain Bridge really, but it seems overkill. I use the Blackbird Warbonnet for years and even though you're not laying completely level, I sleep better in it then anywhere else. That includes my own bed as well. If I sleep to long in my bed my lower back hurts in the morning, not so in my hammock. I would actually hang one in my bed room if it wasn't for my wife.
    I'm Confused . . . Wait a Minute, No I'm Not . . .

  12. #62
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    Wow - lots of great information - thanks! Here in the east, our abundance of trees shouldn't make a place to hang one a problem. Does anyone have experience with hammocks in very windy conditions? Has anyone ever staked them to the ground to help stabilize them? It seems that most prefer the more traditionally shaped hammocks to those like the Lawson that have more flat bottoms (though they do seem very tippy).

  13. #63
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    The Blackbird has stake-outs to keep it from swinging around if you choose to deploy them. Having a little bit of swing is oddly mesmerizing though.

    I suspect the shape of the bottom is more dependent on how you've rigged it up and how diagonally you're lying.
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  14. #64
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    I love combining two hobbies like hammock camping and bikepacking.

    Lunchtime bikeride, lunch, and nap.



    Overnite


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  15. #65
    gran jefe
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    Quote Originally Posted by petey15 View Post
    Wow - lots of great information - thanks! Here in the east, our abundance of trees shouldn't make a place to hang one a problem. It seems that most prefer the more traditionally shaped hammocks to those like the Lawson that have more flat bottoms (though they do seem very tippy).
    If you look at SingleTrackLovr's "overnight" photo, you can see that the sides are pretty high. Mine has a similar shape. Rolling out of mine would require a serious effort, and isn't a problem when you move around at night or when you get in or out. Would you agree, STL? I have had all kind of kids and uncoordinated grownups in and out of mine, and have never had someone get dumped on the ground.

    I have never known anyone who had one of those suspension bridge hammocks.

    And you are right about it being easy to find a spot to hang. You can hang on all kinds of sideslopes and rocky places where a tent would be miserable. Plus, you don't squish all the vegetation, so if you like the LNT stuff, hammocks are good at that.

  16. #66
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    FWIW the GT Ultralight is really narrow, and the one time I slept overnight in it I just threw in the BA square pad + Marmot Helium sleeping bag. My back loved it but the whole ginormous pile of bag & pad threatened to ooze out over the side/end, lol. I probably could have mitigated this effect somewhat by raising the foot end more, but realistically a kit that bulky probably needs more than 54" wide.

    I threw the exact same lashup into a borrowed ENO doublenest and had leftover fabric floating around at 74" wide. No escape issues however.

    The Blackbird is 65" wide and from what I've seen and heard it should be a happy medium. A bug net is mandatory for most of our mountain travels anyway.
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  17. #67
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    This is so cool! I hadn't heard of camping hammocks before checking out this forum. They seem to have so many more benefits to regular tent camping. Not that I have to worry about this much in the NE, but what about when camping in bear or mountain lion territory? Does anyone feel more secure in their hammock? Obviously you undergo the same precautions you would whenever you camp. I think I read somewhere about it being the perfect "bear toy", LOL, something to bat at between the trees...

  18. #68
    gran jefe
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    people have suggested that a hammock looks like a giant burrito to a bear.

    i expect that a tent might be microscopically safer than a hammock in bear country.

  19. #69
    Dudette
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    people have suggested that a hammock looks like a giant burrito to a bear.

    i expect that a tent might be microscopically safer than a hammock in bear country.

    I had a friend suggest to me today that a hammock is a lot more ergonomically correct for the animals that wish to dine by putting you at mouth level

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by petey15 View Post
    I had a friend suggest to me today that a hammock is a lot more ergonomically correct for the animals that wish to dine by putting you at mouth level
    Have you pointed out to him that carnivores typically eat their meal off the ground?!?

    Here in central Wa we have a LOT of cats and they tend to be fairly densely populated due to the sheer quantity of game they have available, and I usually run across cat tracks on my lunch hour rides a few times a year on the ridge behind town. A few years ago I tangled up with a cougar while running my dog team at night, which got a little 'invigorating' but was resolved with a lot of cussing and rock-chucking. Washington state allows cougar hunting and biologists in the region have used hounds to tree quite a few for studies (tree-tanq-drop-record-collar). IMO this probably mitigates human/cat conflicts to at least some degree and allows the overall population to thrive, but that's another topic....

    Our prolific black bears take town-trolling a step further and dine on apples, prunes, pears, etc. right from people's yards, usually at night. If you see one in daylight it's always just a very large hairy butt running away. They get hunted as well and tend to stay out of trouble on their own.

    I am NOT worried about these critters. It's people that concerns me, hence my drive to get the heck away from them.

    And to answer the eternal question... yes, the pope is catholic.
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  21. #71
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    I love hammock camping but the dirty little secret that hammockers won't tell you about from the outset is bottom insulation. Sure, you technically "can" use an pad and many have, with varying degrees of sucess, but the reality is at somepoint you're going too realize you need/want an underquilt. Here's the bummer, they start at around $175 for a good down model. Keep that in mind before you jump into it. Also, when you get down to it, they're heavier than their ground dwelling counterparts. So I suggest that you try and sleep a few nights in a cheap, single layer hammock before you jump all the way into it.

    That being said, here's my DIY hammock setup. I had a Hennessy Hammock but didn't like it. My recommendation would be a Warbonnet Blackbird or a Switchback.




  22. #72
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    I have to agree with most of what thesargent says.

    My Warbonnet Yeti underquilt is my good buddy in any temperature below 60 degrees F. You can use a sleeping bag as a top quilt, but the under-quilt is not very negotiable if you are going to be comfortable.

    I disagree slightly about weight. With lightweight suspension and down gear, a complete cold-weather hammock rig is about the same as an ultralight ground-dwelling tarptent.

    Oh, and make sure you add the high-power flashlight to the cost. The astute hammock camper always surveys the upper canopy to check for dead limbs.

  23. #73
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    These are both more generic hammock questions, but there's a distinct lack of in-store places selling hammocks so I haven't had a chance to find out for myself.

    I find that my feet get very, very cold if I have them too elevated above my heart. I'm 5'11.5" tall but 210 lbs; given the sag factor of hammocks I am a little cautious on looking in to hammocks lest I end up with a comfortable sleep but frozen feet. Thoughts/comments/anyone else have this issue?

    Second question related to this is regarding what DavyRay and thesergeant say, the underquilt is there to provide under-body thermal insulation. Most emergency blankets (the reflective kind) pack down really light and small, but reflect body heat back. Could something like the heavy duty Sol Emergency blanket be a suitable alternative?

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter006 View Post
    ...Second question related to this is regarding what DavyRay and thesergeant say, the underquilt is there to provide under-body thermal insulation. Most emergency blankets (the reflective kind) pack down really light and small, but reflect body heat back. Could something like the heavy duty Sol Emergency blanket be a suitable alternative?
    It can be part of a solution, but isn't nearly enough insulation by itself.

    I've been trading ideas on line with a local backpacker who like me discovered his back preferred the hammock so much that he started with some experiments to get it to work. It's a handy relationship since he's got more money for gear and time to fiddle with it, I just take what he's learned and go from there, lol. Anyway, he has a downmat 7 and added an underquilt this summer, and unlike a lot of other folks he went back to the downmat- less fiddle, less bulk, and can throw it on the ground if he has to. BUT, he modded his Blackbird with a pocket in the footbox to shove the mat into so it stays in place.

    This fall I tore apart a SOL thermal bivy, turned one side upside down so the tapered foot is next to a head end, and duct taped it together to make a big rectangle blanket. I also used fabric repair tape to make some loops on the edge of my BA pad. Next spring I'll be doing some experiments with this lashup in multiple configurations, the idea being that the thermal bivy blanket + maybe some extra clothing that's always along can provide some shoulder insulation/windblock if needed. And if I get caught out in our vast sagebrush 'desert' without suitable trees, I can throw the blanket down under the pad as a ground sheet.
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  25. #75
    gran jefe
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    I've used a hammock with a closed cell pad as my bottom insulation down to about 30 degrees without taking any heroic measures, and I'm not some kind of cold weather tough guiy, either.

    Quote Originally Posted by hunter006 View Post
    I find that my feet get very, very cold if I have them too elevated above my heart. I'm 5'11.5" tall but 210 lbs; given the sag factor of hammocks I am a little cautious on looking in to hammocks lest I end up with a comfortable sleep but frozen feet. Thoughts/comments/anyone else have this issue?
    You will probably want some booties or loose very fluffy socks of some kind. A guy I know who has poor circulation admits that booties are a must for him.

    And, yeah, in a race to super-ultralight, hammocks probably lose. I have seen pics of an ultralight rig that was a silnylon poncho rigged to enclose 3 sides of a tyvek groundcloth, using a narrow quilt as cover, and no pad to sleep on. So, yeah, if you can sleep like that, then, yeah, you will beat a hammock. OTOH, if you are looking for a little more comfort and can afford a underquilt and bag, you'll be competitive with lightweight groundsleepers pretty quickly.

  26. #76
    Syb
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesergeant View Post
    I love hammock camping but the dirty little secret that hammockers won't tell you about from the outset is bottom insulation. Sure, you technically "can" use an pad and many have, with varying degrees of sucess, but the reality is at somepoint you're going too realize you need/want an underquilt. Here's the bummer, they start at around $175 for a good down model. Keep that in mind before you jump into it.
    Our secret is out and yes, most of the population requires some sort of under insulation. My first underquilt was $100 and I combined that with my already-purchased sleeping bag and that got me down to 30 degrees. Full-length underquilts will cost you more money but just like our bikes, it's all personal preference. All this said, thesergeant brings up great points to keep in mind when/if you jump in to a hammock. And thesergeant, I really like that DIY Hennessy you made. I'm jealous of those thread-injecting skills.

    Me personally? **I pee on the ground, I don't sleep on it

    Quote Originally Posted by thesergeant View Post
    Also, when you get down to it, they're heavier than their ground dwelling counterparts. So I suggest that you try and sleep a few nights in a cheap, single layer hammock before you jump all the way into it.
    Hammock rigs can be lighter than a comparable tent in my experience but where I find you really save is the bulk. My hammock is 9 ounces, tarp is 13, underquilt is 24 ounces and top quilt 22. 4.25 pounds. This all fits nicely in my 2300 TNF bag with room to spare as the down compresses at the bottom of my pack and I throw heavier things on top. My tent is just under that weight but I'm still sleeping on the ground and need to find a way to fit it all in my pack. Yes, there are lighter/different tent setups out there but this is what I happen to have. See ** above.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    I've used a hammock with a closed cell pad as my bottom insulation down to about 30 degrees without taking any heroic measures, and I'm not some kind of cold weather tough guiy, either.

    You will probably want some booties or loose very fluffy socks of some kind. A guy I know who has poor circulation admits that booties are a must for him.

    And, yeah, in a race to super-ultralight, hammocks probably lose. I have seen pics of an ultralight rig that was a silnylon poncho rigged to enclose 3 sides of a tyvek groundcloth, using a narrow quilt as cover, and no pad to sleep on. So, yeah, if you can sleep like that, then, yeah, you will beat a hammock. OTOH, if you are looking for a little more comfort and can afford a underquilt and bag, you'll be competitive with lightweight groundsleepers pretty quickly.
    Very well said. I once saw a guy who carried two 6" X 6" pads, 1 for his shoulder and one for his hip. That, combined with his ground cloth and a sleeping bag and very small bivy was his sleeping/shelter rig. Was it light? Absolutely. Was it comfortable? Prolly not.

    Check out hammockforums.net and you'll get more information than you can imagine about all things hammock.
    Syb
    Enjoy the ride

  27. #77
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    I just added a 3rd hammock to my camping kit.
    This one is for winter and has a breathable top cover to block wind.
    Tarp and quilts are still required to stay dry and warm.

    It was custom built to my spec's. Made in the USA from here:
    Dream Hammock


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  28. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleTrackLovr View Post
    I just added a 3rd hammock to my camping kit.
    This one is for winter and has a breathable top cover to block wind.
    Tarp and quilts are still required to stay dry and warm.

    It was custom built to my spec's. Made in the USA from here:
    Dream Hammock
    One of Randy's Dangerbirds! I ordered tree straps, whoopies, and adjustable ridgeline from him. REALLY nice guy doing some very interesting things. His hammock sock is intriguing since we deal with a lot of wind.

    The zip-on Dangerbird cover is really clever. What did you have customized?
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  29. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleTrackLovr View Post
    I just added a 3rd hammock to my camping kit.
    This one is for winter and has a breathable top cover to block wind.
    Tarp and quilts are still required to stay dry and warm.

    It was custom built to my spec's. Made in the USA from here:
    Dream Hammock
    Schweet!
    Syb
    Enjoy the ride

  30. #80
    ColoradoCoolBreeze
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    Quote Originally Posted by verslowrdr View Post
    One of Randy's Dangerbirds! I ordered tree straps, whoopies, and adjustable ridgeline from him. REALLY nice guy doing some very interesting things. His hammock sock is intriguing since we deal with a lot of wind.

    The zip-on Dangerbird cover is really clever. What did you have customized?
    I started with his netted RomingGnome 11'x60" (1.8 tafata) and had him put a 1.0 ripstop cover vs netting on it. So no net this is a winter hammock.
    I had a second zipper pull added to one side so I could set a condensation vent at the top and be able to enter/exit on seperate zipper pulls.
    Randy names it The WinterGnome


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  31. #81
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    These are pretty cool. I might have to try and look into getting one. About how much?

  32. #82
    gran jefe
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    $20 tops if you make your own.

  33. #83
    ColoradoCoolBreeze
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    $20 tops if you make your own.
    2X
    If you're a DIY guys making your hammock camping kit can be a blast and for little money.

    Check out this post for a great DIY gathered end hammock.

    Instruction: Gathered End Hammock - Hammock Forums - Elevate Your Perspective

    The hammock pictures I posted above with the cover is a gathered end.

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  34. #84
    ColoradoCoolBreeze
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    deteted dup post sorry site is acting weird
    I keep getting 501 gateway time outs but then I see the post went thru.

    Bill from Houston I sent you a PM but got the same 501 error. Afraid to send it again
    don't want to spam your inbox.
    Last edited by SingleTrackLovr; 12-13-2012 at 08:00 AM.

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  35. #85
    gran jefe
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    i got it, thank you.

    need to watch that video on how to make the hammock later. i use a design with no sewing at all and want to see how similar the geometry is.

  36. #86
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    I use the ENO DoubleNest System. It does great for bikepacking, car camping and just general laziness around the house. I usually keep the hammock in the car and have used it at a friends house when he ran out of couch space. I know everybody loves to save a few ounces on an exetended tour, but I always prefer gear that fits into the rest of my life also.

  37. #87
    gran jefe
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleTrackLovr View Post
    2X
    If you're a DIY guys making your hammock camping kit can be a blast and for little money.

    Check out this post for a great DIY gathered end hammock.

    Instruction: Gathered End Hammock - Hammock Forums - Elevate Your Perspective

    The hammock pictures I posted above with the cover is a gathered end.
    The way I fold my hammock body material, I make the material on the sides a couple of inches shorter than the material at the centerline. For yours, do you do anything like that? Or is your material a big rectangle before you sew the sleeve in the end?

  38. #88
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    I'm planning to purchase DD Frontline Hammock from DDHammocks. Any thoughts on that? All I've heard have been praise. Price is decent 67 euros / 89 USD delivered to Finland.

    Next summer it's going to be some serious bikepacking-time!! I'm also planning to craft DIY framebag and seatbag for my Salsa Spearfish.

    Any thoughts on DIY-tarps?? DDHammock has some, but 48 euros / 64 USD for a tarp seems quite expensive for me..

  39. #89
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    $64 for a lightweight tarp is CHEAP! The least expensive silnylon I've been able to find was on Campmor, and I'd want at least 10' longways.

    Someone warned me about silnylon absorbing water though so I've held off on going that route. For right now I'm just trying a chunk of tyvek I bought off ebay... if I really get into this I might break down and get a cuben fiber tarp next year, but it's a hella chunk of change.
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  40. #90
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    Well, whats lightweight for a tarp? I really have no clue.
    DDHammock tarp should weight about 720 grams. Thats 3 m x 3m (9 ft x 9 ft).

    It says on their website: "The fabric is PU (3,000mm) coated polyester. Seams are taped."

    The DD Frontline Hammock is 820 gr + tarp 720 gr + webbing 230 gr = ~1770 grams.

  41. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    The way I fold my hammock body material, I make the material on the sides a couple of inches shorter than the material at the centerline. For yours, do you do anything like that? Or is your material a big rectangle before you sew the sleeve in the end?
    Hi Bill, I am banded from the family thread injector after attempting to sew two tree straps and broke the machine. It cost me 125 bucks to get the machine fixed.
    So i now have to rely on the mom and pop shops around the U.S. to do my sewing.

    More to your question. I believe the hammocks I have are cut to a rectangle 11'x60" and a channel is sewn in the ends for the rope (whoopie) to tree straps.

    Does your cutting of the corners help with a flatter lay when lying diagonal?

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  42. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaakku View Post
    I'm planning to purchase DD Frontline Hammock from DDHammocks. Any thoughts on that? All I've heard have been praise. Price is decent 67 euros / 89 USD delivered to Finland.

    Next summer it's going to be some serious bikepacking-time!! I'm also planning to craft DIY framebag and seatbag for my Salsa Spearfish.

    Any thoughts on DIY-tarps?? DDHammock has some, but 48 euros / 64 USD for a tarp seems quite expensive for me..
    I've never heard of anything negative on DD hammocks. If you'd like to do a little reading on DD's give this link a look.
    Does this hammock have a bug net? Do you need one for where you ride?

    DD Hammocks - Hammock Forums - Elevate Your Perspective
    Last edited by SingleTrackLovr; 12-21-2012 at 09:24 AM.

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  43. #93
    gran jefe
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleTrackLovr View Post
    More to your question. I believe the hammocks I have are cut to a rectangle 11'x60" and a channel is sewn in the ends for the rope (whoopie) to tree straps.

    Does your cutting of the corners help with a flatter lay when lying diagonal?
    Hmm, okay. I have never made one without shortening the sides, so I can't really comment on the flatness question. I lie right down the middle, as far as I know. Shortening the sides might make anything else impossible.

  44. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by verslowrdr View Post
    $64 for a lightweight tarp is CHEAP! The least expensive silnylon I've been able to find was on Campmor, and I'd want at least 10' longways.

    Someone warned me about silnylon absorbing water though so I've held off on going that route. For right now I'm just trying a chunk of tyvek I bought off ebay... if I really get into this I might break down and get a cuben fiber tarp next year, but it's a hella chunk of change.
    Tyvek sounds like a great way to go. Light weight and inexpensive.
    The only down side I could see is if it would hold up in heavy winds.
    If you selected your camp site for the best wind protection your tyvek should last for many years.

    I have 4 sylnylon hammock tarps different sized depending on the time of year and a cuben.
    After owning a cuben for 2 seasons I am no longer a fan of this wonder material.
    It's negatives out weigh it light weighness (hope that's a word)

    If weight is not too much of an issue the best deal I've found is a Kelty Noah's Tarp 9'x9' hung diamond shaped. This gives you 12' under the hammock.

    Syl nylon tarps do adsorb a small amount of water if it's really raining.
    You get an effect called misting under it. Where hard rain hitting a soaked tarp
    causes some mist to form under the tarp. It's very minimal and has not been a issue for me and I've been in some real downpours.


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  45. #95
    gran jefe
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    And buy your wife a machine with metal gears!!

  46. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    Hmm, okay. I have never made one without shortening the sides, so I can't really comment on the flatness question. I lie right down the middle, as far as I know. Shortening the sides might make anything else impossible.
    Hi Bill,
    In the hammocking world that is called laying banana style.
    Next time you are in your hammock try laying feet left or right about 18"s and head about 18" opposite your feet. (feet right head left)
    You body should flatten out quite a bit and reduce the hyper extension of the knees.

    In my 11' hammocks I can lay almost flat when I lay a little asym.
    This also allows me to sleep on my side as well.
    If I want to lay on my left side my feet go right of center line and head goes left.

    Give it a try I'd love to hear if that works for you.

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  47. #97
    gran jefe
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleTrackLovr View Post
    Syl nylon tarps do adsorb a small amount of water if it's really raining.
    You get an effect called misting under it. Where hard rain hitting a soaked tarp
    causes some mist to form under the tarp. It's very minimal and has not been a issue for me and I've been in some real downpours.
    Sometimes they go a little thin with the "sil" part of the silnylon. you can fix it by repainting it with a thin coat of caulk/spirits. of course that makes it weigh more...

    tyvek seems risky. all those stitch holes look too much like perforations to me.

  48. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleTrackLovr View Post
    I've never heard of anything negative on DD hammocks. If you'd like to do a little reading on DD's give this link a look.
    Does this hammock have a bug net? Do you need one for where you ride?

    DD Hammocks - Hammock Forums - Elevate Your Perspective
    Thanks for the tip. I live and ride in Finland, so I definitely need a bug net. Mosquitos here can be a real pain in the ass. Last summer was hideous.

  49. #99
    gran jefe
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleTrackLovr View Post
    Hi Bill,
    In the hammocking world that is called laying banana style.
    Next time you are in your hammock try laying feet left or right about 18"s and head about 18" opposite your feet. (feet right head left)
    You body should flatten out quite a bit and reduce the hyper extension of the knees.

    In my 11' hammocks I can lay almost flat when I lay a little asym.
    This also allows me to sleep on my side as well.
    If I want to lay on my left side my feet go right of center line and head goes left.

    Give it a try I'd love to hear if that works for you.
    This isn't even possible in mine. I bend my knees and lay over to the side and it works great. I need to try a hammock like yours sometime.

  50. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    This isn't even possible in mine. I bend my knees and lay over to the side and it works great. I need to try a hammock like yours sometime.
    If you have a 11'x60" piece of 1.5-1.9 ripstop nylon laying around you can sew one up pretty fast. My latest hammock was made from 1.8 tafata or if your ever in the Denver area and can spend a nite in the woods I'd be glad to show you around. The Colorado Trail seg 1-3 are great places to bikepack.
    I have 3 complete hammock kits with tarps and under quilts. You'd just need to bring a sleeping bag for the season.

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