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  1. #1
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    Any luck painting anodised bike components?

    I have a 2011 Giant Reign X0, while I love the bike, I am not a fan of the Gold anodised linkages - they don't sit well with my conservative mid 40's image, a bit more bling than I can handle
    Personally I think natural alloy or flat black would look better

    If I was to pull them off, give them a good going over with fine sandpaper then etch prime and spray with good quality aerosol can auto colour does any one know if it would last over the anodising?
    I am pretty good with my hands [I am a tradesman] so it would be as good a job as possible without trade/spray shop skills
    Last edited by jeffgre_6163; 10-30-2011 at 07:29 PM.

  2. #2
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    Never did it, but....

    ... a quick Google search and you'll see it can be done.

    How to Paint Over Anodized Aluminum | eHow.com

    Personally, I say leave it be and ride it, but I also am very particulat about color, so I can relate. Let us know how you make out.
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  3. #3
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    I've read that certain solvents eat the color off of anodized parts. You don't want to beat up the surface finish too much because surface condition is a critical component of fatigue life.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  4. #4
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    Oven cleaner removes anodizing, once used it to convert some purple components to polished.

  5. #5
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    Anodize is the perfect base for a paint job. There is no need
    to remove it or sand it. Just clean it with a solvent of some kind,
    prime, then paint it the color you want.

    Best, John

  6. #6
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    Painting aluminum, or anodized aluminum can be tricky. At the minimum you should use self etching primer.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl View Post
    Anodize is the perfect base for a paint job. There is no need
    to remove it or sand it. Just clean it with a solvent of some kind,
    prime, then paint it the color you want.

    Best, John
    Quote Originally Posted by ljsmith View Post
    Painting aluminum, or anodized aluminum can be tricky. At the minimum you should use self etching primer.
    Hmmm...
    Conflicting information.
    More research on my part is required I think

  8. #8
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    Maybe this will help. I anodized and painted parts for
    Navy aircraft for over 35 years and this is what we did.

    Best, John

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl View Post
    Maybe this will help. I anodized and painted parts for
    Navy aircraft for over 35 years and this is what we did.

    Best, John
    John
    Am I missing something? did you forget a link?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl View Post
    Maybe this will help. I anodized and painted parts for
    Navy aircraft for over 35 years and this is what we did.

    Best, John
    John
    Am I missing something? did you forget a link?

  11. #11
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    well if you can spend like $20, i would say use a de-ano from the hardware store... then just bring it to your local ano shop, and they should charge roughly $20 per link..

    unless you dont mind painting over and getting scratches

  12. #12
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    Sorry jeffgre_6163, but sometimes I don't explain myself very well. What I
    was trying to say is in the aircraft industry the way we would finish a aluminum
    part is first anodize or alodine it, then prime, and last color. We never painted
    bare aluminum. It is not easy to get paint to stick on bare aluminum. Also
    getting the part reanodized is another choice like Mattlikestobike said, but
    they will strip the old anodize as part of the process to reanodize it. How
    ever you need to be carefull when getting a part reanodized because every
    time you remove the old anodize you will remove some base metal. If the
    whole process isn't done right you can end up with oversized holes for things
    like the pivot bearings. So make sure you have a good shop do the work.

    Best, John

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl View Post
    Sorry jeffgre_6163, but sometimes I don't explain myself very well. What I
    was trying to say is in the aircraft industry the way we would finish a aluminum
    part is first anodize or alodine it, then prime, and last color. We never painted
    bare aluminum. It is not easy to get paint to stick on bare aluminum. Also
    getting the part reanodized is another choice like Mattlikestobike said, but
    they will strip the old anodize as part of the process to reanodize it. How
    ever you need to be carefull when getting a part reanodized because every
    time you remove the old anodize you will remove some base metal. If the
    whole process isn't done right you can end up with oversized holes for things
    like the pivot bearings. So make sure you have a good shop do the work.

    Best, John
    Cheers
    thanks for the clarification

  14. #14
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    New question here. What if the part is small, delicate and non-removable?

    Hey all, sorry to dig up an old post but I have a related problem that's got me in a dilemma.

    I have had success in the past using a procedure of removing anodizing using oven cleaner (from those blingy Crankbrothers seatpost saddle rail clamps!) and this is all well and good and fairly straightforward to do if you can completely remove and disassemble the parts to be recoloured.

    BUT, what are we to do if the parts cannot be removed, are small and/or fiddly to reach, and/or allowing any harsh chemicals to move outside the part to be recoloured would cause damage?

    I am in this situation with two parts that give me the creeps, and these are the rebound dials on both my front suspension (Cannondale Lefty XLR) and my rear shock (RockShox Monarch RT3 Relay). \begin{rant} BRIGHT RED. I HATE IT! Seriously bike industry, leave the whole bright red thing alone, I don't have any red on my bike! \end{rant}

    I was told by my Lefty specialist that for my particular model (Lefty 1.0, MY2015) the rebound dial cannot be removed easily by a home mechanic and is a lot of work. Furthermore I recently took off my Monarch Relay from the frame and whilst I got better access to the rebound dial, I couldn't figure out an easy way of removing it without disassembling the entire shock.

    Thus I think we can take it for granted that these dials cannot be removed from their locations without serious work (though, I'm happy to be corrected, if anyone can provide me with a guide!), they are small and have fiddly areas to access (in terms of painting) and if some harsh chemical were to spill or seep into surrounding areas, it could cause trouble.

    I'll attach a couple of pictures below:

    Lefty XLR

    Monarch Relay

    Whatever 'treatment' were to be applied to the dials, we would certainly like the colour to be somewhat resilient to handling (turning with our fingers) and the weather (water and dirt), so simply using a 'Sharpie' (permanent marker) is probably out of the equation since it won't really last that long and will probably have purple hues.

    Anyone have any suggestions? My first preference would be BLACK, so what about simply painting them on top of their anodizing with some special black paint with a tiny paint brush or cotton tip, would that work? If so, what kind of paint would I need to use? I have heard that anodized aluminium is an excellent surface to paint on top of, but I suspect that these dials have some sort of clear coat over the top of the anodizing, so would I have to remove the clear coat with a solvent and cotton tip, or just sand it a tiny bit lightly? Folks from the USA seem to have varying success with using a 'paint pen' like this for the aluminium parts on firearms: https://www.birchwoodcasey.com/Clean...ch-Up-Pen.aspx

    My second preference would be to just remove the anodizing and get a dull grey from the natural oxidation of the aluminium after which I can just apply a clear coat to seal it (I ended up doing this go get a weathered gun-metal grey look on my Crankbrothers clamps so it looks alright). I could probably very very gently rub oven cleaner with a cotton bud and persist until the red all comes off, but then I'd be left with this bare aluminium and wouldn't have a means to seal the surface as the clear coat could seep into surrounding crevices and cause trouble!

    Obviously 'leave it' is the best advice and simplest solution, but can anyone offer some advice as to how I could remove these red bling bits in a fairly safe and easy way?

    Thanks guys!
    CURRENT BIKE

    Lapierre XR 529 e:i (2014) White/Black

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