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  1. #1
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    Frame and wheels alignment - something strange is going on and i can't pin it!

    I've mentioned previously on a dedicated thread on the Giant sub-forum that I had the impression my bike wasn't tracking properly.

    Since it's a FS Anthem X I thought it could have anything to do with the rear triangle assembly but the guys that replied said there was nothing to align on rear triangles when they get assembled. I then checked the wheels properly and they aren't dished towards one side and they are true, so on that department nothing is wrong.

    Looking at the frame they also are centered.

    However the funny thing is that when pedaling I keep having the impression that the rear wheel/rear part of the bicycle is slightly pulling towards the right. Plus, looking at my front wheel from above it looks like it isn't centered but slightly turned towards the left. A bit like on the picture, not as exaggerated though!



    If I try to center the wheel to the frame while pedaling the bike will skew slowly but definitely towards the right side.

    These wheels were once assembled on my old XtC and after properly checking that every alignment was correct I just got used to the fact that my tires got more used towards one of the sides, the rubber wasn't being worn right on the center. Maybe my body just didn't sit symmetrically on the bike causing it to lean more to one side.

    With the Anthem, the same wheels and same type of tires, are getting worn exactly on the center.

    So WTH is going on here, what am I missing? Should I expect this kind of behavior from a soft tail or is anything wrong?

  2. #2
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    How is the condition of the dropouts? Do you have one of the QR springs covering the axle (big side of the spring is supposed to be toward the outside of the lever, not toward the bike). Have you asked a shop to take a look at it?
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  3. #3
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    I used to take my bike to the LBSs only for suspension maintenance. Currently I'm doing all the service myself. I can only imagine that if they f'ed up majorly to reduce a suspension travel, asking to check something so fine will be something considered along the lines of rocket science to them. So I'm alone on this one.

    Rear axle is correctly assembled! As far as I can tell, dropouts are in proper shape. Never had a crash and everything looks aligned. Even the rear wheel is definitely aligned with the rear triangle and properly centered.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BustedBearing View Post
    I used to take my bike to the LBSs only for suspension maintenance. Currently I'm doing all the service myself. I can only imagine that if they f'ed up majorly to reduce a suspension travel, asking to check something so fine will be something considered along the lines of rocket science to them. So I'm alone on this one.

    Rear axle is correctly assembled! As far as I can tell, dropouts are in proper shape. Never had a crash and everything looks aligned. Even the rear wheel is definitely aligned with the rear triangle and properly centered.
    Well let me put it this way: if there is something wrong with it, the issue appears to be in the frame. And as a frame issue, it is the dealer's responsibility to diagnose and fix it. So it doesn't matter how much maintenance you do yourself, if the fame is defective you need the dealer to say so and take action to fix it. You've exhausted the amount of things you have control over, it's time to call in the next level of help.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    Well let me put it this way: if there is something wrong with it, the issue appears to be in the frame. And as a frame issue, it is the dealer's responsibility to diagnose and fix it. So it doesn't matter how much maintenance you do yourself, if the fame is defective you need the dealer to say so and take action to fix it. You've exhausted the amount of things you have control over, it's time to call in the next level of help.
    Indeed I had yet to consider it being a permanent defect. That is a whole different point of view I hadn't considered.

    The frame still has warranty, only problem is the distance the shop where I bought it and the only other shop that supported Giant around here dropped the representation. Nevertheless I'll still have a talk with a proper mechanic I know who has worked with Giant in the past in the meanwhile.

    I made the thread cause I'm preparing stuff, getting tools and parts, to do the shock seal maintenance. While at it, since it's been almost a year the last time it was done, I'm going to pop open the bearing seals, take things apart, clean and relube.

    As I'll have the triangles taken apart that would be a good time to check for "internal" stuff but as this is my first FS I don't know what to check (apart from the bearings) if there is anything to check...

  6. #6
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    Try Sheldon Brown's string method for a quick check. It's about 3/4 down this page Bicycle Frame/Hub Spacing .
    Round and round we go

  7. #7
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    Yikes... Sounds like a tweaked frame...

  8. #8
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    The frame being tweaked, shouldn't there be some place where I could see some kind of bulge? And taking into account how fragile this powder coat like paint is, it would certainly flake. Or then, its just really such a minimal thing...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Try Sheldon Brown's string method for a quick check. It's about 3/4 down this page Bicycle Frame/Hub Spacing .
    I'd read about that and was thinking trying it as soon as I get the workstand and get my hands onto servicing the shock/frame. I've taken a look at the frame and I'm afraid that method will have some problems with this geometry. I reckon the string won't get any near of the seat tube cause of the upper rocker... But I'll try it nevertheless, I can be wrong!

  10. #10
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    An easy (less accurate) test is to wet a section of concrete and carefully walk or ride(keep the front wheel straight and ride in a straight line) the bike through the wet patch onto a dry section and observe the tire tracks for wheel tracking. On an older elevated chain stay bike I dished the rear wheel away from the front derailleur (granny gear put the chain too close to the tire) and tried this to see how far out of alignment the tires were. I could easily see the offset of the rear wheel.

    urmb
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BustedBearing View Post
    The frame being tweaked, shouldn't there be some place where I could see some kind of bulge? And taking into account how fragile this powder coat like paint is, it would certainly flake. Or then, its just really such a minimal thing...
    It won't be neccessarily out of alignment from damage that would be visable. Sometimes when the frames are constructed, there can be alignment issues. I work at a shop and build about 30 bikes a week from different manufactures. Occasionally we see mis-aligned frames right out of the box. Take it to the LBS from which you purchased it. they should have dropout and frame alignment tools to check conclusively.

  12. #12
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    My son's old (2002) Rainier HT appears to be grossly misaligned also. Bought it used several years ago and it has always had ghost-shifting issues. I only recently discovered the misalignment when installing a new bottom bracket/crank assembly.

    I found a way to fix it, however.... found a used Reign FS frame/fork/wheelset on eBay and now we're transferring the components to the new frame! Hope it's straight!

    AM.

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