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  1. #1
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    What should I buy?

    Hi everyone!
    =========
    I wanna buy a full suspension bike that is versatile and can be used as a do-it-all-bike (long distance XC rides, singletracks and technical trail/AM).

    In addition, since I'm not a competitive or professional rider, I'm not looking for any high-end bike, just a bike I can ride right out-of-the-box, without any upgrades.

    After searching and checking I narrowed my choice to two bikes: 26" TREK REMEDY 7 and 29" TREK RUMBLEFISH. both bikes are entry level bikes in their line up, and both of them have good reviews. I tested these two (17.5" size) and really liked them both, so I have a real dilemma.

    What's your advise? 26" or 29"? REMEDY 7 or RUMBLEFISH? Which is more versatile? Which is easier to ride? Please advise me regarding those two particular bikes and please please don't suggest any other bikes so I won't have a bigger dilemma.

    Thanks, Mo.
    Last edited by mo6500; 05-25-2011 at 02:49 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by mo6500 View Post
    Hi everyone!
    =========
    I wanna buy a full suspension bike that is versatile and can be used as a do-it-all-bike (long distance XC rides, singletracks and technical trail/AM).

    In addition, since I'm not a competitive or professional rider, I'm not looking for any high-end bike, just a bike I can ride right out-of-the-box, without any upgrades.

    After searching and checking I narrowed my choice to two bikes: 26" TREK REMEDY 7 and 29" TREK RUMBLEFISH. both bikes are entry level bikes in their line up, and both of them have good reviews. I tested these two (17.5" size) and really liked them both, so I have a real dilemma.

    What's your advise? 26" or 29"? REMEDY 7 or RUMBLEFISH? Which is more versatile? Which is easier to ride? Please advise me regarding those two particular bikes and please please don't suggest any other bikes so I won't have a bigger dilemma.

    Thanks, Mo.
    You tryin' to start a war or somethin' fella!

    Really though, it's all just a matter of whether you prefer 26" to 29" or vice versa. Folks 'round here have some very strong opinions about both. I don't!

    I say, go with your gut instinct. What feels best to you!

    PS.

    Having said that, the Rumblefish looks pretty damned nice, doesn't it?

    What should I buy?-12115.jpg

    The Rumblefish

    What should I buy?-11367.jpg

    The Remedy 7
    Last edited by MoabiSlim; 05-30-2011 at 11:25 PM.
    God gave birds, wings to fly .... He gave us, Jamis!

  3. #3
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    I get those that are staunch about their 26"s. My feeling is that if you can only have ONE car, it may as well be the SUV instead of the sedan.

    Same here- I told my LBS salesguy I would NOT be in the market for another bike for a LOOOONG time after forking out this kind of money. And I already have an old 26" Tassahara HT. He says if you can only have one, GET THE 29ER.

    I LOVE my '10 Rumblefish 1. As an intermediate rider, I can use all the help I can get crawling over larger obstacles that I could not do on my 26". Maybe it's mostly in my head, but I think it has made me a MUCH better biker!

    If you ask trek/GF, their supposedly narrower wheelbase for a 29er eliminates the suggested lack of ability to conquer slow, technical sections of trail.

    Good Luck!

  4. #4
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    29 inch wheels have limitations that 26 inch wheels do not. Obviously, there are benefits to 29 inch wheels just research what you are giving up. The main thing is that you wont have the same quick handling of a 26 inch wheeled bike and a 29 inch wheeled bike will most likely have more flex. A 29 inch wheeled bike should be capable of a higher "maintained" speed but will have slower acceleration. Wheels also act as gyros and resist changes in direction so going larger will slow down your steering as well. I am thinking of adding a 29er as my third bike but it would probably be a light ti HT and I would only ride it on smooth flowy trails... I am not sure how a 29er would work out as a trail bike where I live.

  5. #5
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    Yea, yea, that's textbook stuff! Got all that when I researched my purchase. Perhaps its my dulled sensory system from too much of who-knows-what, but I was pleasantly surprised when I couldn't tell the difference in the acceleration dept, but I certainly did in the "rollin over stuff" category.

    MO6500- go testride each for a day. It's YOUR decision on YOUR trails. Me riding on AZ rockgardens nor anyone else is gonna tell you what is best for you....Just like nobody is gonna tell you whether you should like chocolate milk over the white stuff.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by agomez View Post
    Just like nobody is gonna tell you whether you should like chocolate milk over the white stuff.
    Actually, I would tell you this.

    As for the two bikes in question, I would most likely go with the Rumblefish. I do like the earlier posters analogy of 'why buy a sedan when you could buy a suv". This both applies to my recent bike purchase, as well as my car purchase and I do have some regret with both purchases. I went with 26" (used) because of budget concerns but would've most likely went with 29" if things were different with money and if my family wasn't planning a vacation for this fall. If you could get away with testing them for the day, that would be ideal so you could see just how each bike handles at your local trail. I do think the benefits of the 29er can outweigh the negatives but it depends on where you ride. One of my local trails is very smooth, flowy singletrack which isn't common for this area and don't think the 29er would have much of a benefit here. However, the other trail that I ride can be quite technical and rocky and the benefits of the 29er would most likely be apparent. Good luck, they both seem like great bikes.

  7. #7
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    I'd like to pipe in and say that the two bikes are hardly comparable. The Remedy is an AM bike that's designed much burlier than the Rumblefish, which is more of a heavy-duty XC bike. For long XC rides the Remedy is going to be a pain; way too much travel for that. Decide what your priorities are and then think about it again.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by agomez View Post
    Yea, yea, that's textbook stuff! Got all that when I researched my purchase. Perhaps its my dulled sensory system from too much of who-knows-what, but I was pleasantly surprised when I couldn't tell the difference in the acceleration dept, but I certainly did in the "rollin over stuff" category.

    MO6500- go testride each for a day. It's YOUR decision on YOUR trails. Me riding on AZ rockgardens nor anyone else is gonna tell you what is best for you....Just like nobody is gonna tell you whether you should like chocolate milk over the white stuff.
    That's a good point... You will never know what will work best for you until you take them out on a demo ride.

    In the mean time, here is some more of that textbook stuff:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8H98BgRzpOM

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