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  1. #1
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    1 Big Bike vs Another. Help me choose, and why.

    For 2013, I'm finally most of the way saved up for the bike(s) I've been wanting for a long ass time.

    I've narrowed it down to:

    Cannondale Claymore 1.

    Specialized Enduro Evo Expert 2013.

    Tell me which of the two you would pick, and why. Both are 180mm bomb-it huck and thrash machines. Both are about the same weight, and spec'd pretty close on components. Both offer exactly the capabilities I'm looking for, with the ability to still be ridden as a trail bike at times. (I have a Hardtail for that).

    The one thing that VERY much points me towards the C'Dale is the fact that it's not only $400 cheaper, but that it can be put into the 110mm travel mode. Out here in the desert, that'd be an awesome option to have because there's no lift access to the best "DH" style trails out here. So, I'm pedaling to the top, to enjoy bombing down to the bottom.

    Shoot me your thoughts, and why.

    The only downside I can see to the C'Dale is that people have had issues properly setting up the Fox DYAD shock. As well as that's the ONLY shock that can be installed/used on that frameset.

    My one downside that really stands out about the Enduro Evo is that it's a Limo. Like... a 16 passenger church van limo... and a lot of the trails out here have VERY tight turns, with technical rock sections (both up and down). So, the extra wheelbase over the C'Dale I think I might find aggrevating. I've owned 3 prior FSR bikes, so I'm very aware of how they pedal, perform, take hits, yadda yadda.

    Send it.

    Rigs:
    Specialized Rockhopper HT
    Trek 6500 HT
    Trek 3700 Disc HT (The son's)

  2. #2
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    95 Views and not a single input.

    I appreciate the help.
    Last edited by BigHit-Maniac; 01-04-2013 at 06:26 PM.
    Rigs:
    Specialized Rockhopper HT
    Trek 6500 HT
    Trek 3700 Disc HT (The son's)

  3. #3
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    Hardly anyone is going to have ridden both of those, what sort of input are you looking for?

  4. #4
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    The pull shock claymore is quite similar to the Ransom I had, I've never ridden the claymore but tried the Jekyll a few times. I like it. That said when you buy the C'dale you are buying into the proprietary components that comes with the frame.

    I don't know the kind of climb you are trying to do but if I'd have to get the bike that I have to climb and descend I'd go with the Mojo HD, Firebird, Nomad, or Reign X. My HD have been very good to me.

    Personally, I think it's a tough one because of the rear travel 180mm and more "fun" oriented bike. I've not seen or heard of any good climbing bike in that travel range. If you are going an inch shorter there are quite a few out there, good luck.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cerebroside View Post
    Hardly anyone is going to have ridden both of those, what sort of input are you looking for?
    I hear ya, my bad.

    I just was thinking maybe a current Enduro Evo Expert owner could chip in, since they're more alike than they are different. Know what I mean?

    Was curious about long term reliability... etc.....


    I know both are "slugs" so to speak, but which of the two climbs better? (or at least better than the other since they're both piglets. LOL)
    Rigs:
    Specialized Rockhopper HT
    Trek 6500 HT
    Trek 3700 Disc HT (The son's)

  6. #6
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    I've ridden neither, but I would guess the Claymore climbs better, if only because of the travel adjust. Try both bikes out before you ride if you can.

    The Enduro should be pretty reliable suspension-wise (coil), the travel adjust stuff on the Claymore probably less so.

    If I had to choose between the two I would go for the Enduro and tough it out on the climbs.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by cerebroside View Post
    I've ridden neither, but I would guess the Claymore climbs better, if only because of the travel adjust. Try both bikes out before you ride if you can.

    The Enduro should be pretty reliable suspension-wise (coil), the travel adjust stuff on the Claymore probably less so.

    If I had to choose between the two I would go for the Enduro and tough it out on the climbs.
    I had this thought process as well. I'm curious however of just HOW horribly that thing is going to climb. What makes it even more difficult, is just how impossible it is to demo these freakin bikes. All of the shops out here in Las Vegas don't have, and WON'T get either of them without ordering them, with a significant amount of money down. (Which I can understand from a dealer's perspective) however, how in the F*** are you supposed to like a car and buy a high dollar sports car without test driving the damn thing?

    Know what I mean?

    The closest thing that any shop has out here to a Claymore is the Jeckyll, but the models that they have in stock don't have a Fox 36 on em, just the 34 or 32.

    I guess the wheelbase is the same, etc so it'd be a close comparison... but then with the Enduro there's none AT ALL in stock around here.

    Rigs:
    Specialized Rockhopper HT
    Trek 6500 HT
    Trek 3700 Disc HT (The son's)

  8. #8
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    I took a chance and ordered an Enduro EVO in March and am very satisfied with my decision. Honestly the Enduro climbs better than any long travel all-mountain bike has a right to; it can climb anything that my 29er hardtail can climb albeit more slowly. Once you get used to shifting your weight appropriately to compensate for the long front suspension climbing becomes routine even fun depending on the terrain. I often find myself grabbing the Enduro for relaxed-paced XC rides with friends since it is such a blast on the downhills and relatively easy to pedal uphill unlike many other full suspension bikes I have ridden and owned in the past.

    My only real gripe is that the rear shock is not a standard size and can't be easily upgraded or replaced with anything currently available on the aftermarket. Hopefully this will change as the bike becomes more popular.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by azmtbkr81 View Post
    I took a chance and ordered an Enduro EVO in March and am very satisfied with my decision. Honestly the Enduro climbs better than any long travel all-mountain bike has a right to; it can climb anything that my 29er hardtail can climb albeit more slowly. Once you get used to shifting your weight appropriately to compensate for the long front suspension climbing becomes routine even fun depending on the terrain. I often find myself grabbing the Enduro for relaxed-paced XC rides with friends since it is such a blast on the downhills and relatively easy to pedal uphill unlike many other full suspension bikes I have ridden and owned in the past.

    My only real gripe is that the rear shock is not a standard size and can't be easily upgraded or replaced with anything currently available on the aftermarket. Hopefully this will change as the bike becomes more popular.
    Got any pictures of said beast wagon?
    Rigs:
    Specialized Rockhopper HT
    Trek 6500 HT
    Trek 3700 Disc HT (The son's)

  10. #10
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    Check Specialized demo tour and see if they won't be close enough to you to make the drive and throw a leg over it. They might have that bike on the trailer?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigHit-Maniac View Post
    Got any pictures of said beast wagon?
    Here you are sir:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 1 Big Bike vs Another.  Help me choose, and why.-img_0685.jpg  

    1 Big Bike vs Another.  Help me choose, and why.-img_0691.jpg  


  12. #12
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    Ok, maybe I'm in the minority here but who the hell cares how a 180mm travel bike climbs? If you're buying a 180mm bike, it's surly not because you care about getting to the top of the hill; it's because you care about having fun on the way down. That's why I'll suffer a bit pedaling my ASR7 up hills because I know how great it's going to be on the way down. Here's what I would do:

    Stop worrying about climbing and pick the bike you want to ride the most.

    The uphill differences between bikes in this class are going to be fairly minimal. Every bike is going to have their gimmick which makes it "better" than everything else, it's up to you to pick the one you'd actually like to own. If I were to have to choose a long travel trail bike that climbs I'd probably start with one of the multi link bikes like the Firebird, Nomad, or Mojo HD but then again I'd rather have a bike that shines on the down so make sure you're focused on picking the bike to do what you prefer.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    Ok, maybe I'm in the minority here but who the hell cares how a 180mm travel bike climbs?
    I do. In fact the Enduro's reputation as a competent climber is what put it ahead of all of the others when I bought it. I can attest that it does climb much better than shorter travel Santa Cruz Heckler and Jamis Dakar that I had previously. Any bike with 6+ inches of travel is going to descend reasonably well so climbing ability certainly becomes a relevant, differentiating factor. Here in Phoenix a long travel bike is ideal for many of the rough, rocky, drop-off laden trails that we ride but you also need something that isn't a total pig on the climbs since many of the trails can't be easily shuttled.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by azmtbkr81 View Post
    I do. In fact the Enduro's reputation as a competent climber is what put it ahead of all of the others when I bought it. I can attest that it does climb much better than shorter travel Santa Cruz Heckler and Jamis Dakar that I had previously. Any bike with 6+ inches of travel is going to descend reasonably well so climbing ability certainly becomes a relevant, differentiating factor. Here in Phoenix a long travel bike is ideal for many of the rough, rocky, drop-off laden trails that we ride but you also need something that isn't a total pig on the climbs since many of the trails can't be easily shuttled.

    Good input. That's exactly how riding out here in the Las Vegas area is. I also frequent SoCal, and Utah. Gooseberry Mesa, Moab, etc. Living in Vegas puts my scope of riding in some pretty rough a** terrain. There's quite a few shuttle run style trails out here, but I will admit Mammoth Mountain and Big Bear are by far the most fun. I don't want a dedicated DH bike. I recently sold mine. It was an absolute PIG.

    I want to be able to ride this, albeit not at mach 5.7, to the top. I want to be able to ride on EVERYTHING and still enjoy the climbs as much as I do with my Rockhopper hardtail. I'd like it to be simply bombproof. Know what I mean?
    Rigs:
    Specialized Rockhopper HT
    Trek 6500 HT
    Trek 3700 Disc HT (The son's)

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    Ok, maybe I'm in the minority here but who the hell cares how a 180mm travel bike climbs? ... The uphill differences between bikes in this class are going to be fairly minimal.
    You have to get to the top somehow, and if you're not shuttling then it makes sense to think about how your freeride bike pedals. I get what you mean; you shouldn't compromise downhill performance to gain climbing ability in a bike which is never going to climb that well. However I think you can have both to some extent.

    When you say 'class' I assume you mean 180mm freeride bikes; I can tell you right now that something like a TR250 is going to be different to a Blindside, which will be different to an Uzzi, etc. Things like seattube length and suspension design are going to make a huge difference.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by cerebroside View Post
    You have to get to the top somehow, and if you're not shuttling then it makes sense to think about how your freeride bike pedals. I get what you mean; you shouldn't compromise downhill performance to gain climbing ability in a bike which is never going to climb that well. However I think you can have both to some extent.

    When you say 'class' I assume you mean 180mm freeride bikes; I can tell you right now that something like a TR250 is going to be different to a Blindside, which will be different to an Uzzi, etc. Things like seattube length and suspension design are going to make a huge difference.
    Well like I said, maybe I'm in the minority. I routinely climb 1000+ vert on my simple single pivot 170mm bike with a coil shock. My point is that I don't really care how the bike climbs because I'm going to get up that hill no matter what. If I cared how the bike climbed I'd get a hardtail, instead I'm buying a bike based on the downhills which is how I assumed that anyone interested in a 7"+ bike would be. Every bike in the 7"+ trail bike category (yeah, I know the TR250 is a 7" bike, but the design purpose is far different) is going to climb pretty similarly. Of course they're going to be differences but I don't think they're great enough to stress about needing a bike that transforms into a 110mm bike for climbs.

    At some point we're all just fooling ourselves into thinking that we "need" a great climbing bike as our long travel machine. Rule #5, kittens: HTFU.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  17. #17
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    Haha, fair enough. For me the less time I spend going uphill the more time I get to spend going downhill.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by cerebroside View Post
    Haha, fair enough. For me the less time I spend going uphill the more time I get to spend going downhill.
    Unfortunately I spent a few years where I was in really good shape so I know that there isn't much I can do in buying my way out of the corner I've backed myself in to! Uphill hurts no matter what I'm riding, a more efficient bike might get me there a bit faster but it's not going to hurt less. My point really is that for a bike in this long travel category it's all about the ride, climbing is a secondary point at best.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  19. #19
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    I think any FR/DH bikes that flatten the descend, are going to introduce some kind of pain regardless of the weight and suspension design efficiency. I rode a 34# Socom quite a bit, it's an awesome bike/built but with the slack/rear bias geometry it's not exactly hill friendly. Long extended climb of any grade would pretty much PITA It just gets the job done, and that's the goal, because it beats pushing the bike uphill.

  20. #20
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    Check Specialized demo tour and see if they won't be close enough to you to make the drive and throw a leg over i

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