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  1. #1
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    Having problem climbing with this bike setup ? Is the geometry right for me ?

    Hi guys...

    I'm currently riding an 18" EPX Terrashark with the following specs :

    The geometry is for an 18 frame with a 165mm shock and high rise rear mount fitted with a 100mm travel fork. Rear travel is 129mm or 5.

    Frame size 18"
    Seat Tube Length 460mm
    Chainstay Length 425mm
    Wheelbase 1092mm
    Top Tube Length 625mm
    Head Tube Length 130mm
    Fork Rake 38mm
    Bottom Bracket Height 305mm
    Bottom Bracket Drop 35mm
    Seat Post Diameter 31.6mm
    Seat Tube Angle 71.5 degree
    Head Tube Angle 70.5 degree

    I'm 6 feet tall with an inseam of 78cm and weight approx. 215lbs..

    My current ride, I'm using a Marzocchi MX Pro Lo 100mm travel with RP23 7.5" rear shock ..

    This is the picture..


    Just need advise on the riding geometry if anyone knows it...the stock setup was also a 100mm front fork with a Fox Float RC of 6.5 X 1.25 ..

    My problem is climbing a terrain or tarmac road with these bikes are 'hell' ...somehow i am always slower than my friends which they are on Santa cruz or even Specialized...

    Thanks..

  2. #2
    Stiff yet compliant
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    I sincerely doubt that it is the geometry (and no one can tell just from looking at the bike anyway).

    If you are slower, it is most likely b/c the bike is heavier or the engine is weaker.

    V.
    EMD9, drop-bar Bandersnatch, Surly LHT, a couple of Ridleys
    ... and a lot more bruises than can be counted

  3. #3
    550
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    newble
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    For me personally, I am horrible at climbing. What you have to do when you aren't riding is train for it I guess.

    I know I need more endurance and I found out grass trails are AWESOME for your endurance levels. So instead of hitting my favorite trails, I will spend some time working up my endurance.

    As well once winter hits I will be in the gym trying to really work on climbing.

    I think the bike is rarely at fault (although I love to blame mine haha)



    Start working them hills! :-)

  4. #4
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    At your height, I think an 18" frame may be a little too small, but your problem is likely more related to your fitness level and/or technique. Equipment fit does play a role and some bikes absolutely climb better than others, but the rider tends to be the most important element.
    Warning: may contain sarcasm and/or crap made up in an attempt to feel important.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by magpies14
    Hi guys...

    I'm currently riding an 18" EPX Terrashark with the following specs :

    The geometry is for an 18 frame with a 165mm shock and high rise rear mount fitted with a 100mm travel fork. Rear travel is 129mm or 5.

    Frame size 18"
    Seat Tube Length 460mm
    Chainstay Length 425mm
    Wheelbase 1092mm
    Top Tube Length 625mm
    Head Tube Length 130mm
    Fork Rake 38mm
    Bottom Bracket Height 305mm
    Bottom Bracket Drop 35mm
    Seat Post Diameter 31.6mm
    Seat Tube Angle 71.5 degree
    Head Tube Angle 70.5 degree

    I'm 6 feet tall with an inseam of 78cm and weight approx. 215lbs..

    My current ride, I'm using a Marzocchi MX Pro Lo 100mm travel with RP23 7.5" rear shock ..

    This is the picture..


    Just need advise on the riding geometry if anyone knows it...the stock setup was also a 100mm front fork with a Fox Float RC of 6.5 X 1.25 ..

    My problem is climbing a terrain or tarmac road with these bikes are 'hell' ...somehow i am always slower than my friends which they are on Santa cruz or even Specialized...

    Thanks..
    If the bike is comfortable, then I doubt the geo is the issue climbing a road. Maybe look at your tire selection and pressure? Also, that might not be the best climbing design out there.

    But realistically, it's probably just the engine.

  6. #6
    BBW
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    Check your saddle height: make sure you have a good leg extension without locking your knee.
    What problem do you have? I would think that the bike its/could be a little small for your height... you should be on a 21 or so.
    problem with the front wheel lifting?

  7. #7
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    Agree with Trailville, bike is a little small for you but not the real reason.

    For your height the weight is not climbers weight. The ones you see with the polka dot climbers jersey at the Tour de France are all reed thin. The ones with muscular physique are sprinters. Lose some weight and you have less to carry against gravity.

    Anyway, are you running out of breath or are the thighs burning or both? Learn spinning. Start with an easy gear (granny & biggest gear at the back). Eventually you will progress into the harder gears. If you cannot spin the easy gears, the more you cannot spin the big gears to make you fast.

  8. #8
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    Geometry is sometime a compromise between going up and going down. An 18 inch bike I think would actually put you in a better position for going up hills than a 20 inch bike where you would find yourself further behind the seat. Pedal bob can also sap some energy so if you are standing and pedaling out of the seat and the bike is bobbing you are wasting some energy.
    The 625 mm effective top tube seems a little long to me and you might find yourself too far behind the seat. A shorter top tube however might mean you are behind the seat on descents. Next time you are climbing with a friend who has a simlar bike ask to ride his for about 20 yards or try sliding forward a bit on the seat and see if it gets easier. Stumpjumper for the 17.5 inch bike is 587 mm.

  9. #9
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    thanks for the response...really appreciate it...

    Well basically i am problem with running out of breath faster than normal when climbing...my pedaling cycles seems in tandem with my friends...but somehow they still ride pass me with ease...at many times, my front wheel wheelies while climbing terrains....

    And i do find my top tube a little far up forward, i have to really sit really forward when i climb...else my front wheels will lift a lot of times....

    I think most of you guys are right, my weight is a major setback for climbs...215lbs is not a climbers ideal weight....and also my engine (mainly the lungs) need improvement for sure...

    Will need to start doing my evening jogs when possible...to build my endurance...

  10. #10
    550
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    newble
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    I'm serious do some grass riding. I ride grass on my single speed and after ward I'm about ready to die. I had my buddies dad OWN me the other day. I can't even explain how badly he owned me. We would start off together and all of a sudden he was gone, looong gone.

  11. #11
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    got it 550...will start training up my endurance from now onwards....thks guys..

  12. #12
    550
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    newble
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    Oh man... you will thank yourself every time. Just remember it may hurt and it may be hard now, but there will be a time when you hit a hill that you never could before and you'll be like hell yeah!

    I know it sounds cheesy but I just started really endurance training just so I can have more fun when I hit my favorite techy trails. I ride SS so hills are a bear sometimes, but there is some definite accomplishment in hitting stuff you couldn't before :-).

    You'll notice gains fairly quick. Basically I try to get in 15 miles of rough pedaling a day (it's ok if you can't... work slowly and don't get hurt) but always remember to push just a little bit more everyday.

    Good luck man!

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