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  1. #51
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    Honestly if you think I have a negative tone, well sorry, but thats not my intent. When you ask for advise on buying on a budget, I dont expect to see "just buy the most expensive seat bag on the market" as sound advise IMO, considering it would be roughly $150 for a seat bag out of a soft budget of $200(and when we talk budgets, we dont have to always spend that full amount) whether or not it really is the best or not. If there is a more expensive seat bag out there, I'd like to know, I havn't seen any.

    And its nothing personal but the whole "you get what you pay for" mantra that is parroted, especially on this site, annoys the living hell out of me. If you have experience and sound reasoning for why something is not as good, then give that reason. Giving the above mantra for your reasoning is nothing but sales talk.

    Its like if someone were to ask (and this happens a ton on here) I have a budget of X. People always chime in to say well, thats not that good, you should spend X + Y.

    People crap on Bikesdirect, Airborne, etc, because the prices aren't as high so "something must be wrong or inferior" I find that attitude elitest, and I would consider myself the anti-elitest.

    And there is tons of good info on this thread, so hopefully the tread doesnt die out.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by steveohio View Post
    Honestly if you think I have a negative tone, well sorry, but thats not my intent. When you ask for advise on buying on a budget, I dont expect to see "just buy the most expensive seat bag on the market" as sound advise IMO, considering it would be roughly $150 for a seat bag out of a soft budget of $200(and when we talk budgets, we dont have to always spend that full amount) whether or not it really is the best or not. If there is a more expensive seat bag out there, I'd like to know, I havn't seen any.

    And its nothing personal but the whole "you get what you pay for" mantra that is parroted, especially on this site, annoys the living hell out of me. If you have experience and sound reasoning for why something is not as good, then give that reason. Giving the above mantra for your reasoning is nothing but sales talk.

    Its like if someone were to ask (and this happens a ton on here) I have a budget of X. People always chime in to say well, thats not that good, you should spend X + Y.

    People crap on Bikesdirect, Airborne, etc, because the prices aren't as high so "something must be wrong or inferior" I find that attitude elitest, and I would consider myself the anti-elitest.

    And there is tons of good info on this thread, so hopefully the tread doesnt die out.
    Your tone certainly came across negative, which is why people jumped on it. That was his advice, you don't have to take it if you don't want. And by the way, the Revelate seatbag is actually more affordable than many other options. After a very quick search:

    Revelate Viscacha: $130
    Revelate Terrapin: $90 (+ cheap drybag)
    Jpaks seatbag: $140
    Porcelain Rocket: $165
    Cleaveland Mountaineering: $100
    Nuclear Sunrise: $155
    Lone Mountain Innovations: $125

    So the Revelate bag is actually one of the cheaper options. Not to mention, it is sold at a whole bunch of online retailers and can be gotten on sale. A quick Ebay search shows you can get one for $126.50 delivered for a new one. That leaves you $73.50 for whatever else you need.

    I think it was pretty good advice!

  3. #53
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    Steve you are not just wrong you refuse to even listen. The bag is not 150, it holds a ton of gear (like others said your best bang for the buck) and lasts for years.

    https://www.revelatedesigns.com/inde...Seat-Bags/Pika
    https://www.revelatedesigns.com/inde...-Bags/Viscacha

    Here are 2 great bags. One above Revelates prices and one below:

    SEAT-BAGS
    Stock Products | Nuclear Sunrise Stitchworks

    Revelate is not the most expensive seatbag. It is the best selling one for a bunch of reasons. Longest production run, most refinements, a proven track record, resell value etc.

    You could have a cool kit for 200 or less. But no you keep disagreeing when you have no factual basis to disagree from.

    I have the experience. I broke it down for you. The reasoning is sound and I can add more and more but that would be redundant. You get what you pay for in a seatbag or frame bag or whatever bike bag. Ask anyone who has made one or owned one.

    This is not about Bikesdirect, but since you went there, someone finished the AZT750 on a Motobecane Ti 29er in 9 days. Most of us understand the value of that bike.

    edit- Oh and Airborne? Well Scott Morris set the original AZT750 record on the original Airborne Ti 29er in like 2005. So really irrelevant the idea that bike bags and value relates to bikes. All bikepackers know about how the bike means nothing.
    Scott Morris could have broke the AZT300 record in 2012 on a Mongoose. His Lenz gave him no advantage. His superlight custom cuben fiber seatbag did though. And his whole superlight kit.

    How about this for you? I beat a guy in the 2013 CTR who had a 22 lb 2013 sworks epic 29er. On a 28lb Voodoo Canzo. It aint about the bike.

    Multiple people have tried to tell you this in this thread (Teton 29er is one) but you just keep your mantra up.

  4. #54
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    I am going to bring this thread back to cheap options for bikepacking stuff. I was looking for a way to carry a water bladder on my trail bike (that only has one set of water bottle bosses) and came across a cheaper option. The obvious choice is a Revelate Tangle bag for around $70, but I figured there must be something else out there. I finally came across a product called the Sunlite Epic Tour Frame bag. Similar design to the Tangle with 2 compartments and 2 zippers, and 2 sizes available. I found one on Ebay for $24.97 shipped and jumped on it. Should be here in a couple of days, and I will post up my initial thoughts when I get it. I have no doubt the quality will not be up to Revelate standards, but for this experiment it should be great.

  5. #55
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    I'm also a fan of the practical advice on this thread. I've done a fair amount of touring that involved camping, but not bikepacking. I live in an area where there are not ample opportunities to do a long offroad tour, but i have a few shorter trips in mind for this spring and summer. as such, i am really looking for gear that i can either transfer over to my rack & pannier system or use for backpacking also. So far, i'm planning on getting the alps mountaineering stuff sack eatdrinkride used for a handlebar bag. for a frame pack, i'm going to go with the jandd large frame pack here:
    Frame Pack Large

    not sure what i'm going to do for a seat bag yet, though.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teton29er View Post
    Negative rep for the OP attitude. People didn't take time to give you advice to piss you off and argue. No one has suggested spending more than the 200 you said you had.

    Sounds like you know it all already, and you need to get out on your bike.
    I dunno, I tend to agree with him... apart from the negative tone. It's sorta like saying you can't drive to LA form SF unless you have a new car, because if you drive your old car, it will break down and you'll be stranded and eaten by buzzards. I just remember laughing in the face of a bike shop rat for telling me with a straight face that I need to spend at least $1000 on a hardtail, because I weigh 200 pounds and I'll break anything else the minute I take it on a trail. I rode for a year on a $375 bike (back in 2000), and was stoked to get out there. I think there is a lot of fear/uncertainty/doubt that revolves around bike stuff... and let's face it, anything where you plunk down your dollars. That's not to say that you don't get more when you pay more. I'm just saying that in many cases, low rent stuff is good enough.

    I gotta say, as long as the cheap bags hold up for a few rides without tearing (and that should be a really low bar) it can hold your stuff. Waterproof? Meh... stick your gear in Ziplock bags if you're so concerned about them getting wet. If it rattles around in a bag because it doesn't have divider compartments, stuff some newspaper or bubble wrap in there to take up some of the slack.

    Yeah, the high end stuff is swank, but IMO seriously overkill for somebody experimenting with a weekend new form of recreation. Even the really low rent bags will hold up just fine for at least a few outings. Just keep an eye on them to look for signs of straps coming loose, zippers failing, etc.

    Brains are more effective than dollars.

  7. #57
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    Haven't read all of the posts, and this may have already been said. But im about to go on my first bike-packing trip and i spent a little less than $150 and it should hold everything i need. Rear rack for $40, strapped a sea to summit dry bag to it $30, lone peak small frame bag $35 (for bike tool, pump, spare tubes, light, maps etc..) and then bought some titan straps (that haven't come in yet) $30 to strap my sleeping bag to the bars and the dry bag to the rack. The rest i will carry in a backpack.... Maybe not every one's cup of tea.. but it's cheap and effective.

  8. #58
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    I cant speak to cheap options for carrying stuff on the bike but as far as gear goes I've found a few options that are both moderately priced (considering other options on the market) and fully functional. They are as follows.
    Sleep system:
    Adventure Medical SOL Escape Bivvy. ($50) I've used one of these with a thermolite reactor bag liner down to 45* no problem. Unlike most bivvys it actually works as advertised and will allow moisture to escape. I would not recommend it for more than a few nights but for light and fast trips this combined with a tarp makes a fine solution for all but the harshest of environments. 8oz
    SOL sport utility blanket. ($16) possibly one of the best value multi use pieces out there. 11oz and 5'x7' so enough space (barely) to hunker down under in a bivvy. I would advise the use of a ground cloth also. It can be something as simple as painters plastic but make sure you have a way to keep the corners down.
    550 cord to keep the tarp ^ in place.($6)
    Thermolite Reactor bag liner. ($50). by wearing my clothes and having the bivvy I can keep comfortable down to around 45-50* below that a sleeping bag is required. 8oz
    Mammut Alpine mat UL. ($60) a bit spartan and certainly not for those after a bit of comfort (for that I would recommend something self inflating or a Therm-A-Rest Z Lite) but again for fast and light trips for those able to sleep on firm ground it is one of the best choices out there. Just 4oz for a full length pad unbelievably light and compact.
    Sea To Summit headnet with InsectShield ($12) I hate bugs. 1oz
    Sea To Summit light weight dry bag 20l keeps it all together ($15) 1oz

    I sometimes carry the NEMO GOGO Elite (1.8lbs $429) instead of the bivvy and Blanket combo, weather and bug dependent, also a Therm-A-Rest NeoAir X-lite($180 12 oz) sometimes replaces the Mammut mat but they are not budget friendly options.

    Lighting:
    Best budget option I've found is the Petzl e-lite ($25ish) a solid 25 lumens is enough to cook or read a book. Super light 1oz

    I know guys that make do with a Princeton Tec Photon 6gms $8 but I like something a bit more substantial. I have a strange affinity for flashlights though and I usually use a SureFire Sain Minimus while bikepacking. But it doesn't exactly fit the description of cheap ($150)

    Fire:
    UCO Survival match kit ($4) waterproof container with 15 high quality storm proof matches. boom.
    Light My Fire Scout fire steel ($10-15) don't be fooled by the scout 2.0 get the og one its lighter and doesn't have the silly built on plastics and useless whistle.
    Mini Bic ($1) speaks for itself

    Water Filtration:
    Sawyer Mini Filter. (around$20) At 2oz its silly to carry anything else simple to service in the field and water tastes good on the other end (unlike tablets) for moving sources that are relatively clean and clear its head and shoulders above the competition for simplicity and price.
    Katadyn Micro PUR tablets.($15 for 12 tablets) >1oz they're expensive, require a long time to dwell and don't do so hot in cold temps. But if water quality is a concern or simply for backup they are a good choice

    Cooking:
    Coke can alcohol stove ($.99) works great blossoms right up, boils enough water for tea coffee or a mountain house meal on about .5oz of fuel. They can be finicky at low temperatures and winds are an issue though.
    Snow Peak titanium Mug 600 with Four Dogs Stove titanium lid yea you can go cheaper but titanium is sexy. ($65)
    Snow Peak titanium spork ($9) again its pricy but I have a thing for Snow Peak

    Sometimes I take a Snow Peak canister stove if I am worried about weather or want to actually cook something. I use the Lite Max model at 1.9oz

    First Aid kit:
    Adventure Medical Kits Ultralight and Watertight .5 with some added bits, superglue gorilla tape some meds. Basically its a bunch of band-aids in a waterproof pouch but with a few additions its all I need.

    Bike Stuff:
    Lezyne Sport Drive ($20) works great, flex hose means its a bit more valve stem friendly. Can inflate a large volume 29 tire without too much faff.
    Park MT-1 multitool ($11) simple, no moving parts, fixes most things but is limited, on longer rides I carry the Ratchet Rocket by Topeak ($25) instead.
    Genuine innovations NanoFlate CO2 inflator with 2 16gm cartridges (15-20$) who likes filling tires with mini pumps?
    Zip ties ($? theyre cheap)
    Patch kit, mini bottle of stans, tube, patch kit, Pedros Tire Lever, Sram 10SPD powerlink, spare der hanger, Swiss Army Classic knife, and Park Spoke wrench usually compliment the above. These along with the paracord a few bits of scrap nylon and of course more gorilla tape have gotten me out of most trail side disasters.

    Aside from those items you don't really need much aside from a decent knife (if the classic won't cut it i.e. bushcraft) and a few other odds and sods, (provided you are somewhat clever and not a diva) to rough it a few nights in the woods. Beyond that its nice to have a tent and some other niceites to keep you from yearning for civilization.

    -edit- TLDR clifs notes, you can get out there with solid gear for around $400+ the cost of your preferred method of hauling crap around; be it harness and frame bags or if your on a real tight budget making it happen with just a pack.

  9. #59
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    FYI: Revelate has some specials on their blog. Revelate Designs LLC

  10. #60
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    This is very useful information shared here. I am really thankful for this.

  11. #61
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    Everything you see here, including the bike, was right around $700us and I am heading into my third year with all the original equipment. Everything, tent, sleeping bag, mini stove, two bags, fuel, water pills, etc came from amazon.

    My thread is here.

    My 600HT Journey
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bikepacking on a budget - Options besides DIY ?-2.jpg  

    Bikepacking on a budget - Options besides DIY ?-1.jpg  

    Bikepacking on a budget - Options besides DIY ?-3.jpg  

    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

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