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  1. #1
    Edison, NJ
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    Specialized Allez Double?

    How is this as a first road bike? Will it keep me satisfied when i decide to put upgrades on? Also, what is the difference between a double and triple?

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Mostly fine, but the shifters blow. Or at least, I hate that kind. If you rode the bike and the thumb button thingies didn't bother you, go for it - they're supposed to still have an okay service life.

    "Double" and "triple" refer to the number of chainrings. The smallest chain ring on the double has 39 teeth. The smallest on the triple has 30 teeth. It's a pretty significant difference. If you're already in good shape, the double will be okay. If you're trying to get in shape, you'd like to do some really long rides, or you'd like to be able to climb with a load or without being committed to working really hard, the triple would be better. A "compact" crankset would probably be okay too.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    EDIT: my Mom has an older Allez Elite that I ride when I'm visiting home. It's a pretty nice bike. They were still making them in steel at the time, though.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  4. #4
    local jackass
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    i have a 2010 allez sport compact and i love it. they are great bikes and like said the shifters are a love it or hate it thing im making due until i can afford to upgrade they shift fine i just dont like that style
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  5. #5
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    I had a 2004 Allez Sport with Tiagra/105 drivetrain. It was a triple.

    I have a 2008 Roubaix Expert with SRAM Rival compact double.

    I much prefer the double. I feel the triple doesn't go low enough to warrant the extra chain ring and the mushy shifting associated with it. The cassette on my Rival is (I forget the teeth count, but is 1t more than the largest road cassette commonly available) made up for the larger "small" front ring for climbing.

    The Allez is a good bike. Quick, climbs well and handles well and reasonably priced. The cf fork and seatpost provide some damage control for road vibration. However, I did feel beat up after 2+ hr rides. On my CF Roubaix, after 2hrs, my legs are worn, but if I fuel up, I can keep going. No shoulder, wrist, hand, butt aches...

    I didn't like the mushy, plasticky feel when shifting with the Tiagra shifters.
    Just get out and ride!

  6. #6
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    What is a "compact" roadie?
    05 Spesh Rockhopper

  7. #7
    local jackass
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    you have 2 gears up front the big ring which i never leave and then you have the granny ring for serious climbing all your doing is getting rid of that middle ring
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  8. #8
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    a triple ring has a larger big ring and a smaller small ring. they're usually 34/50, where as a triple is 30 to 52 or 54 sometimes. the idea is you run a slightly larger cassette and a compact double to get the same gearing as a smaller cassette and a triple.

    Quote Originally Posted by traffic002
    I
    I didn't like the mushy, plasticky feel when shifting with the Tiagra shifters.
    dont blame the shifters for the cables being shot/poor quality...

    most bikes with lower end parts come with lower end cables and housings. higher end bikes come with higher end cables and housings. this alone makes a huge difference!

    my sora bike shifted excellent after i put good housings on it. i have 105 now and its really not too different.

  9. #9
    CS2
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch
    Mostly fine, but the shifters blow. Or at least, I hate that kind. If you rode the bike and the thumb button thingies didn't bother you, go for it
    Too bad riders like you haven't tried Campy. Their thumb shifters are much bigger and easier to use. I'll agree that Sora thumb shifters are almost impossible to use in the drops. Maybe you can work out a deal with the LBS for a Tiagra shifter upgrade.

  10. #10
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Quote Originally Posted by CS2
    Too bad riders like you haven't tried Campy. Their thumb shifters are much bigger and easier to use. I'll agree that Sora thumb shifters are almost impossible to use in the drops. Maybe you can work out a deal with the LBS for a Tiagra shifter upgrade.
    I have tried Campy. I suppose my post was a little unclear - I meant that the Sora and 2200 shifters with thumb buttons, as on the bike referred to by the OP, blow, and I don't like their thumb buttons.

    I was quite impressed with the ones on my roommate's Campy bike. Can't remember the group.

    Watch the assumptions.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot
    a triple ring has a larger big ring and a smaller small ring. they're usually 34/50, where as a triple is 30 to 52 or 54 sometimes. the idea is you run a slightly larger cassette and a compact double to get the same gearing as a smaller cassette and a triple.


    dont blame the shifters for the cables being shot/poor quality...

    most bikes with lower end parts come with lower end cables and housings. higher end bikes come with higher end cables and housings. this alone makes a huge difference!

    my sora bike shifted excellent after i put good housings on it. i have 105 now and its really not too different.
    So what makes high end cables and housing different than lower end cables and housing? What constitutes a "good" cable/housing?

    I bought my Allez new. It felt like crap from day one. So if I had swapped out the shifter cable and housing right off the bat, the feel would be different?
    Just get out and ride!

  12. #12
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    The classic road chain ring had a large ring like 52t and a smaller ring like 42t. This coupled with a small cassette, made it so you had to be pretty fit to ride hilly terrain.

    The triple has gearing on the order of 52, 40, 30.

    The compact double is on the order 50, 36. It also usually employs a cassette that has a larger spread as well to provide equivalent top speed gearing as well as almost the climbing gearing as a triple.

    With my Allez, I found that I couldn't spin up a steep hill in the "granny" gear anyway (like I could on my mtn bike) so the compact double provided nearly the gearing (the triple still goes lower) but a simpler drivetrain.
    Just get out and ride!

  13. #13
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Quote Originally Posted by traffic002
    So what makes high end cables and housing different than lower end cables and housing? What constitutes a "good" cable/housing?

    I bought my Allez new. It felt like crap from day one. So if I had swapped out the shifter cable and housing right off the bat, the feel would be different?
    Better housings really do seem to have better shifting. I'd speculate that it's a combination of better compression resistance and less friction. The skill of the person who cuts and finishes the housings is also very important. Someone who doesn't know what they're doing can really screw up perfectly good housings, while a fairly generic shifter housing if it's routed well and the ends are done nicely works very well. I usually just buy the stuff the bike shop sells by the foot, but I spend some time on the ends.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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