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  1. #1
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    Should I move components from nice hardtail to lesser quality full suspension bike?

    So I own a really nice custom-made Carl Strong titanium hardtail. But for various reasons, I don't like riding it as much as my 2008 Specialized FSR XC Comp (specs available on Specialized website).

    As a rookie, I'm wondering... does it make sense to move all the components over to the XC? Is there any reason why this might not work or be a good fit? Then I could sell the Carl Strong frame separately.
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  2. #2
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    Well, for one thing, the seatpost isn't the same size and won't transfer. Will I run into similar problems once I start taking things apart?

  3. #3
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    It's hard it upgrade piecemeal and have any real measurable effect. This swap will have a huge positive effect on the FSR. So maybe you use the old seat post; no big deal.

    A shame you can't enjoy the Ti HT anymore but it happens.
    I don't rattle.

  4. #4
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    Common areas of non-compatibility include fork length and offset, bottom bracket sizes, steerer diameter (straight or tapered), front derailer mounting, and (as you already discovered) seat tube diameter. Additionally, disc brakes are sometimes a problem; certain brakes and rotors are wonky on certain frames. If you are unsure about any of that, you should have your bike shop check out your bikes and advise you on which parts will transfer and which won't.
    Surly Cross Check: fat tire roadie
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  5. #5
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    Thanks for the replies. I'm a little scared the bike shop will charge me an arm and a leg to swap everything over. Would rather learn myself as I go, but would be nice to know going into it how many of these problem areas of non-compatibility I'm looking at. (If anyone is near Tryon, NC and wants to help in my garage for a 6-pack, I'd be grateful. :-) )

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ymmij777 View Post
    Thanks for the replies. I'm a little scared the bike shop will charge me an arm and a leg to swap everything over. Would rather learn myself as I go, but would be nice to know going into it how many of these problem areas of non-compatibility I'm looking at. (If anyone is near Tryon, NC and wants to help in my garage for a 6-pack, I'd be grateful. :-) )
    Okay, fair enough. Itís noble to work on your own bikes. I wouldn't categorically dismiss bike shops, though. Even as a shade tree mechanic who does all my own maintenance, I find it extremely useful to cultivate a relationship with a shop. There's plenty of times when itís cheaper to have the shop do some job that requires specialized tools, like pulling cranks, than buying the tool and never using it again (or only sparingly). And along the way, I've gotten plenty of free advice and even free parts - ticky tack things like ferrules and special bolts that aren't expensive, but are a PITA to source on your own.

    So back to your situation. What you really want, if there's one nearby, is a bike co-op. Most co-ops have all the tools that bike shops have and are usually staffed by knowledgeable volunteers. You may have to pay a nominal hourly fee (and even that is usually more of a donation) to use their tools and workspace. But itís well worth it.

    I would also recommend picking up a copy of "Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance" at your favorite library or bookstore. There's lots of books on bike maintenance; I happen to very fond of Leonard Zinn's. Of course, there's also plenty of resources on the internet. Either way, you'll want to do some research before jumping into this project to get a good idea of what you need on hand to do the work - a work stand of some sort, tools, grease, lube, lock-tite, etc. I like to have the book handy to follow step by step instructions while I'm working.

    As far as your bikes go, honestly, given the time and effort that it will take to move the parts (except for the wheels), I donít think the juice is worth the squeeze for most of it. Do you need the XTR stuff on your Spesh to shave a few ounces for racing or to impress your friends? I donít know, maybe it is worth it to you then. The wheels are easy to swap, obviously, as long as the hubs are compatible. The Fox fork might be worth swapping, as long itís close to the same size as the stock fork so it doesnít throw off the handling (or you can live with it, if it does). If the steerer length and diameter are the same as the stock fork, and the crown race is the same, than itís an easy swap. If any of those are different, than itís not an easy swap. Everything elseÖ ehhh. I wouldnít bother, but Iím not you.
    Surly Cross Check: fat tire roadie
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  7. #7
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    Strip the HT and sell frame.
    Sell the XC in whole.
    Buy new updated frameset with money from sales. Swap in components.

    Do most of the work yourself, have a shop go over it once you are done to finish it off. Talk to bike shope, they might be willing to help out here and there and order parts for you. That way, you get the satisfaction and also help out your LBS.
    Just get out and ride!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by traffic002 View Post
    Strip the HT and sell frame.
    Sell the XC in whole.
    Buy new updated frameset with money from sales. Swap in components.

    Do most of the work yourself, have a shop go over it once you are done to finish it off. Talk to bike shope, they might be willing to help out here and there and order parts for you. That way, you get the satisfaction and also help out your LBS.
    The reason I say this is that '08 XC is like an '06 Stumpjumper FSR?? A lot has advanced in terms of FSR technology. So you might want to research what is out there and what frameset would work best for your current needs. Then build a bike around the desired frame.

    A lot of cost in fork, wheels, crankset, brakes. So you can re-use as much as you can. But your fork length/steertube may not be right so you may need to get a new fork. And if you do, then you'll want to go to a 15mmQR or 20mm axle. Which would require new hubs for your wheels.

    It can be a slippery slope. But it can be a great experience if you've got some budget to work with.
    Just get out and ride!

  9. #9
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    Move the best parts to the bike that you will ride the most. If that is a 20 year old clunker, that would ride better with a $1000 wheelset, so be it.
    If you don't ride the Strong, no point in keeping it. From your bike setup, you seem fairly tall. Maybe you should explore a 29er. Just taking a quick look at ebay shows that titanium frame seem to go from $700+ on Ebay, maybe move parts over (ask questions freely here if you need to) sell the frame and try out an Airborne Goblin? It's always nice to have a hardtail and a full suspension.

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