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  1. #1
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    Pivot 5.7 versus Yeti 575

    Looking for some guidance on a new bike. I am on an old hardtail and have increased my riding to 2-3 times a week in Southern California and need to step up to a FS.

    I have narrowed my search to a 26", 5+- " travel. Carbon is not a requirement. XT level components.

    I have mostly narrowed it down to the Pivot Mach 5.7 and the Yeti 575. I have considered the Mach 5, ASR 5 and either Santa Cruz LT or new LRc. I would like to support a smaller boutique brand if possible rather than a larger company (as a small business owner myself).

    I understand that there are billion options, but just curious on some feedback.

    Cheers

  2. #2
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    BTW,

    Most of my riding would be considered trail or xc( Switchbacks, some decent downhill with some smaller drops, 2-3 feet). I am 29 years old, 175lbs, intermediate skill level and my budget is around 4K, plus or minus. I love to climb as fast as possible and would like to increase my skills on the downhill.

  3. #3
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    Just because I have a Pivot, I'd have to say go for the Mach 5.7.

    If I had a Yeti, I would have said the 575.

  4. #4
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    American made frames, small business owner, pure awesomeness = Turner 5 Spot

    If not I would go with the Pivot for the DW Link alone... the Frame is made in Taiwan though I think.

    Yeti is good, but not a fan of the single pivot.

    5 Spot...

  5. #5
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    I would go with another DW link like HD140 or SL-R, if not 5 spot or M5.7, 575 is too XC even with more travel. Even BLTC is more XC than the models I mentioned above.

  6. #6
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    Just to pile on, I would chose the Pivot, but also look at the Ibis Mojo and Turner Spot.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  7. #7
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    My $0.02 Turner 5 spot or Pivot in that order Both awesome bikes, can't go wrong with either. The 575 with the carbon rear has way too much flex even in intermediate level technical stuff going downhill. Even with the aluminum rear it doesn't handle as well as either the Pivot or Turner.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the info. I'll see if I can find a Turner 5 Spot to demo. I have been on the Pivot and had a great time. I don't think I can go wrong with any of these bikes.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by papabear050
    American made frames, small business owner, pure awesomeness = Turner 5 Spot

    If not I would go with the Pivot for the DW Link alone... the Frame is made in Taiwan though I think.

    Yeti is good, but not a fan of the single pivot.

    5 Spot...
    I'm not bagging on your here or anything, but when is the last time you've ridden a single pivot bike and which year/model was it? I always wonder when I hear statements like this whether people have actually ridden a single pivot bike from the last 2 or 3 years. My linkage-actuated single pivot Tomac Snyper 140 handles awesome, and I like it better than a lot of the virtual pivot bikes I've ridden. It eats up Colorado rocks. Still, I don't think it's better or worse than VPP, DW-Link, etc, just different. It climbs great, even without ProPedal, and the suspension seems much more active on the downhill. I've never noticed any brake jack or pedal feedback either.

    Suspension design has advanced a lot. Even the venerable single pivot has come a long way, especially in the past few years. I wouldn't be afraid of the 575. Test one out, before you write the bike off just based on the suspension type alone. There are plenty of people who love that bike (just look at the reviews), so they must be doing something right. That bike ain't cheap. You really couldn't go wrong either way though. They're both excellent bikes with great customer service (so I've heard).

    I'm not just defending it because I own the bike. I'd probably be happy on a Santa Cruz or Pivot, but I really do love my Tomac.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaeckerX1
    My linkage-actuated single pivot Tomac Snyper 140 handles awesome, and I like it better than a lot of the virtual pivot bikes I've ridden. It eats up Colorado rocks. Still, I don't think it's better or worse than VPP, DW-Link, etc, just different. It climbs great, even without ProPedal, and the suspension seems much more active on the downhill. I've never noticed any brake jack or pedal feedback either.

    Suspension design has advanced a lot. Even the venerable single pivot has come a long way, especially in the past few years. I wouldn't be afraid of the 575. Test one out, before you write the bike off just based on the suspension type alone. There are plenty of people who love that bike (just look at the reviews), so they must be doing something right.
    I think you've summed it up with them being different types of bikes and needing to test them. I found the opposite to your assessment of the Tomac when I rode the Yeti 575, which is a similar design. Lots of brake jack and pedal feedback, poor climbing with lots of suspension bob unless PP was on and then the suspension wasn't as active as I would have liked. I've gone from a single pivot to horst link/FSR to VPP to DW Link and for me the DW Link system has worked the best, but I liked all of them at the time except for the single pivot. In between I've ridden a few other bikes of different design and the Pivot DW Link has still been the best for me.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by crank1979@optusnet.com.au
    I think you've summed it up with them being different types of bikes and needing to test them. I found the opposite to your assessment of the Tomac when I rode the Yeti 575, which is a similar design. Lots of brake jack and pedal feedback, poor climbing with lots of suspension bob unless PP was on and then the suspension wasn't as active as I would have liked. I've gone from a single pivot to horst link/FSR to VPP to DW Link and for me the DW Link system has worked the best, but I liked all of them at the time except for the single pivot. In between I've ridden a few other bikes of different design and the Pivot DW Link has still been the best for me.
    Yeah, it's like anything. What one person likes, another hates. I'm sure my riding style is probably a lot different than yours. It really just depends on what works well for you. Even then, like you said, some companies can take the same suspension design and do it better, or tune it differently. Even my Snyper and the 575 feel different though they are a similar design. The Snyper rear end feels stiffer for one thing (though I haven't ridden a 2011 575 with the stiffer rear triangle). Asking on the internet doesn't make much sense because opinions differ so much and everyone has what they like. I think it's important to not buy into marketing hype though or just go by what you hear. Don't just a bike by suspension design alone. I've heard so many people give bike recommendations and they sound like salesmen or bike brochures.

    OP, ride a few different bikes and decide for yourself.
    Last edited by BaeckerX1; 04-29-2011 at 02:51 PM.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmvanausdal
    I don't think I can go wrong with any of these bikes.
    That pretty well sums it up.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by crank1979@optusnet.com.au
    I think you've summed it up with them being different types of bikes and needing to test them. I found the opposite to your assessment of the Tomac when I rode the Yeti 575, which is a similar design. Lots of brake jack and pedal feedback, poor climbing with lots of suspension bob unless PP was on and then the suspension wasn't as active as I would have liked. I've gone from a single pivot to horst link/FSR to VPP to DW Link and for me the DW Link system has worked the best, but I liked all of them at the time except for the single pivot. In between I've ridden a few other bikes of different design and the Pivot DW Link has still been the best for me.
    You can't tell the ride by the linkage type, you have to look at the shock actuation also. For example the TNT Turner 5 Spot and the Ventana 5 inch bike look like identical bikes on paper. Both were single pivot linkage actuated bikes. They rode entirely differently due to pivot placement and rocker design that resulted in one having a rising shock rate and the other decreasing shock rate.

    Same goes for DW-Link designs. Dave Weagle who posts here has stated many times, he modifies linkages and ratios depending on what the manufacture is looking for. Pivot goes for a racier, firmer feel, Ibis for the plush endless travel, and Turner somewhere in between. All are DW bikes, but between their different geometry and designer preferences, ride differently.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by CDMC
    You can't tell the ride by the linkage type, you have to look at the shock actuation also. For example the TNT Turner 5 Spot and the Ventana 5 inch bike look like identical bikes on paper. Both were single pivot linkage actuated bikes. They rode entirely differently due to pivot placement and rocker design that resulted in one having a rising shock rate and the other decreasing shock rate.

    Same goes for DW-Link designs. Dave Weagle who posts here has stated many times, he modifies linkages and ratios depending on what the manufacture is looking for. Pivot goes for a racier, firmer feel, Ibis for the plush endless travel, and Turner somewhere in between. All are DW bikes, but between their different geometry and designer preferences, ride differently.
    Yeah I know. That's why I agreed that testing them was important and said the Pivot DW Link design has been best for me.

  15. #15
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    The Pivot is better bike. The frame is stiffer and the suspension is better. I'm sure the 575 can be built up a little lighter though.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaeckerX1
    I'm not bagging on your here or anything, but when is the last time you've ridden a single pivot bike and which year/model was it? I always wonder when I hear statements like this whether people have actually ridden a single pivot bike from the last 2 or 3 years. My linkage-actuated single pivot Tomac Snyper 140 handles awesome, and I like it better than a lot of the virtual pivot bikes I've ridden. It eats up Colorado rocks. Still, I don't think it's better or worse than VPP, DW-Link, etc, just different. It climbs great, even without ProPedal, and the suspension seems much more active on the downhill. I've never noticed any brake jack or pedal feedback either.

    Suspension design has advanced a lot. Even the venerable single pivot has come a long way, especially in the past few years. I wouldn't be afraid of the 575. Test one out, before you write the bike off just based on the suspension type alone. There are plenty of people who love that bike (just look at the reviews), so they must be doing something right. That bike ain't cheap. You really couldn't go wrong either way though. They're both excellent bikes with great customer service (so I've heard).

    I'm not just defending it because I own the bike. I'd probably be happy on a Santa Cruz or Pivot, but I really do love my Tomac.
    I agree although I've never been on the Snyper but I heard it's a good bike. I've ridden and own many Single pivot Santa Cruz and Cannondale, Foes, ect they are great riding bike and I agree the brake jack is only pronounce when you are riding back to back with bikes like Ells or ABP.

    I said before most top name bikes would perform about 90% of each other or it can not stay in the competition. They would climb and descend well. The difference is the 10% that counts for better braking performance, geometry, shock rate, adaptability ie rear axle choice, bb ect.

    For example the comparison between 575 and mach 5. Both bike climb well and descend well and both can rip on the singletrack and eat the tech section. 575 may have longer travel but decidedly more XC than M5. because of the geometry. It's more like an aggressive XC than AM. M5. feel more compact and lower CG pair it with the adj seatpost it's very easy to hang your mass over the back it also feel plusher than the 575.

    Riders who prefer XC style would like the 575, rider who likes more aggressive style would like the Mach5 or 5.7 because their design trades, but to say that one is 100% better design than the other is just BS. We are all have our favorite and it's ok to be bias I love my ML8 I can climb better and descend with more confidence I know it's more me than the bike but who cares

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885
    I would go with another DW link like HD140 or SL-R, if not 5 spot or M5.7, 575 is too XC even with more travel. Even BLTC is more XC than the models I mentioned above.
    How does the SL-R ride?

  18. #18
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    Not available til June but it should be!tchen!

  19. #19
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    Got a Mach 5.7 and so far it is great. Made a few small tweaks and dialed it in. Climbs great, no dissapointments. Thanks for the input everyone, see you on the hills.

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