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  1. #1
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    To build my current bike... or buy a new one..that is the dilemma

    ok so heres the story, i have a 2013 specialized rockhopper comp. its served its purpose and im looking to upgrade it. this is what i want to get for it at this moment.

    Rockshox Sid RLT
    E13 XCX crankset, bottom bracket, chain ring and chain guide for 1x9 conversion
    ZTR Crest wheelset with new tires and tubeless

    as well as a few odds and ends.. .grips, stem, new headset, and skewers.

    My plan was to upgrade this bike in stages.. 4 of them to be precise. and later on swap to a carbon frame.

    Lately tho, ive been thinking if i'd be better off on a full suspension bike. and ran into the santa cruz super light. so the question is...

    do i get all sorts of badass components for my bike little by little. .or spend the same money to get a new super light and ride that out for a while?

  2. #2
    CS2
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    Quote Originally Posted by vegan_warrior View Post
    so the question is...

    do i get all sorts of badass components for my bike little by little. .or spend the same money to get a new super light and ride that out for a while?
    Get the new bike.
    1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1992 Stumpjumpers. 1995 Waterford 1200, 1999 Waterford RSE, plus a garage full of steel frames.

  3. #3
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    The frame is your foundation, the main source of weight and fit. The Rockhopper is a respectable frame in terms of its geometry and the bike, as is, gets you going nicely. It is pretty heavy, however.

    Piecemeal component improvements make only slight improvements; some you will barely notice. Well tuned, even modest components work very well. Substantial upgrades in wheelsets and crank can take a lot of weight off and you will feel that in many ways. Those are the most expensive, though.

    I'd go with a new bike, with due respect to your current steed.
    I don't rattle.

  4. #4
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    Get the new bike. If you feel like you need full suspension now, you still will after you spend over $1000 on parts for a hardtail. Are all your components you need transferable to the Superlight? Also, you probably won't be able to afford to put as much cool stuff on your bike as Specialized or Santa Cruz can. FYI: I put skinnies on my '07 Rockhopper and I use it for a road bike. My 2012 FSR Stumpy EVO is my main ride.

  5. #5
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    Re: To build my current bike... or buy a new one..that is the dilemma

    i got bit further and changed few bits on my trek ht...then i got Nice deal on second hand zesty 314 frame and fox fork, pulled the trigger and build a bike on it moving as much as i could from my trek. Last week had first ride and was brill. i wish i had done it before spending money on ht

    Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 2

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the input guys, I was originally looking at the 26er superlight. But building mine was looking better because I'd be able to go tubeless and 1x9 and have a sick fork. I decided to look at the superlight 29 and it comes tubeless ready and has very nice components for the money, so I'm pretty sure ill be getting a superlight 29er rxc build. Ill be plenty happy with that one for a while, just adding a 1x10 conversion to it and calling it a day.

  7. #7
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    The 'need' to upgrade never ends. Be warned.

    The question is do you want to do the upgrades. By that I mean do you want to learn to be your own mechanic? If you want to learn things, go with the upgrades. Most will transfer over and what doesn't can go to ebay. And paying as you go will allow you to get better stuff over time. If you just want a nicer bike buy the new one.

    Bike mechanics is as important to my biking experience as actually riding, almost.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmm...bicycles View Post
    The 'need' to upgrade never ends. Be warned.

    The question is do you want to do the upgrades. By that I mean do you want to learn to be your own mechanic? If you want to learn things, go with the upgrades. Most will transfer over and what doesn't can go to ebay. And paying as you go will allow you to get better stuff over time. If you just want a nicer bike buy the new one.

    Bike mechanics is as important to my biking experience as actually riding, almost.
    Yeah definately looking to learn bike mechanics. As it is I tune up my bike myself so it comes easy. Upgrading also seems attractive because I get the exact components I want. Something I won't find in a complete bike. The full suspension idea came to me because I'm told I'd be faster on a full squish. But I'm not entirely convinced I actually need it, considering I ride in south Florida. Only real benefit I've thought about is the additional comfort. Would serve a purpose for the more rooty/rocky parks. And the fact that I can take the faster rougher lines easier.

  9. #9
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    I would ask what your intended riding goals are. I really can't imagine S FL being an area where you need a FS 29-er....unless you are doing some serious epic rides lasting 4+hrs.

    I live in the Pacific Northwest where we ride WET root, rocks, with lots of elevation changes. I ride a 26" long travel steel hardtail (from UK...where they have similar terrain) I used to ride a 26" FS bike. But felt something was missing. I like dancing with my bike and honing my skills. On much longer rides or during the times I'm out of shape and I'm trying to keep up with a fast group, I sometimes wish I had my old FS bike back. But that's when I'm feeling lazy and just want to sit and pedal. I have two road bikes for that.

    If you want to change things around, I'd look at a good quality steel hardtail to build up with nice parts. 26" or 29-er if you want a little more comfort.
    Just get out and ride!

  10. #10
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    I ride in Florida, I ride a steel hardtail. Only one guy I ride with has a full suspension and that's due to a bad back. How tall are you? My experience with 29ers has been tall guys love them, short guys hate them and everybody in the middle needs to test ride them before they decide.

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