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  1. #1
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    Backcountry Toolkit Advice *REVISED*

    Okay, so I'll be running the GDMBR next June. I'll be bikepacking it - not racing it. As I prep for it, and as my ECR gets more and more fine-tuned, I am beginning to focus on what to take with me. I've got UL tent/sleeping bag/pad, and I won't be bringing a stove. I'll be running Chupacabras, tubeless.

    What do you guys take with you for tools? Here's what I was thinking about:

    1. Park Tool I-Beam Mini w/chain tool

    2. Leatherman Wave

    3. Tire Plugs with insertion tool

    4. Braided fishing line, and curved needle (x2)

    5. Park Tool tire boot (x2)

    6. Super Glue

    7. Spare spokes.

    8. I use Orange Seal, so a small bottle of that.

    8. Zip Ties

    9. Four (4) chain links and a quick-link

    10. Some Gorilla Tape

    11. Spare tube with some Orange Seal in it.

    12. Spare shift cable.

    Let me know what you guys think. Too much? Too heavy?
    Last edited by VeloMax; 2 Weeks Ago at 02:10 PM.

  2. #2
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    Got a spoke tool for the spokes? Tire plug. At least 1 tube? Pump plus some stans. I like some black heavy carpet thread for tire repairs. Leatherman for the pliers?

  3. #3
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    The wheels were made by MikeC, so I know they are nearly bombproof, and I'm not an aggressive rider. I'm not using Stan's - its that orange stuff - forgot the name. The Park I-Beam tool has a spoke wrench with it. I have carpet thread also, but being a fisherman, I also have tons of leftover spools of kevlar line.

    My pump is a Lezyne Micro Floor Drive HV.

  4. #4
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    My list was:
    Needle/Floss
    2 Tubes and boot
    1 Spare Brake Pad set
    Multi tool with chain brake/spoke wrench
    short section of spare chain and quick links
    spare cleat and bolts
    spare derailleur hanger
    spare spokes (check for different sizes front to rear and side to side)
    tire levers
    tube patch kit
    zip ties
    small bottle of Stans
    spare derailleur cable
    small pump

    BTW - a good portion of that fit into a small peanut butter jar and then went into my frame bag. Two tubes in bag at the bottom, then this jar and first aid kit just above that. Hoped to never have to access any of those items (never did).

  5. #5
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    ZIP TIES! Thank you.

    Question: Are those emergency spoke kits any good?

  6. #6
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    Pretty sure you ended up with DT hubs, yes?

    If so, there's no need for the cassette removal tool. If you break a spoke and need to remove the cassette to replace it, just pull the whole freehub body off the axle, with the cassette still installed, replace the spoke, then slip the cassette/freehub back on. Takes less time to do it this way than to find the cassette tool in your kit.

    Wrap some duct tape, maybe even Tyvek tape, around a few things in your kit. Most people put it on their pump shaft, others put it on the seatpost. As long as it's handy and still effective when you need it, anywhere is fine.

    Tire plugs for sure -- differing sizes mandatory.

    Spare shift cable in case yours gets fouled somehow. Ability to install and fine tune it is important.

    Looking forward to hear what others have to contribute.

  7. #7
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    Agree on the generous tire repair kit. Sidewall cuttings from an old tire can make good external or internal tire patches (with superglue; tube patches stretch too much for big jobs). Some Gorilla Tape to complete your seamstress kit. Other than that and the good advice here, sounds good.

    Props to the touring pace – setting up for a grand time.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post
    Agree on the generous tire repair kit. Sidewall cuttings from an old tire can make good external or internal tire patches (with superglue; tube patches stretch too much for big jobs). Some Gorilla Tape to complete your seamstress kit. Other than that and the good advice here, sounds good.

    Props to the touring pace – setting up for a grand time.
    Thanks! I turn 60 on the day that I set off down the trail in Banff. Nobody understands why I want to do it - only you guys.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Pretty sure you ended up with DT hubs, yes?

    If so, there's no need for the cassette removal tool. If you break a spoke and need to remove the cassette to replace it, just pull the whole freehub body off the axle, with the cassette still installed, replace the spoke, then slip the cassette/freehub back on. Takes less time to do it this way than to find the cassette tool in your kit.
    Thanks again, for all your good advice, Mike. I'm happy that you steered me to the DT hubs. They are sound!

  10. #10
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    Aside from things already mentioned, I'd also carry:

    * a small bottle of tubeless juice of your choice

    * Quick-link/spare links
    “I dream of a day when my children will live in a world without the shackles of cause and effect.” - S. Colbert


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smithhammer View Post
    Aside from things already mentioned, I'd also carry:

    * a small bottle of tubeless juice of your choice

    * Quick-link/spare links
    Do you mean quick links -and- spare links? How many?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by VeloMax View Post
    Do you mean quick links -and- spare links? How many?
    A quick-link and/or a couple spare links is prolly fine.
    “I dream of a day when my children will live in a world without the shackles of cause and effect.” - S. Colbert


  13. #13
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    Most of the stuff have been covered above, so I won't rehash all of it. I did want to address your question concerning spokes and the fiber-fix emergency spoke replacement thingy. I have one any carry it in my kit, but have never used it. Seems like it should work to get you out of the woods safely. My rides are nowhere near as long as what you are planning though. I have some wheels built by Mike too and try to remember to ask him the spoke lengths he used on the wheels. Depending on the choice of hubs and rims, you could only need 1 or 2 sizes of spokes, and if you have a good place to put them, like a frame bag, it may be worth taking a couple. And yes, Mikes wheels are good stuff, but you never know what can happen out there!

    And yeah, zip ties and duct tape! A couple random screws for water bottles cages, etc. is a good idea.

    Also, I saw it mentioned once, but I'll second bringing and extra cleat and screws if you are using clipless pedals.

  14. #14
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    Forgot that I also had a small pair of visegrips - maybe 3" long. Good for cutting cable and zip ties. Good for pulling thorns (not great but works with patience). Can be used on stubborn bolts, etc.

    Not repair kit related, but I had room in the peanut butter jar, so I threw 2 pieces of firestarter in the jar. Not sure of the brand, but the size of a peppermint hard candy and they work really well. Good for the emergency kit.

  15. #15
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    The thing to keep in mind with many brands of super glue is that it is brittle when dry and will break almost immediately. If you are hoping to use it on anything that flexes while in use you need to find something that is flexible when dry such as seam grip or even a premixed flexible epoxy.

    normal super glue has very limited uses in the backcountry I find.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by alias View Post
    The thing to keep in mind with many brands of super glue is that it is brittle when dry and will break almost immediately. If you are hoping to use it on anything that flexes while in use you need to find something that is flexible when dry such as seam grip or even a premixed flexible epoxy.

    normal super glue has very limited uses in the backcountry I find.
    I love and use SeamGrip as much as anyone, but it requires 24 hours to cure, as do most (all?) products that dry flexible. The advantage of superglue is that it works immediately and reasonably well as a stopgap, and it works through tire sealant so not necessary to prep with isopropyl. I've carried a small bottle with the cap taped on, and also the tinier squeeze tubes; have fixed all manner of tire carnage, including a sidewall slice I could stick my index finger through (though that one did require a tube).

    I've fixed too many punctures, both on my bike and others', in the field to think about taking superglue out of my kit. Same with tire plugs. Both super light, fast, compact repair solutions that will get you to a permanent fix with minimal wrenching.

  17. #17
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    When you guys speak of "tire plugs," are you speaking of the bicycle kind, or the simple run-of-the-mill automotive kind?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by VeloMax View Post
    When you guys speak of "tire plugs," are you speaking of the bicycle kind, or the simple run-of-the-mill automotive kind?
    Either works. You don't have to buy bike specific.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigolclyde View Post
    Either works. You don't have to buy bike specific.
    Ah thanks! Good to know. I suppose I'll have to tote along the plug insertion tool as well... unless there's a more-lightweight solution...

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by VeloMax View Post
    Ah thanks! Good to know. I suppose I'll have to tote along the plug insertion tool as well... unless there's a more-lightweight solution...
    Not sure you will get this kit in the states, but I have this one...

    https://www.evanscycles.com/weldtite...h-kit-00103371

    and also carry the plugs from this in case of a smaller hole....

    https://www.genuineinnovations.com/u...repair-kit.php

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by alias View Post
    The thing to keep in mind with many brands of super glue is that it is brittle when dry and will break almost immediately.....
    Super Glue Power Flex

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flying_Scotsman View Post
    Have you actually tried this, Flying Scotty? I looked on their site and could not find a cure time for this. I probably didnt look hard enough, but was wondering if you have first-hand experience with it?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by VeloMax View Post
    Have you actually tried this, Flying Scotty? I looked on their site and could not find a cure time for this. I probably didnt look hard enough, but was wondering if you have first-hand experience with it?
    Luckily or unfortunately I have not had to try it yet, but an acquaintance affected a repair to a tear in a tyre with this and the G.I. anchovies.... not sure how long he had to sit and wait on it curing; cant imagine it being as quick as the normal stuff, but it cant be that long either.

  24. #24
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    The leatherman signal with replaceable hard wire cutter blades works pretty well for cutting derailleur cables, also has a fire starter, saw, and hammer. Tried the lighter freestyle, but it struggled to cut derailleur cables. Going to add the signal to my regular riding downtube bag kit as the 9point8 fall line dropper remote likes to chew through derailleur cables at the most inconvenient times.

  25. #25
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    Depending on your handle bar setup you could store spokes in there.

    Cotton ball soaked in Vaseline will light quite nicely with a lighter.
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  26. #26
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    I suggest adding a bit of "bailing wire" (useful for holding things together if something breaks), some chain oil (you are probably bringing it - it isn't really a repair kit item, just thought I would mention it), and some spare nuts and bolts ( in sizes matching what you have on the bike, especially rack bolts if you are using a rack).

    If your ECR has surly's newer style replaceable dropouts/hangers, I would add the drive side to your kit with the hanger on it. h

    Mostly I wouldn't worry too much about it - stuff will break, just be flexible and if/when things go wrong make it work.

    Have a great adventure!

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