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  1. #1
    I-S
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    2009 Da Bomb Cherry Bomb build

    I have just finished building up my new 2009 Da Bomb Cherry Bomb frame:



    The build uses all my old parts where possible, taken from another frame. Full build list:

    Frame: 2009 17" Da Bomb Cherry Bomb
    Rear shock: 2009 190mm Manitou Radium R
    Forks: 2008 Magura Menja MM130
    Front brake: 2004 Magura Louise FR 180 with HEL braided hose
    Rear brake: 2004 Magura Louise 160 with HEL braided hose
    Front wheel: Magura Gustav 36h hub, 36 DT competition spokes, Mavic 717
    Rear wheel: Hope XC 36h hub, 36 DT competition spokes, Mavic 717
    Tyres and tubes: Panaracer Fire XC 2.1, Maxxis ultralight
    Mechs: SRAM X9
    Shifters: SRAM XO twist
    Cables: Goodridge white
    Chain: SRAM PC991
    Cassette: Shimano XT M760
    Crankset: Ritchey Mountain Pro 2 ISIS
    BB: FSA Platinum ISIS
    Pedals: Wellgo MG1
    Headset: Cane Creek S3
    Stem: Hope XC 90x10
    Bar: Titec Hellbent Flat tracker 7075
    Grips: Lizard Skins Moab dual compound
    Bar ends: Ritchey WCS
    Seatpost: Da Bomb Hellfire XC
    Seat: WTB Rocket V






    Ride report to follow...

    First impressions of the frame are slightly mixed. The build quality is excellent, although it is rather heavy. It is not designed to be a lightweight XC frame, tipping the scales at 3520g inc rear shock. What is not excellent is the quality of the paintwork - it's quite soft, and flakes away when a bolt is tightened up against it (eg rear caliper bolt). I found (and not for the first time) that I needed to take a file to clear up the paint under the caliper bolt head (so that the bolt sits flatter against the frame). I'm not a huge fan of the white paint either, but I couldn't get a black one (well, I COULD... for another 50% of the price I paid).

  2. #2
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    good looking bike. the frame has some interesting looking tid bits on it

  3. #3
    I-S
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    Just back in from christening it. Forgive the crappy mobile phone pics, but I don't have a decent cam that I can sensibly take riding...





    Rides very nicely - vice free. The front wheel seems a long way away compared to my previous frame, but that was unusually short.

  4. #4
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    pretty bike! have fun with it.

  5. #5
    I-S
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    So, have a couple of rides out on it now...

    First off... a little about the frame. There's very little information around the web about it, so I thought I'd put this up in a reasonably visible place so that anyone else considering buying one.

    Basic spec... 100mm rear travel, 3.55kg (frame inc 190mm manitou Radium R rear shock)... not sure what else there would be to say about a frame's specs. 68mm bottom bracket, 1.125" conventional headset, etc. The biggest news (and the thing that got me interested in it) is that it's a genuine Horst-link design.

    This frame is described as a "slope style" frame, and apparently aimed at 4X, slalom, etc also. However, as is fairly obvious, I've built mine up as a trail bike. My riding consists of riding around the Peak District (where I live) and welsh trail centres, typical rides of 6-30 miles.

    My previous frame was too short and the head angle too steep, so it was rather unstable at speed (it would go into (possibly pilot-induced) wobbles at about 30+mph, and not confidence inspiring in tight turns.

    This however does not suffer those flaws. It is very stable and feels just right with a 5in fork and 90mm x 10deg stem. This is the first bike I've had with a platform shock (third FS frame, second horst-link frame). I don't know if the Radium has been custom-valved for the frame, but it works brilliantly well, with no pedal bob noticeable. My previous horst-link was rather bobby, and I had to rely on lockout a great deal (and would generally forget now and then to disable it before the next down)...

    The rear triangle is extremely solidly built - my previous chain stay protector wouldn't fit. There's a very serious bit of metalwork as the bridge at the frame end of the chainstays. Each pivot is sealed cartridge bearings (standard sizes). The result of this level of metalwork and the platform shock is a 4" travel frame that feels a lot like a hardtail to pedal up a hill, but over the bumps is nicely active and lands nicely out of jumps. It doesn't flex or track strangely (my first FS had a bit of flex in the back end, it was a single pivot).

    Negatives.... The paint finish is quite thick gloss paint which seems rather soft - the bolt heads for the rear caliper made significant imprints in it, and I had to scrape the paint away to make the bolts sit flat (I've had a problem with this before, where the bolts aren't sitting quite right). The caliper side of the frame is fine, machined flat and not painted over. Another negative is weight. Of course, the weight is fine for what the bike is intended for, but a trail bike could be a little lighter - my previous was 300g lighter. The final one is the headtube - it is long, and takes a conventional headset. It requires quite a long steerer tube on the forks - a semi-integrated headset would have been better.

    I am very pleased with it, and the built weight as the bike is show is about 13.5kg (29.2 lb). It would be nice to get it a bit lighter, but it's not at all bad.

    Today's ride pics. The wonderful thing about riding in the peak district is the views...




  6. #6
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    Nice write up. I considered a Da Bomb but was unsure of the brand as they seem quite unknown.

    What was your previous frames?

  7. #7
    I-S
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    Previous FS frames:

    BeOne Nirvana 1.0:


    Marin East Peak:

  8. #8
    No good in rock gardens..
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    You don't see many Da Bomb bikes around. Looks good.
    My Cannondale Lefty keeps failing....

  9. #9
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    I like its looks. I came very close to getting some Da Bomb Wheels, but they were super heavy.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  10. #10
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    hey man where did you buy the Super Nova White one? Chain Reaction Cycles only has the black one for 700 pounds.

    Cheers

  11. #11
    I-S
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    I got it from Bikespec in the channel islands, on ebay. They still have one in 15", white. Funny really, as I wanted a black one...

    CRC have the 2010 model (which I can't see any differences with) in white at the same price as the 2009.

  12. #12
    I-S
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    Update.

    Well, I've had some time on this bike now, although nothing like as much as I SHOULD have, for the amount of time I've had it.

    1) Weight. Really doesn't bother me anymore. It's lighter than my mate's On-one 456 hardtail with a broadly comparable build (He must have hidden lead weights in his... I can't figure it out).

    2) Ride. With a little tweaking of saddle position and bar angle and a reduction in shock pressure combined with the bushings and seals etc all running in, this bike has come alive. It's beautifully balanced front to back, and allows you to go haring into stupid rocky sections without worry. The low leverage ratio combined with the shock platform continues to work wonders - I am never left wanting to lock it out even up the heftiest climbs. The lateral stiffness continues to impress - there is no appreciable difference in lateral stiffness between this and my 24Seven steel hardtail.

    3) Bottom bracket. Here we hit a problem. My old ISIS bottom bracket gave up the ghost, as they tend to do. I went through a few motions in trying to fix it up, but eventually bit the bullet and ordered an external bearing setup (a Deore - couldn't swing the extra for the SLX). This works out similar weight to my old ISIS setup so that's ok.

    Except it wasn't. The non-drive side swingarm is extremely close to the bottom bracket. At rest, the non-drive side bb cup could not thread into the frame because it came into contact with the swingarm. Ultimately, I managed to make it fit by sanding the swingarm - remove the paint and about 0.1mm of metal (structurally insignificant). At rest there's now enough room to slide a cigarette paper between the bb cup and the swingarm.

    What concerns me with this is that dirt will find its way in there when the suspension is compressed, and not only prevent full suspension extension, but also apply radial load to the bottom bracket. Time will tell I guess.

    On the upside, perhaps it was the nature of the worn-out ISIS bb or perhaps because of the extremely stiff nature of the frame, but the change to an external bb has been quite noticeable in terms of flex, or rather lack of.

    Overall, with that last bit of tuning and the bottom bracket changed, I feel better about the frame than before. No doubt there's a degree of familiarity now, but I think this one is a keeper, until those looto numbers come up...

  13. #13
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    nice

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