Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: flipsidem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    63

    New question here. Going rigid with a Surly 1 X 1

    I am trying to get a light rigid bike together for a hill climb race and I have decided that my Jamis Dakota ('03 or '04, I am not sure) is going to be the frame. I picked up a Surly 1 x 1 fork off craigslist today. Now that I have taken the time to really measure things, I have found that the Surly 1 x 1 is going to be about 30mm shorter than the Manitou Skareb Comp that I am replacing. The Surly 1 x 1 is 413mm crown to axel. The Manitou Skareb Comp is about 445mm crown to axel without my weight on it. It seems to compress a little with me on it. What I am wondering is if I am really going to notice the effect of the decreased fork length. Is that amount of difference going to be very noticable? Should I proceed with the fork I have, or should I get a longer one? Any thoughts or suggestions are appreciated.

  2. #2
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,024
    So are you asking if you will feel a difference between the A-C measurement from a rigid fork compared to your Manitou? If that is the case, I doubt it. The geometry of the 1x1 is based around that rigid fork or forks of similar A-C measurements so you can expect that the geometry is predictable and well matched to the rigid fork. You will notice the lack of suspension ten times more than you will notice the difference in A-C height. Only way to know is to test ride!
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: flipsidem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    63
    Thanks for the comments. Just be clear, the frame is a Jamis Dakota, and the fork is a Surly 1x1. The thing I am wondering about is if the bike is going to feel all twitchy when I switch to the Surly 1x1 fork with the short A2C length. I think you are right when you say that I just need to switch it up and ride it to see what it is like.

  4. #4
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,024
    Quote Originally Posted by flipsidem
    Thanks for the comments. Just be clear, the frame is a Jamis Dakota, and the fork is a Surly 1x1.
    I'm sorry, I guess I didn't read closely enough; homebrew will do that to ya.

    Yes, the bike may feel twitchy but you're the only one who can decide if that's good or bad. It really depends on how you feel on the bike and the trails you are riding. I would probably suggest getting a suspension corrected fork for the same travel as your Jamis if you were going to preserve the handling of the bike. Dimension makes forks, they're not the best but they might be another option that won't break the bank. I'm running a dimension cross fork on one of my bikes and it's a heavy but solid piece.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  5. #5
    dirtbag
    Reputation: ranier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,445
    I notice the quicker steering when I switched from an old Manitou to the same 1x1 fork on my commuter.

    Also had a similar experience with a rigid carbon fork off ebay on a mtb designed for an 80mm fork. I bought one that was advertised as 80mm suspension corrected with a 445mm a2c. It slackened the head angle and slowed steering. I replaced it with a 425mm version and I like the handling much better.

    Try the fork, you may or may not like the handling change. If you want to keep the same geo as the suspension fork, Surly makes a longer 1x1 fork that's easy on the wallet and as zebrahum says, there are other alternatives for a longer a2c fork.
    Amolan

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: flipsidem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    63

    Salsa

    Just as a follow up. I actually ended up going with a Salsa Cromoto 445 A2C. I like how it feels, and it was the best combination of light weight & low cost that I could find. It looks pretty good too. Commuting on a light mountain bike is just better than anything else IMO.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •