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  1. #1
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    Drop bar, disc brake, triple crankset bike - suggestions

    Looking to buy or build up a in-between sort of bike. It will be my Winter road bike, Fall night-ride (on/off-road) bike, occasional commuter, and better option than my road bike (w/std double) for hilly centuries and extended hill climbing (though not a weight-weenie bike).

    Requirements:

    Disc brakes
    1:1 low gearing (triple or double w/ MTB rear)
    Drop bar w/STI shifters
    Provisions for fenders and rack
    Should take widish tires, 38c or so.

    Oh, and it must look cool also.

    I like the Salsa La Cruz but don't like the gearing on the complete. Redline Conquest Classic looks promising, but I can't find any information about it (and components are a little low budget).

    Looking for other suggestions. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Ballstein Models
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    Salsa Fargo.
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  3. #3
    Former Bike Wrench
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    Quote Originally Posted by hogprint
    Salsa Fargo.
    +1

    http://www.salsacycles.com/fargoComp09.html

  4. #4
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    The Kona Sutra is worth a look. It comes with bar-end shifters though, but then so does the Fargo. The 2010 Sutra comes already equipped with fenders & racks (front + rear).

  5. #5
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    Since you seem to be rather specific about what you want, you may be better off building up a frame rather than buying. Although you said it wasn't going to be a weight weenie bike, a full on steel touring setup can be quite heavy. And a typical cyclocross complete bike will not have disc brakes or a triple. I would suggest starting with a cyclocross frame (some have disc tabs and braze-ons for a light touring setup) and building it up. For example, This frame from Nashbar could be set up the way you want. That's assuming you're OK with aluminum (you didn't state frame material preference).
    I know you stated you wanted a triple for the hills, but with the gearing available today on a mountain 9-speed cassette (34t), are you sure you need one? I think you can still get 9-speed STI road shifters. Or you can dish out a ridiculous amount of money for Srams new XX 10-speed mountain cassette.
    Warning: may contain sarcasm and/or crap made up in an attempt to feel important.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailville
    Since you seem to be rather specific about what you want, you may be better off building up a frame rather than buying. Although you said it wasn't going to be a weight weenie bike, a full on steel touring setup can be quite heavy. And a typical cyclocross complete bike will not have disc brakes or a triple. I would suggest starting with a cyclocross frame (some have disc tabs and braze-ons for a light touring setup) and building it up. For example, This frame from Nashbar could be set up the way you want. That's assuming you're OK with aluminum (you didn't state frame material preference).
    I know you stated you wanted a triple for the hills, but with the gearing available today on a mountain 9-speed cassette (34t), are you sure you need one? I think you can still get 9-speed STI road shifters. Or you can dish out a ridiculous amount of money for Srams new XX 10-speed mountain cassette.
    Yeah, I would go the build-it route - I just expect it will be much more expensive. I'm definitely open to an Al frame, so what you're suggesting about a cyclocross frame makes sense.

    I'm not a real wizard when it comes to figuring out compatibility for the drivetrains. If I could make a road compact double work with an XT rear der and 9-speed I think I could be happy with that, as long as the gaps between gear combos aren't too huge.

    As for the Fargo, it looks quite good but I'm very hesitant about these bar-end shifters. It just seems like a couple steps backward . . .

    Thanks to everybody for their suggestions.

  7. #7
    PCC
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    The problem that I see with what you are trying to do is that you want to run 9-speed in this day and age of 10-speed STI shifters. You either need to find NOS 9-speed STI shifters or find used, but in good shape, ones. An alternative is to use Campy 10-speed shifters with a Shimano rear derailleur and use the "Hubbub" mounting technique for anchoring the cable at the rear derailleur. The good thing about this is that the Campy left shifter can shift any front derailleur for either two or three chainrings without any issues. Unlike Shimano left STI shifters, which have four clicks for the front derailleur (low trim, middle, middle trim, high) Campy left shifters have something like 18 little clicks and you can shift up five or six clicks per swing of the lever. This is true as long as you stay away from the Escape mechanism shifters. Escape mechanism shifters only allow one shift up or down on the right lever and are more like Shimano STI on the left shifter. Their normal shifter mechanism can shift up or down four or five gears with one swing of either lever.

    Also keep in mind that road and mountain front derailleurs have different actuation ratios so you will need to figure out how to get this to work as well.

    An alternative would be to go with bar-end shifters or with the SRAM XX 10-speed cassette with 10-speed shifters.

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