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Thread: bike stem bags

  1. #1
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    bike stem bags

    I was looking to get such bag, but I am wondering do people have some knee clearance issues?

    Bikepacking Stem Bags - BIKEPACKING.com

    Today when I was doing stand up pedaling on steep terrain I noticed my knees get quite close to the steering wheel so I am not sure if this would work.

  2. #2
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    I have a Revelate Gas Tank and kinda hate it. Always rubbing my knees on it or semi-landing on it when I come to a stop. It's a great use of the space and I still use it when BPing because I need the room, but I use my Jerry Can or Feedbag when I just need a way to carry some extra junk on a longer ride.

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    I have two Revelate Design Mountain feedbag bags on my Salsa Mukluk and have no clearance issues. Mind you I don't tend to stand up often but when I have it has not been an issue.


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    Maybe if you used a handlebar instead of a steering wheel
    I used a Randijo bartender most of the summer on my Anthem and didn't hit my knee once despite lots of standing.

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    I was looking my knees on the road bike and when you pedal standing on the big uphill, it seems to me that is rather normal for knees to come close the the steering wheel, at least as you bend over the front of the bike. I am tall though if this makes a difference.

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    I used dual feed bags on a bike with shortish reach and never had any issues with hitting my knees on the bags. That includes punchy techy climbs where you are really lunging and standing up to hammer.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  7. #7
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    It seems you have real concerns even though every post points otherwise. See if you can try one out a shop or borrow one from a friend.

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    There's definitely potential for knee rubbing on some folks with some frames. It's a highly personal thing, but also depends on the bike. On my road bike when I stand up to pedal I get real close to the handlebars, and stem bags would drive me nuts - but on all of my other bikes I have pretty good clearance.
    Nick Smolinske - Owner/Operator at Rogue Panda Designs
    www.roguepanda.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by NickSmolinske View Post
    There's definitely potential for knee rubbing on some folks with some frames. It's a highly personal thing, but also depends on the bike. On my road bike when I stand up to pedal I get real close to the handlebars, and stem bags would drive me nuts - but on all of my other bikes I have pretty good clearance.
    Thats exactly my problem, because I was planning to put them on my road (adventure) bike.

  10. #10
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    I can't use feedbags like that, at all, because I hit my knees on them so often. Especially when standing, but sometimes just with heavy body english even when seated.

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    people like to move forward when standing on the pedals. That is a poor technique.
    What is a good technique?
    Some portion of your butt should be above the saddle at all times. Why? Mechanical failure. Ever broken a chain, pedal, something? Modern equipment is reliable. Not perfect. If the crank arm sinks to the bottom all of a sudden, and your butt is above the top tube, you may very well hit the ground. If the chain breaks, and some part of your butt is above the seat, you say ouch, and stay up right. I wonder, if a ghost shift on the cassette is enough to take all tension off the chain, and cause the pedal to drop to the bottom of the rotation, throwing you off balance and to the ground.}}


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKnYbaQddBE

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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisx View Post
    people like to move forward when standing on the pedals. That is a poor technique.
    What is a good technique?
    Some portion of your butt should be above the saddle at all times. Why? Mechanical failure. Ever broken a chain, pedal, something? Modern equipment is reliable. Not perfect. If the crank arm sinks to the bottom all of a sudden, and your butt is above the top tube, you may very well hit the ground. If the chain breaks, and some part of your butt is above the seat, you say ouch, and stay up right. I wonder, if a ghost shift on the cassette is enough to take all tension off the chain, and cause the pedal to drop to the bottom of the rotation, throwing you off balance and to the ground.}}
    so what you are saying if I have a bottle of wine in each feedbag and I crash, the bottles would be broken?

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    Quote Originally Posted by toni31 View Post
    so what you are saying if I have a bottle of wine in each feedbag and I crash, the bottles would be broken?
    Yes, but the key is that they'd break only if your weight was too far forward. Keeping your weight back on a steep ST section, the bike would be likely to loop backward, giving you time to initiate a reverse somersault off the bike, simultaneously grabbing both bottles as they arc, spinning, backward through the air. Timed just right, you could have the corks pulled and the wine aerated and poured before you stick the landing. Moustache wax required, of course.

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    I have used mine a lot. I have a hydro flask that sits in it perfectly. Great for hot tea, which I do drink a lot in the winter and fall.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim208 View Post
    I have used mine a lot. I have a hydro flask that sits in it perfectly. Great for hot tea, which I do drink a lot in the winter and fall.
    you fall after you drink hot tea in winter?

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim208 View Post
    I have used mine a lot. I have a hydro flask that sits in it perfectly. Great for hot tea, which I do drink a lot in the winter and fall.
    Add some bourbon and that is my drink of choice in the cold. Sometimes after too much bourbon I fall.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by toni31 View Post
    you fall after you drink hot tea in winter?
    I seem to fall year round!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisx View Post
    people like to move forward when standing on the pedals. That is a poor technique.
    What is a good technique?
    Some portion of your butt should be above the saddle at all times. Why? Mechanical failure. Ever broken a chain, pedal, something? Modern equipment is reliable. Not perfect. If the crank arm sinks to the bottom all of a sudden, and your butt is above the top tube, you may very well hit the ground. If the chain breaks, and some part of your butt is above the seat, you say ouch, and stay up right. I wonder, if a ghost shift on the cassette is enough to take all tension off the chain, and cause the pedal to drop to the bottom of the rotation, throwing you off balance and to the ground.}}


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKnYbaQddBE
    What kind of engineer are you?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by toni31 View Post
    I was looking to get such bag, but I am wondering do people have some knee clearance issues?

    Bikepacking Stem Bags - BIKEPACKING.com

    Today when I was doing stand up pedaling on steep terrain I noticed my knees get quite close to the steering wheel so I am not sure if this would work.
    I have the bedrock tapeats and revelate mountain feed bags on my cockpit. I also have very short stem and I never hit my knees on the bags. I sit when climbing also.
    ptarmigan hardcore

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