Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    165

    Need help with a rebuild

    I have an old Giant Rincon circa 1993 if I am reading the serial number right that I want to get updated a little. I never really rode much trails with it, but it was my all around bike in high school then sat for years in my parents basement til I took it back out last year. Mostly just around town with it after a light tune up and ended up getting a 2012 Trek 4900 that is going to be my main trail rider.

    So, I want to spruce up the Giant just a little to ride around on streets, paved bike paths and maybe an occasional smooth hardpack trail, and will just be an around town bike.

    So, I want to get a couple little updates on the cheap, think I would like to swap the brakes from a traditional cantilever to a V-brake, maybe get a quill adapter to be able to swap out stems more easily, thinking maybe handlebars new grips, etc. The shifting seems to do just fine and I am ok with the shifters for what they need to do, so thinking I will just clean up the drivetrain and stick with the shifters I have, probably. Also figured that gets into bigger money.

    So, any advice? Any good inexpensive parts? I see a lot of offerings from Origin8, is that crap stuff or ok? Any other words of wisdom? What would you do? What parts manufacturers are cheap but worth putting on?

  2. #2
    banned
    Reputation: marpilli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    3,993
    I think it's a great idea. I have a '92 Giant Yukon that I use as a pavement bike.

    If it's going to stay on paved/gravel trails, you should be fine with a quill adapter and just about any brand of bars.

    For mine I replaced the tires, grips, seat,chain and cables. Cleaned up the shifters and hubs and it runs like a dream. If you want to save a bit of cash, replace the pads on your canti's and adjust them. Cantilever brakes work great with the new pads and properly adjusted.


  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    165
    Look great!

    I replaced the pads and tried to adjust them, although it was probably more me than the brakes.....it was a giant PITA. I still can't get them to work just right, but maybe new cables would fix that. I did find an Origin8 V-brake kit on sale, comes with both brakes w/ pads, both levers and new cables all for $27, so that's why I figured the upgrade would be worth it on a deal.

    I am a little leary getting into it as I haven't really built or rebuilt a bike before, just done the basic chain cleaning, tire changes and maintenance stuff but I think it should be fun.

  4. #4
    banned
    Reputation: marpilli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    3,993
    Thank you! I agree that adjusting cantilever brakes is not easy. I still don't think I have mine just right. But, they work a lot better than they did at first.

    I think these types of bikes are great for learning basic maintenance. Search google, watch youtube videos, and ask questions in the right forums on here and all of your questions will be answered.

    Regarding the v-brake upgrade, are your brake levers integrated with the shifter pods? If so, then you're probably looking at a bit more costs as you'd either need to buy separate shifters or new v-brake compatible integrated shifters. If I remember correctly, cantilever brake levers have a different pull distance than v-brake levers and there's some compatibility issue...

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    165
    No my brake levers are seperate, and the kit I found comes with the new levers included. It really is a steal, for $27 you get both brake assemblies front and back, pads for both, cables and housings and the new levers as well.

    I am considering new shifters but they work fine for now and I can look at that later if I want to tackle that. The saddle and seatpost on there now sucks, so those are high on my list and I would like a different handlebar so that's driving the stem and threadless adapter. Basically I also just kinda want a project I can afford and something other than my good bikes to have to fiddle with.

    Oh, my post count is high enough now I can drop a picture on. I think I am going to pull the trigger on some parts this week, just wanted to make sure I had my stuff figured out first before going ahead.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Need help with a rebuild-imag0862.jpg  


  6. #6
    banned
    Reputation: marpilli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    3,993
    Quote Originally Posted by kwikshift View Post
    Basically I also just kinda want a project I can afford and something other than my good bikes to have to fiddle with.
    I think this is the key. If you find you enjoy replacing the brakes, tackle the quill adapter. Move on from there. I built my first bike up from frame last year with almost no bike mechanical experience. I learned a ton and loved every minute of it. It's actually kind of addicting. Watch out...

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    165
    Quote Originally Posted by marpilli View Post
    I learned a ton and loved every minute of it. It's actually kind of addicting. Watch out...
    That's really what I would like to do!

    But, I don't know enough about parts now to know what I want. In the back of my head I am thinking a year or two down the road once I know what I want and where to get it I will eventually do a frame up build. Right now I am trying to learn....hence all the questions.

  8. #8
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,123
    Learning is awesome and so is keeping an old bike you like running. I don't see anything wrong with the Origin 8 V-brake kit, seems like it would do a fine job. Do you have a rear cable stop on your bike for the brake? My old bike had a welded on "noodle" that the cable routed through and down to the brake. It meant that in order to put V-brakes on my old bike I needed to get a back stop but once I got that everything works perfectly.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    165
    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    Learning is awesome and so is keeping an old bike you like running. I don't see anything wrong with the Origin 8 V-brake kit, seems like it would do a fine job. Do you have a rear cable stop on your bike for the brake? My old bike had a welded on "noodle" that the cable routed through and down to the brake. It meant that in order to put V-brakes on my old bike I needed to get a back stop but once I got that everything works perfectly.
    It's got a center pull cantilever so it has a stop on the rear fork and another on the top tube. On the front it has a stop at the top of the headset. I thought though with the noodle you don't need a stop in the front, and I think the one on the top tube was sufficient for the V-brake on the back. That back stop thing is pretty sweet though, good to know. Thanks for that tip!

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    165
    One thing I am a little worried about is getting the handlebar high enough. As you can see from the pic I have it up really high....this is necessary cause I am all legs short torso, so my saddle is crazy high. With that old quill style I can easily get the handlebar up high, was wondering once I put in an adapter and drop a stem on there if I will have trouble getting it up sufficiently high. That said I figured I could make up the difference partially with a riser style handlebar. Right now I am just looking around at websites at the different stuff available, currently my conceptual configuration is that I would have the quill adapter and have that as high as the indicator on the min insertion will allow, a short upright stem, like a 70mm at 35 degrees or something, then a riser handlebar, seems like I can get stuff with like a 50mm rise.

    Hope it's cool to post links and I am not stepping on the rules, here's a combo I was considering.
    Adapter..
    Products Description – ORIGIN-8

    Stem
    Products Description – ORIGIN-8

    Handlebar
    Products Description – ORIGIN-8

    I am not set on these at all, just what I have stumbled upon so far. I should be able to bolt up the shifters right to these handlebars and I could use a recommendation for some grips, but there are plenty of basic grips out there.

    Also, any recommendations on decent enough but inexpensive saddles and seat posts. I am not a super clyde, but I am about 6'3" and running between 210-230 depending on the season, so gotta make sure I can hold myself up with whatever I get.

  11. #11
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,123
    You'll be fine on the front brake, I just wanted to mention that not all rear brakes were V compatible without a bit of work.

    As for the stem, I don't see any reason you should abandon the current bar/stem setup unless this is going to be your primary bike. I hate those stem adapters because they add another point of failure and need for attention to the most important interface on the bike. If you really wanted to get a threadless stem then get a new fork and headset to match.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    165
    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    You'll be fine on the front brake, I just wanted to mention that not all rear brakes were V compatible without a bit of work.

    As for the stem, I don't see any reason you should abandon the current bar/stem setup unless this is going to be your primary bike. I hate those stem adapters because they add another point of failure and need for attention to the most important interface on the bike. If you really wanted to get a threadless stem then get a new fork and headset to match.
    1" Forks available with threadless? I thought I was stuck with the fork I head because the size of the head tube? If not I would consider it for down the road as an option. There are also some single piece quill stems that would allow me to swap out handlebars easier, maybe I should consider those?

    Products Description – ORIGIN-8

    Products Description – ORIGIN-8

    Or maybe I just want to swap out to a threadless fork? I didn't think those were around, but I guess they are, even it seems 1" threadless with suspension. Huh, this gives me more to think about...I thought I was stuck with just an adapter as an option. Interesting.

  13. #13
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,123
    Quote Originally Posted by kwikshift View Post
    1" Forks available with threadless? I thought I was stuck with the fork I head because the size of the head tube? If not I would consider it for down the road as an option. There are also some single piece quill stems that would allow me to swap out handlebars easier, maybe I should consider those?

    Products Description – ORIGIN-8

    Products Description – ORIGIN-8

    Or maybe I just want to swap out to a threadless fork? I didn't think those were around, but I guess they are, even it seems 1" threadless with suspension. Huh, this gives me more to think about...I thought I was stuck with just an adapter as an option. Interesting.
    Or just not replace your bars. What's your hurry to spend money?
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    165
    No hurry to spend money, but I don't like what I have on there, and if I can find an affordable solution that makes me happy and gives me what I am looking for....what's the big deal?

    The Quills and stems I am finding are running in the $20 range, and I found a whole new front fork for $36 if I go that route, it's not big numbers we are talking about here. At this point everything I have talked about all totaled up would cost less than if you took you bike into the LBS for a general tune up.

    I am looking to understand what it would cost, understand my options and find the right, and affordable, way to get the bike to be something I want to ride. I would rather put an extra $30-40 into it and be happy with what I have. I don't see myself dropping tons of cash on the bike, but at some point the fact that I can have a project and the actual work and upgrades are fun for me as much as the ride will be, and I learn something in the process...doesn't seem like a waste.

    Beside....who gets into hobbies to be financiers?

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CharleyGnarlyP290's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    154
    This is my kind of topic.
    I recently did something similar to what you are wanting to do. I have a '96 GF Mamba that I updated/upgraded. I used Shimano brakes on it because I got a really good deal on them, but used Origin8 levers. I did put some Origin8 brakes on my single speed project and they work really well. My son also got an Origin8 crank for his SS/fixed and they have worked out great. He really likes them. So, as far as the brand goes, they seem to be good bang for the buck.
    I used a quill adapter on my Mamba at first, but switched to a rigid fork so went threadless. I did end up with a shorter stem and riser bar to get it a little higher.
    As far as the 1" threadless, I went that route on my SS project. Worked out great.
    If you have any specific questions, let me know as I learned a bunch on both projects.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    165
    That's great info thanks!

    I sorta kicked off work last night, got the bike up in the repair stand and pulled the some stuff apart. The seatpost was a very tight fit but worked out and had a spare saddle that I put on there. The old seatpost was a different style and I couldn't mount up normals saddles to it, so that was first. I pulled the chain, cassette and derailleur and cleaned it up, de-greased etc, etc and put it all back on there. Got new shifter cable and housing onto the rear, gotta get the front done still. Should see the brakes coming in soon and I have a spare set of tires to mount up, some fresh grips and clean it all up.

    I am going to leave the handlebars alone for right now and just ride it a little and then decide if I really need to monkey with the front end or if I am happy with it as it sits.
    2015 Trek Domane 4.5 Disc
    2015 Trek Fuel EX 8
    2015 Gravity Bullseye Monster LTD
    2012 Trek 4900
    1993 Giant Rincon

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •