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  1. #51
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    I think I began participating in this discussion with a very clear statement...

    "My opinion, you can fit in the smaller frame."

    I did not represent myself as any sort of bike fitting guru. Nor did I propose that my advice would make his bike fit perfectly. .

    Doc, my advice was given to help you fit better, not perfectly. Swap some parts that you already have, adjust a thing or two, and explore. If you read through that advice, at the end of the day you'll be be able to decide if you fixed your problem and all it cost you is elbow grease. If the advice doesnt fix the problem, then you can sit down and assess your situation and move forward.

    Your other option is to not even think, pull out your credit card, and buy a new frame. But then, if you didnt think it over, and did not try things with your current frame, you may end up buying, another frame that does not fit.

    I could be wrong. Shoot, I just got assessed that I'm riding a bike thats too small for me. Maybe he's right. I dont know. What I do know is there is nothing wrong with testing. Specially if it doesnt cost a thing.

    p.s. I try and keep an open mind. So I brought out my HT Cannondale with a 17 inch seat tube and 23 inch top tube and compared it with my Trek, 15.5 ST and 21.7 TT. did some cruising in front of the house. It has to be said that both bikes have been tinkered with to fit me. As I have previously known, I do like my smaller frame. Specially when I start moving around in the cockpit for techy sections. Thats why I bought it. I cant seem to move enough to influence the bike as much as I'd like with a bigger frame. It pedals amazingly better too. Where the small frame sucks is climbing torque. It has way too much torque climbing, and this makes me have to move over the bb quite a bit. On the bigger frame, I can sit and grind.

    As with any frame discussion, thats just me
    Last edited by bing!; 09-09-2010 at 10:48 PM.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Tweedbucket
    Ok, got it. I was thinking sweeping back a bit would move me back as well, but I'll rotate them up a bit. All I need is an offset seatpost to get that part closer, and I should be ready for a few more miles. Thanks for all the help!
    yes, you can move back, but you need to look at the parts. you are shortening your cockpit and then trying to compensate by moving the seat back, and thus losing your seating position.

    i'd rather have a good seat position, and bit more upright than having to shift way back.

    the problem is the shortness. you can compensate your standing weight bias by leaning yourself backwards instead of standing and lurching forward. it can be a bit awkward, but you can do it.

    it seems people are telling you to buy a new bike. *shrug*, sure go ahead, but that shouldn't stop you from making the most of what you have in the mean time. you're not really buying anything, just making adjustments...which is free except for time. you *need* to do this, for yourself. this is time to invest in your own knowledge of your necessary measurements. This is so you know what you would like instead of listening to joe schmoe salesman trying to make a profit.

  3. #53
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    Well, the bottom line is, this bike bit me hard twice in a year (ER both times), so while I'm slowing down and making a lot of adjustments, I'll still test ride some larger framed bikes and see how they feel in comparison. I'm sure going up one size would be to my liking, and I'll probably go that direction, but in the mean time, I appreciate the adjustment advice. At least I can use the bike through the end of the season here and then work something else out for next year.

    Mountain bike riding is the new dirt bike riding. It's cheaper and you don't get shot at as often.

  4. #54
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    Tweed - listen to Berkeley Mike, and AZ.MTNS
    The 8500 is too small.

    We are similar in height, I'm 5'6.5" I tend to like frames with an ETT around 22.5" and can make anything from 22" to 23" work.

    This geometry chart shows a good diagram on how it's measured, it's "D":
    http://www2.giant-bicycles.com/en-us...llections_id=4

    I'll also add my opinion on rotating riser bars: While you can rotate them forward, or back to slightly compensate fit, I'm in the camp where that's a "no-no."
    Sight from behind, level with the bars, front tire straight ahead - rotate them forward, and back - you will see the ends angle up and down - you want them to be parallel to the ground.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by deoreo
    Sight from behind, level with the bars, front tire straight ahead - rotate them forward, and back - you will see the ends angle up and down - you want them to be parallel to the ground.
    bingo.

    it's currently rotated into the cockpit. put it in it's proper position and leave it. it's just awkward right now.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by deoreo
    Tweed - listen to Berkeley Mike, and AZ.MTNS
    The 8500 is too small.

    We are similar in height, I'm 5'6.5" I tend to like frames with an ETT around 22.5" and can make anything from 22" to 23" work.

    This geometry chart shows a good diagram on how it's measured, it's "D":
    http://www2.giant-bicycles.com/en-us...llections_id=4

    I'll also add my opinion on rotating riser bars: While you can rotate them forward, or back to slightly compensate fit, I'm in the camp where that's a "no-no."
    Sight from behind, level with the bars, front tire straight ahead - rotate them forward, and back - you will see the ends angle up and down - you want them to be parallel to the ground.


    Yeah, it's been a tough lesson learned believe me. I'll have to measure the 'D' spec on the 8500 and then again on the 8000 and then shoot for something in between. I took it out on a ride today, but am taking it pretty slow. It's better with the adjustments, but still has that twitchy, unstable feeling (mainly at slow speeds). I'll go bike or at least frame shopping this winter and try to get something together by next spring. I need to buy a new furnace first.
    Mountain bike riding is the new dirt bike riding. It's cheaper and you don't get shot at as often.

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