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  1. #1
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    Having hardtail buyer's remorse

    I just got a UCC (Taiwain) hardtail mountain bike. Now, I wonder if I should have bought a full suspension. It bugs me. I mainly just ride around town, and maybe a dirt road here and there, but still, the fact that I could have had rear suspension, and I do not, bugs me. Could anyone console my OCD?

  2. #2
    dru
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    I mainly just ride around town, and maybe a dirt road here and there,
    I'd be almost angry for getting a bike with any suspension for what you are describing, including having a fork.

    If you are lucky your fork will have lock out so your energy doesn't get sucked up by the fork as you are riding along.

    A rigid bike, cyclocross, townie, or even a road bike would all be better choices. A hardtail is a better choice than a fully, no doubt about it.

    There, feel better?
    occasional cyclist

  3. #3
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    For what you are describing you use it for, a hardtail is the way to go. In fact, it might be too much suspension. I'd have gone with a hybrid or fully rigid.
    Nathan

  4. #4
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    I think this whole catagory of bikes should be changed to All Terrain Bikes instead of Mountain Bikes. I'd like to know what percentage of MTB's actually ever make it to something that even resembles a mountain trail. Way too may people are sold and buy bikes based on a fantasy rather than where the bike will actually be ridden.

  5. #5
    dru
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    I'm guessing because the sport originated riding down a mountain? Beleive me, if I could afford to take another trip to the mountains to ride I'd do it in a heartbeat.

    As it sits, I ride XC bikes, and a roade bike.
    occasional cyclist

  6. #6
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    mountain matt (ironic name, if you never ride mountains?) - assuming you're for real and not just trolling, rear suspension does not make a bike better, just different. For riding around town, rear suspension adds more cost, more weight, more maintenance requirements, and less pedalling effeciency. And its probably more theft-prone too. So if you're just thinking to yourself "I coulda got a better bike" - don't! You've got a better bike for what you ride than the most expensive, most sophisticated dually on the market. If you genuinely think the ride is too harsh, try lowering your rear tire pressure. And if that doesn't do the trick, go get yourself the widest slick or short-knobbed (i.e. high volume) tire that will fit in your frame and run that in the rear at a nice low pressure (lowest you can go without pinchflatting - depends on your weight). That should have you rolling smooth. But if that still isn't enough, I highly - HIGHLY - recommend the Brooks Champion Flyer saddle. The combination of stretched leather and stiff springs absolutely ELIMINATES small bumps without the pogoing you get from cheap rear suspension or a suspension seatpost . Anyway, hope that sooths your OCD a little.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dru View Post
    I'm guessing because the sport originated riding down a mountain? Beleive me, if I could afford to take another trip to the mountains to ride I'd do it in a heartbeat.

    As it sits, I ride XC bikes, and a roade bike.
    Yes, the term originated from American mountain biking's origins in Marin County in the 70's. The guys who used to meet up and bomb down Mount Tam on old beater paper boy bikes called those bikes thier "mountain bikes" to distinguish them from their "road" bikes, as most of them raced on the road as well. Back then, nobody said "road bike"; those style bikes were almost universally called "10 speeds". (my parents still say that) Anyway, eventually those guys developed speciallized frames for offroad riding and adapted parts from touring bikes (cantilever brakes and wide gear drivetrains) and motorcycles (flat handlebars and brake levers) to create what we would recognize as a mountain bike. Two of those guys, Gary Fisher and Charlie Kelly, started a company called Mountain Bikes to make and sell these creations. The name stuck and got applied to all off road bikes, sort of like Kleenex or Lego. And the rest is history. I think I got the story mostly right, but if not, I'm sure someone will come along and correct me. Merry Christmas everyone!

  8. #8
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    Sounds like I ride a lot more XC terrain than you and I love my hardtail. Full suspension for what you are currently doing is overkill IMO. Also, with additional moving parts comes additional maintenance. So unless you are up for spending more time fine tuning and maintaining your ride (which can be very gratifying), I think you are good. If you are thinking/worrying that your bike is not "enough" or somehow outdated, that is certainly not the case.

    Just ride and have fun! There will be plenty of time to work up to a FS if that's the kind of riding you start doing.

  9. #9
    Vincit qui patitur
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    For now and what you are doing it sounds like a good ride.
    If a rigid is good for these guys it should be for you too:
    Welcome, Bienvenue, Bienvenido a... | Tour Divide
    BTW I have a hardtail, FS and soon a fully rigid.
    Just get another one later.
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  10. #10
    Rogue Exterminator
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainmatt View Post
    I just got a UCC (Taiwain) hardtail mountain bike. Now, I wonder if I should have bought a full suspension. It bugs me. I mainly just ride around town, and maybe a dirt road here and there, but still, the fact that I could have had rear suspension, and I do not, bugs me. Could anyone console my OCD?
    Not only am I trying to figure out why the hell you want a rear suspension, but I am also trying to figure out why the hell you want any suspension.

  11. #11
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    This is a job for no suspension...a road bike

  12. #12
    FKA Malibu412
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    Not only am I trying to figure out why the hell you want a rear suspension, but I am also trying to figure out why the hell you want any suspension.
    Cuz all the cool kids are on their Walmart Schwinn, Mongoose and Next full suspension bikes.
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  13. #13
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    Sounds like a rigid fixie with a carbon fork might suit you better. Spend the same money you spent on the forks on decent components instead

  14. #14
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    Fly your OCD flag - but fly it somewhere else. As others have said - you really don't need any suspension for what you are doing, but if you have to have one (which you do in the front) that is more than sufficient. The hardtail will out climb all but the most expensive full sus bikes (and most of them if all things are otherwise equal) and every time you climb a hill you can thank yourself for your wise purchase. Even on the trails the hard tail will teach you how to pick a line better than the full sus bike because you will do better going in between rocks rather than cruising over them. Of course I ride a hard tail (in the mountains) and love it most of the time. Even after doing demos on full suspension bikes that I can't afford - I generally go back over the same trail on my hard tail and convince myself that I still like it better (especially considering the costs). Of course there are some full sus bikes that I dream about and lust after. I just go climb a hill and I'm usually pretty gratified that I'm riding a hard tail since I'm not that good a climber. Even rock gardens aren't bad as long as I'm standing up like I'm supposed to do. There are some rocky climbs where a rear suspension can add some traction by keeping the rear on the ground, but by that time I'm generally doing a Hike-a-bike by then so it doesn't matter.
    Learn to ride on your hard tail - by the time you are proficient (assuming you ever take it off the road) you will have a better idea on how to spend your money when buying your next bike. Remember - you didn't buy the bike as a lifetime investment. Just like motorcycles....they make new improved models every year. A 2012/13 bike is typically loads better than a 5 year old model. Otherwise we would all still be riding Schwin English Racers - (anyone remember those?_ I still remember my first bike with 3 gears. I was da bomb riding that baby around the neighborhood. Beat the heck out of my fat tired paperboy bike (wish I still had it though).

  15. #15
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    you're describing my commuter bike.
    Basically a steel frame road bike with fender clearance and disc brakes (I ride in the rain with hills.)

    My "Mountain Bike" is ridden on slick roots and rocks and steep hills. I cringe at having to hit asphalt on those expensive sticky tires.

    BTW, my mountain bike is a steel framed hardtail with 6" of travel.
    Just get out and ride!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saddle Up View Post
    I think this whole catagory of bikes should be changed to All Terrain Bikes instead of Mountain Bikes. I'd like to know what percentage of MTB's actually ever make it to something that even resembles a mountain trail. Way too may people are sold and buy bikes based on a fantasy rather than where the bike will actually be ridden.
    That notion also heavily includes our nations obsession with pickup trucks and SUV's.
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  17. #17
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    Hard tails are cheaper and unless you need the suspension you should be fine with what you bought.

  18. #18
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    yeah.Sounds like a rigid fixie with a carbon fork might suit you better.

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