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  1. #1
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    Suspension system advice

    Hello i have been riding hardtails since i started trail riding a couple of years back. My current bike is a specialized rockhopper, I haven 0 complaints about the bike however as i become more and more adventurous on my bike ive started riding trails which are both steep and very bumpy with lots of tree roots and rocks.

    I love my hardtail but im starting to feel sorry for it as it becomes increasingly creaky and squeeky. Also the ride isnt particually comfortable so im considering upgrading to a full suspension bike. My question isnt what rides the best as it comes down to the rider, my question is what suspension systems are the best for peddling on. I hear a lot of full sus bikes just eat up all of your peddle power leaving you nackered and gasping for air.

    So i would greatly appreciate it if anyone could point me in the direction of a light peddle friendly full sus bike for around 1k-2k. The bikes ive been looking at are the marin mount vision and the orange 5. Ive done some homework looking at reviews but all they really say is that they are good... which isnt really that helpful.

  2. #2
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    i think VPP handles that pretty well... not sure though

    i remember seeing a few reviews for the trek full floating suspensions, apparently they handle the peddle bob quite well, keeping it to a minimum.

    but i always seem to hear horror stories about trek frames liking to crack, i dunno why...

  3. #3
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    No longer any boing...

    [QUOTE=noodlea] I hear a lot of full sus bikes just eat up all of your peddle power leaving you nackered and gasping for air. QUOTE]

    That issue has been gone since the advent of platform shocks (i.e. 5th Element, Fox RP series) about 2001 or 2.

    Any FS bike will have little, or very little, pedal boing.

    Most suspensions are extremely similar; 4 bar (includes Horst Link, VPP & DW Link), single pivot (Yeti/Santa Cruz, and Faux Bar bikes like Kona).

    Choose the frame that suits you best for fit.

    Jim

  4. #4
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    I personally have owned these designs:
    FSR (horst link), Faux Bar Link, Multi-Link (Schwinn Rocket 88), DW-Link

    The DW-Link was my favorite as it simply floated through rock gardens, had very little pedal bob (seated), and remained active under braking. The Schwinn Rocket 88 has a similar multi-link design and acted similar (but not quite the same) as the DW-Link.

    If I were to get a FS bike again (I ride a 29er hardtail nowadays) the Multi-Link bikes (Maestro, VPP, Niner CVA, DW-Link) would be my first choice to look at.

  5. #5
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    dont buy into specialized marketing crap. theres nothing faux about a 4-bar bike.

    go test ride the marin and see if you like it, they're good bikes. underrated, but thats kind of a good thing, means theres good deals to be had!

  6. #6
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    disagree...

    the faux bar bike, having a fixed chainstay (BB to Rear Axle) doesn't work the same way as a 4 bar FSR, VPP, DW-Link, Marin whatchamacallit, and so on. It will work like any single pivot bike, regardless. It's just that simple, as the chainstay is fixed, with no pivot points.

    If you disagree, here's wikipedia for you to go to edit:

    Seat-stay four-link pivot bikes perform exactly like similarly placed monopivots under acceleration and chain forces, which means they aren't as neutral under acceleration as Horst-link, four-bar bikes, dw-link, or Split Pivot bikes. However, when brakes are mounted on the seat stays, dw-link, Split Pivot and FSR four-link bikes have an advantage while braking over rough ground.[4] One manufacturer well known for their long-time use of the seat-stay pivot four-bar link suspension is Kona, who incorporate the design on their entire line-up, along with other manufacturers such as Infiza and Icon.

    Poster's note: Kona has been with this simple single pivot design since 1996, according to their website.

    I wouldn't consider that Specialized shoots out any more mktg. "crap" than any other suspension bike company.

    Jim

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimC.
    the faux bar bike, having a fixed chainstay (BB to Rear Axle) doesn't work the same way as a 4 bar FSR, VPP, DW-Link, Marin whatchamacallit, and so on. It will work like any single pivot bike, regardless. It's just that simple, as the chainstay is fixed, with no pivot points.

    If you disagree, here's wikipedia for you to go to edit:

    Seat-stay four-link pivot bikes perform exactly like similarly placed monopivots under acceleration and chain forces, which means they aren't as neutral under acceleration as Horst-link, four-bar bikes, dw-link, or Split Pivot bikes. However, when brakes are mounted on the seat stays, dw-link, Split Pivot and FSR four-link bikes have an advantage while braking over rough ground.[4] One manufacturer well known for their long-time use of the seat-stay pivot four-bar link suspension is Kona, who incorporate the design on their entire line-up, along with other manufacturers such as Infiza and Icon.

    Poster's note: Kona has been with this simple single pivot design since 1996, according to their website.

    I wouldn't consider that Specialized shoots out any more mktg. "crap" than any other suspension bike company.

    Jim
    Exactly!

    I've owned a FSR and two Faux Bar Link bikes...TOTALLY different, especially under braking. If the Faux Bar Link design was as active as an FSR design...it wouldn't have a need for a floating brake system like Kona puts on their DH bikes.

  8. #8
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    Seat-stay pivot bikes are FAUX-BAR! They are totally inferior. Period. Don't buy the crap that you shouldn't consider marketing. Some companies just don't have much to offer so they do less marketing.

    And many bikes with a so-called virtual pivot are better than a horst-link. DW-Link, Maestro, VPP2, and others are just a better design. Period.

  9. #9
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    who said anything about performance? i didnt say it works like fsr, i said faux bar is a marketing term. 4 bar is an engineering term. it means a suspension has.... 4 bars. which single pivot wheel path bikes have.

    fsr isnt exactly the god of suspension anyway.. its bobby just like normal 4 bars. vpp, maestro and dw work a lot better.

    find me a car that has the pivots in specialized's patented location.. its a 4 bar, faux bar is a made up term.

  10. #10
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    I ride an old Santa Cruz Heckler, that climbs up hills extremely well. I believe that it is a single pivot, and I would suggest them to anyone!

  11. #11
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    Ive just got back from testing the 2009 Marin Mount Vision 5.8 and the Specialized FSR Expert Carbon stumpy. I had to use and unsuspecting mate to get the specialized as i didn't have the money in the bank for both. And his logic is i didn't pass my driving test to ride full stop.

    The Specialized was a wicked ride DH but ive got to say the brain did my head in its in a bit of an awkward position for adjustments and with it fully open it really does suck at climbing. Coming from a hard tail i really noticed it and was actually put off getting a full suspension bike. It was also a little above my price range at 2.3k reduced from 2.7

    The marin on the other hand was also a really fun ride, it was a bit heavy but i did seem to gel with it, there was minimal bob while climbing and i really enjoyed it. its probably not as good as the stumpy DH but tbh im not at the level where its going to make a difference i really enjoyed the Marin, so i ordered the 5.8 2009 model for 1800 reduced from 2.3k my mate gave me a thoroughly confused look as to why i would spend so much on a bike, called me a twat and we went home.

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