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  1. #1
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    Need advice on new bike

    I am interested in buying a full suspension XC bike and I need a few suggestions. Here's some info on me first. I currently ride a Specialized Hardrock Disc. I'm 31 years old, 6' and 180lbs. I am looking to spend around $2000. I like riding long distances with light trails.
    I have test ridden a Cannondale Rush 6 and I was very impressed, although it was a bit on the heavy side. My LBS had it for $1800. I am also looking at either a Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Comp or a FSRxc Pro. Are there any other models I should be looking at? For my riding style should I look into a 29er? I would appreciate any advice. Pics are also welcome


    Thanks in advance,
    Tim

  2. #2
    2010 RockHopper Comp Disc
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    Just a question of why a Full Suspension for XC. You will wasting massive amounts of energy with such a set up.

  3. #3
    I'm SUCH a square....
    Reputation: bigpedaler's Avatar
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    Untrue. Modern suspension designs don't sap energy like they did even five years ago.

    Being a 6-footer, you could easily roll a 29er if you chose; that would also give you the option of staying with a hardtail, as 29er HT's seem to handle off-road a touch easier.

    I won't throw any alternate ideas at you, as my tastes in bikes are quite different than yours. Just find what best suits you; take your time and enjoy the research.
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  4. #4
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    You probably want to stick with something light and thats available. The most popular XC bikes in the past couple of years have been the Specialized Stumpjumper, Specialized Epic, Trek Fuel EX-8 and 7, and Giant Anthem and Trance. I would probably start looking at the lightest of the bikes which I think would be the Anthem, Epic and Stumpjumper and find one that had a good fit. A steep discount on any of these bikes would be attractive.

  5. #5
    2010 RockHopper Comp Disc
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    Untrue. Modern suspension designs don't sap energy like they did even five years ago.
    any suspension saps energy, no matter how efficient it is.

  6. #6
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
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    yes and no

    racers use FS bikes so save energy that is sapped by HTs on rough courses, and to avoid early fatigue HTs deliver on those harder courses. They use HTs for smooth courses.

    For the recreational rider, FS can offer a better experience, and given they aren't racing, an FS bike is often a better choice, especially for older riders.

    Just another .02, Jim

  7. #7
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    Doood, the VAST majority of bikes on the market are made at the same factory, and yes, is owned by Giant. This does NOT mean they are all Giant knockoffs OR that they are all the same, it just means that quality mass production is cheaper if done at one large factory, rather than spread out over 50 different ones, so don't read to much into that.

    Each frame is engineered specifically by the company who's name goes on'em based on what they think will work, and each has a little different geometry cause our bodies all have a little different geometry.

    Been head of the MB Patrol for one of the biggest clubs in the mid-west for a few years and I got 3800 miles of singletrack on my 07, (3800 is not a typo- although I am on my 3rd frame, broke the last one winning the "just for fun mens solo" class at the 24 hours of 9 mile 3 weeks ago) and I always tell people in your shoes this:

    Start at the bike shop closest to your house and start riding bikes in your price range. pay attention to components, similar priced bikes should have similar components. After riding a few bikes usually one will say THIS IS IT loud and clear. It will just fit, and you'll know it when it's close. Don't be afraid to use the adjustments on the seat and stem to dial it in before you lay down the cash, and most of all, find one that fits and does what you want it to. Ignore the name on the frame UNLESS, after considering more than one bike for fit, components and price you still have a tie- THEN buy the one that you think has the coolest reputation!!

    And if one of the bike shops closest to your house treats you like a dip-noob or you just don't feel comfortable hanging out there, go to the one that's next closest to your house.

    AND MOST IMPORTANT! 70% of men age 25-50 has a MTbike hanging in the garage that they haven't ridden in 6 months. Don't be one of those doods. Ride fast, Crash hard, Die in a big ball of flames!
    Believe in yourself? Well, of course. Just be aware that believing in myself has been the root cause of most of my injuries!

  8. #8
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    Thanks for all the info everyone. I am going this weekend to try out a few different bikes.

  9. #9
    I'm SUCH a square....
    Reputation: bigpedaler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeaverTail
    any suspension saps energy, no matter how efficient it is.
    Once again, untrue. I won't even get into the claims of all the manufacturers -- I will just relate my personal experience, which is this: my 5.7" f/r suspension does not bob AT ALL, detracts NOTHING from my pedaling.

    You're entitled to your opinion, just don't present it as fact.
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  10. #10
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    Any other suggestions?

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