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  1. #1
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    Specialized Hardrock Sport or Trek 4300 or something else

    Trying to decide between a Specialized Hardrock Sport ($339) and a Trek 4300 ($359). I plan on riding both trails and paths and my budget is right around $350. Any other recommendations in this price range? Thanks in advance for you help

  2. #2
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
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    Nike or Addidas....

    both good shoes but you buy the ones that FIT! Check out the frame that fits you best and you like the look of most.

    Then: base your decision on the shop (do you trust them to fit you and help you fit the bike?) value (this is an entry level bike so not too important) and service (can you come back and get minor adjustments for free year 1?)

    Either bike will do you fine, just don't wander over into Wallyworld for some "gen-yew-ine aircraft aluminum" tank of a bike. Those are junk.


    Good luck, check your fit profile here : http://www.wrenchscience.com

    Jim

  3. #3
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    Alivio vs. Acera rear derailer - a factor?

    WIth that said, I still need to go ride the Specialized. BTW - I did notice the Trek has an Alivio rear derailer while the Specialized has an Acera. The Trek book says that the Acera is a lesser component. Does this make much difference in this range of bike?

    I do favor one bike shop over the other, so that will definitely be a factor in my decision.

  4. #4
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    well....

    either drive train will work, I'd favor the higher end one. But for beginners it's not a big deal, and the key is a good frame. Then when you wear out the drive train, you buy LX or better and stick that on the bike.

    but you're beginning, so don't over analyze, the key is to get a good fit and have fun, not buy the race model for $350, that's not going to happen.

    Using a poor shoe anlaogy....you're in the $29.99 running shoe range here, so
    1) stick to a brand name
    2) then work on fit, and
    3) then work on "running", ....soon you will find what your true needs and wants are.

    Maybe in a year or 2 you'll want to come back and check out the $199 shoe models, recognizing the lower models don't deliver for you?

    Both are good bikes, a good shop will help you from there.

    Good luck, Jim

  5. #5
    beer *****es n' bikes
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    The Hardrock Sport is quite heavy and overbuilt... the 4300 will probably serve you better since you won't need the dirtjump ruggedness of the Hardrock, and the extra 8lbs that come with it. For beginning trailriders we always point to the 4300 at the shop, vs. the Hardrock which we also sell.

    Whichever you get, enjoy it and ride the crap out of it!
    bike dude, velocity employee (this is my personal account)

  6. #6
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    Just bought the Trek 4500 and 4500 WSD

    With your guidance, I made the choice of the Trek 4500. Test rode both the Specializeds (HardRock/Rockhopper) and the Treks (4300 and 4500). They actually gave me the Trek for $400. My wife also got a 4500WSD. I hope this will do me well.

    Thanks again for all your help. Let me know your opinions of the 4500 and 4500 WSD.

  7. #7
    Ya, right.
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    Trek 4500 good choice

    You made an excellent choice by going with the Trek 4500. I have an '02 4500, and it has served me well. I bought mine as a beginner bike to see if I would like mountain biking, and I fell in love with trail riding--thanks to the positive experiences with my 4500. Now I am ready to switch to FS. The 4500 doesn't have the best specs/components of course, but dollar for dollar it is one of the best values out there.

    Many happy days in the saddle are sure to come for you both. Happy trails

  8. #8
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    I have a 2002 4300, and I'm quite happy with it. I think my next bike will be full suspension, but that'll be a while... the 4300 is very upgradeable (tho I need to figure out how to mount rear discs) and seems to be well made.

  9. #9
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    Since Trek and Specialized frames (for the bikes your looking at) are from Giant...your better off getting a Giant. Your componants will be a litte better quality. The same is true for Raleigh (K2, Haro, Diamondback).

    Take a look at the Giant Iguana or Rainier or the Raleigh M50 or M60...over all best value I think is the Raleigh M80, however that's closer to $550.

    Anyway, check out you bike shop(s), they have a lot to do with which bike you'll get. I tend to stay away from shops that 'trash' bikes they don't carry.

    good luck!

    "You might remember Raleigh if you owned bikes in the 1970s; the English brand was one of the best bike makers in the world. They fell on hard times for a while, but they're back in force now with an excellent line of bikes. One of our favorites is the 03' M80, which features an absolutely mind-boggling array of features and value-laden parts at a price that is honestly unfair to competitors. The aluminum frame features a rear disc brake mount, a rarity on low-end bikes, and a reinforcing gusset on the head/down tube juncture. It's a quality frame not often found on bikes this cheap. The parts are an overall success. There's a nine-speed Shimano Deore drivetrain, Tektro's inexpensive linear-pull rim brakes, and a Rock Shox Judy C fork. The only real miss is the wheels, which use no-name alloy hubs. Fortunately the Weinmann rims and WTB Velociraptor tires make up for the hubs, but hubs are the heart of a wheelset and these will likely be some of the first parts to go on this bike. That one glitch notwithstanding, the M80 is a real find."
    -MTB Rider mag (Consumer Report)
    Last edited by Akali; 02-26-2004 at 12:51 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akali
    Since Trek and Specialized frames (for the bikes your looking at) are from Giant...your better off getting a Giant.
    I'm pretty sure you're wrong about this, and I can't possibly see what bearing it has on the bike whatsoever in the event it is true. The Hardrock and Trek frames are COMPLETELY different.
    bike dude, velocity employee (this is my personal account)

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by seely
    I'm pretty sure you're wrong about this, and I can't possibly see what bearing it has on the bike whatsoever in the event it is true. The Hardrock and Trek frames are COMPLETELY different.
    Majority of bike companies buy or customize their frames from Taiwan/China. Giant being the largest producer of the 'cookie cutter' frames. Since they do custom frames (Specialized for example) they don't offer the same frame to others (Kona for example), However, your low end bikes tend to use similar if not the same frame...it's cheaper. Trek however does manufacture their high end frames. Just cuz the Specialized and Trek low end frames look nothing alike...those frames are coming out of the Giant factory none the less. The cost of manufacturing frames in the US is huge...it's cheaper to have the frames customized over seas...anyway, what'ever...I'm not wrong...I used to work for Raleigh way back in the day.

    1972, Establishes Giant Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
    1980, Becomes Taiwan's Largest Bicycle Manufacturer.
    1981, Establishes Giant Sales Company, Taiwan
    1986, Establishes Giant Europe BV, Netherlands.
    1987, Establishes Giant Bicycle INC., USA
    1989, Establishes Giant Company Ltd., Japan.
    1991, Establishes Giant Bicycle Co., Canada, Inc.
    1991, Establishes Giant Bicycles PTY Ltd., Australia
    1992, Establishes Giant (China) Co. Ltd.
    1994, Goes Public on Taiwan Stock Exchange
    1996, Establishes European Factory, Netherlands.
    1997, Establishes Chuansin Metal Products (Kunshan) Co. Ltd.
    1998, Manufactures 2,840,000 Bicycles in a single year.
    1998, Aquire 30% share of HODAKA in Japan.

    Here are links to some frames that might look well familiar...

    http://www.biketaiwan.com/New/Script...0&Cs_No=C04126

    http://www.biketaiwan.com/New/Script...1&Cs_No=C06330

    http://www.hodaka.com.tw/bikes/DOWN%20HILL/F-DH.html

    http://www.maxway.com.tw/cgi-bin/pro...lst.pl?CatID=1

    http://www.taroka.com.tw/cgi-bin/pro...st.pl?ProdID=3
    Last edited by Akali; 02-27-2004 at 08:24 AM.

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