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  1. #1
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    Build around old frame or get a new one?

    Hi, guys, I recently acquired an older model 1998 Gary Fisher Tassajara bike, non suspension. It was cheap, and the condition is pretty good, especially the frame. Light, sturdy, but hard tailed.

    Is it a good idea to buy new forks to build around this frame or should I aim for a newer full suspension build. I like to bike on non flat terrain. The frame is immaculate and fits my size nicely though. And it looks and feels so well built, is it worth it to let it go or play around with it?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mitzikatzi's Avatar
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    It will be difficult to find "modern" forks with short enough travel to suit the frame. Some forks can be modified to have shorter travel.

    Buy a new bike or frame/fork combo and go from there.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  3. #3
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    is there a way for me to measure how much distance my frame will allow for shock travel? Do i measure from the axle cutout up to the diagonal beam that goes down to the bottom bracket?

  4. #4
    InsaneObiker...dasss mee!
    Reputation: FroggyBiker's Avatar
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    frames are designed to handel only a specific travel soo ... if you have an older frame and want a new fork fid the fork you like and go hit your shops shok parts bin and find some nylon shims to limit the travel..... if you dont want it to THUD when it bottoms out put a thin rubber bumper in the top and bottom of the new shims .... OR get some old Judy TT limiters and drill em out to your slider size... they were all rubber !!!!! its really not hard, most folks make out that forks are hard to work on HorseHocky! there a piece of cake.... I have done hundreds, beleive me you can do it yourself

  5. #5
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    Check the original equipment on bikepedia. Get the axle to crown measurement of the original fork. Find a modern fork with the same measurement or within 10mm +/-. Travel means nothing, axle to crown is all that matters

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