1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #126
    mtbr member
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  2. #127
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    I previously had this bike:

    1999 Giant Upland 19.5", stock (swapped out the pedals)

    I just traded it for this (the Giant was way to big for me):

    2001 Gary Fisher Mamba 17" Also stock (so far)... dont know if im diggin the colors... this thing may get a rattlecan sprayover in the color of my 3 year old's choosing and some ebay knockoff GF decals... well see. First thing I think is gonna be an upgrade to threadless so i can get a better fork and stem as well as flat bar with ends.

  3. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hopping_Rocks
    Nice looking Rockhopper there. How are the BB7s? My bike has BB5s. I'm not planning on upgrading my brakes anytime soon, but I would like to know what they're like.

    What do you mean by "full length rear derailleur housing"? Do you mean your cables have full length housings? I was thinking that might be one of the first upgrades I make to my bike in the spring of next year.
    Some of the guys I ride with have BB-5s, I think the only difference is the adjusting knobs on the inside and outside pads. They were easy to install and are easier to adjust than the V-s.

    Yes, I used full length housing on the rear dérailleur cable and routed it along the top tube using the brake line guides and zip ties. When the creek gets high, it is almost up to the bottom bracket and I found mud and dirt was getting into the housing they way it is routed along the down tube.

    It's good quality cable and housing, I haven't noticed any increased friction running full length. It still shifts as crisp as an alivo dérailleur will.

  4. #129
    Vita brevis
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    My first bike (still have it) is a year end closeout '04 GT I-drive 2.0 I got for $800.
    Upgrades over the years include;
    Marzocchi mx comp fork 120mm
    riser bars
    shorty stem
    SRAM x7 shifters and rear der.
    Azonic magnesium pedals
    Race Face bottom bracket
    Avid juicy 3 brakes with 7 inch front rotor
    Mavic crossride wheelset
    Specialized bg saddle
    Continental tires

    It still going strong!

    Worked at Moab too.

    It may be getting time to upgrade to something with more travel, but until I can afford to, the GT gets hammered.
    Last edited by rustus; 10-13-2008 at 07:41 PM.

  5. #130
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    Ok, with most of the attention and recommendations favoring the Forge Sawback 5xx HT, I thought I'd post some pics of my Forge Sawback 7xx, 19.5 in., FS bike since nobody else has. Hopefully this can help some people make a decision on a Forge mountain bike.

    I've read that the collective "they" do not recommend a FS bike for under $1000 b/c of the lower quality components but seeing this bike in person and reading the overwhelmingly positive reviews by other owners makes it difficult to agree with that.

    While not having as high-end components overall as the 5xx, the 7xx does have a mixture of what I and others consider quality entry-level, mid-grade and higher-end components that, along with the fully adjustable FS frame, makes it worth it especially considering that the bike can be easily upgraded with 5xx components or better if need be.

    There is no mistaking this bike for a dept. store toy. Coming from a Walmart Huffy HT that I had for a decade (recently sold), I can tell you that this bike is far above and beyond. It is absolutely beautiful out of the box, the fit and finish are great and, as many owners have said in their outstanding reviews, it's got to be the best dual-disc brake, adjustable FS bike for under $400 out there! Finally seeing the bike is person, I have to agree.

    I tried to include detailed pics to illustrate what most of you would be interested in seeing (please forgive some of the blurry photos). While the frame is definitely heavier than a full tilt comp rig, take note of the reinforced/gussetted frame in several locations particularly underneath the steer tube and in front of the crank which has to make this frame very strong. Coincidentally, before installing the front tire/rim, I was surprised by how light it was. It felt like I was barely holding anything and that's with the "entry-level" Kenda tires.

    I've gotten everything adjusted preliminarily except the drivetrain which I'll test + tune during my first ride in a few days. Thanks to the info on this forum, I realized that I should properly adjust a bike to my specific physical dimensions which I did for the first time using the GREAT bike-fitting article by Peter White of Peter White cycles. Still learning so I'm taking my time. As soon as I purchase a Presta valve adapter to fill the tires it'll be ready for it's maiden voyage. I'll keep you posted and include some action shots ASAP. Pics on my "Picturetrail" album below. Enjoy.








    Visit My Photos - 12 Pics



    My Album







    Last edited by Sabrason; 10-14-2008 at 10:56 PM.

  6. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabrason

    I've read that the collective "they" do not recommend a FS bike for under $1000 b/c of the lower quality components but seeing this bike in person and reading the overwhelmingly positive reviews by other owners makes it difficult to agree with that.
    I will include myself in your discription of they, since I dool out that same advise to as manny as possible. You seem to have the reasoning a bit off. I will take the liberty and speak for "they" and see if I can help you better understand. DISCLAIMER "They" may not all agree with me but most will.

    1st reason newby should not get a entry leval FS.
    Newby does not know what style of riding they like; XC, AM, DS, FR, DH, and also don't know what type of rider they are. (stand and Hammer or sit&spin) This will affect what FS design is best for you.

    2nd reason newby should not get a entry leval FS.
    Entry level bikes do not only have a lower leval componant group, but will often also have lower leval shocks front and rear, frame pivots, and hardware. Not all bikes are created equal. When we ("they") hear newby say I want FS and only have 500 to spend we cringe thinking of the feelings that we had as young riders and all the mistakes made, and wish we could reach back in time and slap the purple ano out of our hands.

    3rd reason newby should not buy entry leval FS.
    Skills. skills will compound faster on a bike with less technology designed to enhance a developed skill set. The worst thing for the sport is to get new riders on the trail, who hate there bike because it will not perform the way they expect it to, there for they stop riding or just grow to resent it.

    Finally your overwhelming reviews are mostly done by newby to FS; so you are getting reviews by riders that are affected by the reasons stated above.

    Disclaimer: If you were lucky enough to hit the magic button and none of these things affected you and your first FS bike then consider yourself lucky, don't waist your time telling me about it, because it will not change my mind. I am simply trying to explain what goes through the head of "they" when we hear I am new to this and want FS. Thanks for your time. Mark
    You Can't Triple Stamp A Double Stamp!

  7. #132
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    Thanks for the input. Allow me to first say that I'm not a "newbie" to mountain biking in terms of riding as I have been riding one for the last 10 years albeit until recently, a Walmart, steel Huffy HT as I mentioned previously.

    I think your reasons for suggesting that newbies not get an entry level FS bike are legitimate ones and make sense primarily for those few riders who are looking to become very serious about the sport. That being said, I don't think that the vast majority of amateur, weekend-warrior riders new or old (even some who want to get serious about it) need to put that kind of time and energy into scrutinizing every minor detail like fork, shock and frame type and manufacturer in an effort to determine which bike is best for them.

    Why? Because MOST people are use to buying generic bikes from dept. stores and being happy with them for years without knowing a fraction if any of the technical info that's peppered throughout these forums. That's what I and millions like me did growing up and to make a decision on any bike with even slightly more information than what most usually go into a bike purchase with will put them ahead of the game no matter what.

    They had very little if any of that technical knowledge at their disposal when they bought those bikes yet they loved them just the same and didn't end up so unhappy with them that they stopped riding or resented the bike or sport all together as you suggested. It's a BIKE, not a house or a car.

    Therefore, to say that's much more likely to happen with an entry-level FS bike than it is with a higher-end comp. bike is a bit dramatic. Put MOST people on both and they probably couldn't tell the difference at least not enough to convince them that they must have a $1,000+ FS bike.



    Entry-level bikes obviously have lower-end components and hardware. However, I question how significant that really is to MOST riders who don't get caught up in the parts/name dropping of higher end components and bikes most of which is hype. Something that's not easy to do if we listen to the collective "they."

    I think that unless you're a professional rider who's living depends on it, what bike, fork or shock your mountain bike has doesn't make that much of a difference and changing or upgrading those parts for the sake of doing so is pointless. Should a rider find that their riding style exceeds the limitations of a bike and/or they find that they are consistently breaking parts on a regular basis while riding, then and only then does an upgrade in parts or a new, better bike make sense.

    For that reason it makes more sense to me to start out with an entry-level rig that you can either use "as is" for life, upgrade at some point or replace with something better in the future if your usage demands it. This as opposed to throwing $1000+ at a higher end bike that may be no better in terms of your particular usage and riding style. Call me crazy.


    Finally your overwhelming reviews are mostly done by newby to FS; so you are getting reviews by riders that are affected by the reasons stated above.

    I take the biggest issue with this comment as you couldn't possibly know who's buying entry-level FS bikes. There can be an infinite # of reasons but you can not assume that they are ALL newbies. I'm not, could've afforded a $1,000 bike if I chose to and none of the reviews I read mentioned that they were new riders either. In fact, one impressed owner even said that the Sawback 7xx was "almost as good as my $2000 bike!!" That's his own words from a guy who probably knows his way around higher-end mt bikes. If he already owns a $2,000 rig then he's not likely to be a newbie.

    Disclaimer: If you were lucky enough to hit the magic button and none of these things affected you and your first FS bike then consider yourself lucky, don't waist your time telling me about it, because it will not change my mind. I am simply trying to explain what goes through the head of "they" when we hear I am new to this and want FS. Thanks for your time. Mark[/QUOTE]

    And I'm simply trying to explain what goes through the head of a lot of honest, intelligent and realistic people who aren't so quick to get caught up in the hype of forums like this where the collective "they" recommend a $1000+ FS bike or no FS anything.

    While I certainly respect the knowledge of experienced riders primarily when it comes to riding, trails and general advice, I also know where to draw the line.

    As with all hobbies and interests, those most involved with them tend to sometimes get caught up in the minutia of minor details that, in reality, make little difference and are less important to the vast majority of everyone else out there who are "average joes."

    Now, while you could ultimately be correct in stating that I might not be happy with my $400 FS bike b/c the components or frame aren't top-notch, the chance of that being the only reason for my unhappiness (if I'm unhappy at all) is very slim. Extremely slim! Most people will have other, more general reasons for being unhappy about it that might be easily remedied without plunking down thousands for a full-tilt comp rig.

    Regardless, to suggest to EVERYONE shopping for a FS bike for the first time that they will probably not be happy with and therefore shouldn't purchase one that is less than $1000 is simply absurd because everyone's cycling wants and needs are different. Common sense tells me that MOST riders would be very happy with a FS bike costing less than a $1000 as long as it functioned properly and fulfilled their needs unless they had a very specific idea of what they wanted and what they were looking for beforehand. Just my opinion.

    Quote from "Mountain Biking 101" on this very forum:
    3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.


    Take care,

    Mike
    Last edited by Sabrason; 10-15-2008 at 01:26 PM.

  8. #133
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    I told you not to respond, I was simply trying to give you a glimpse into the mind of someone looking into giving advise on a public forum and not knowing what is on the other side on the monitor. You have obviously put alot of effort into your responce and I applaud you for it, but you did not get the gist of what I was saying. What was tring to convey is how we "them" come to give advise. Thank you for your well thought out responce, but it was a waste of time, and you got all in an uproar for nothing, for those of up who are "them" will continue to give our same advise, and now I will get back to drinking Beer. Which by the way is the real reason to ride.
    You Can't Triple Stamp A Double Stamp!

  9. #134
    Big Gulps, Alright!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabrason
    take the biggest issue with this comment as you couldn't possibly know who's buying entry-level FS bikes. There can be an infinite # of reasons but you can not assume that they are ALL newbies. I'm not, could've afforded a $1,000 bike if I chose to and none of the reviews I read mentioned that they were new riders either. In fact, one impressed owner even said that the Sawback 7xx was "almost as good as my $2000 bike!!" That's his own words from a guy who probably knows his way around higher-end mt bikes. If he already owns a $2,000 rig then he's not likely to be a newbie.
    Nonsense. No one riding a FS bike that costs 2 grand will think your Sawback is better than their bike. A lot of component advertising is hype, yes. The average rider might not notice the difference between XT and XTR. But they (and you) WILL notice the difference between Shimano ST-EF50 shifters and Shimano Deore shifters. The components on the 7xx are very low-end. What you will find is that the shifters will constantly be of of adjustment and they won't shift cleanly. The Deore shifters of the 5xx would be much better. The fork on the 7xx is poor. A buddy of mine had the Manitou Axel and it randomly decided to iniate lock-out whenever it felt like it. Dangerous. The 5xx's Dart 1 on the other hand is much more reliable.

    You'd have been better off with a $300 bike shop hardtail - I think that before long you'll notice that things start breaking and you won't want to ride anymore. Additionally, it's worth noting that the drivetrain is 7-speed, so if you do decide to upgrade components, you'll pretty much have to do the whole thing at once. Most bike shops don't stock a lot of 7-speed stuff, to my knowledge.
    Last edited by Berkley; 10-15-2008 at 03:51 PM.

  10. #135
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    I stumbled on the giant Forge thread here right after dusting off my $40 thrift store Haro V2 and deciding that I did in fact miss riding bikes.

    Upgrades so far are the cheap Panaracer Fire XC tires, RaceFace Evolve XC seatpost, an ancient pair of Time Atac Alium pedals I had lying around and a RaceFace Evolve XC stem added after the picture was taken.
    Besides shortening the cables and housing for the lower stem, I think I'm happy with the setup.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #136
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    Bought this frame, cuz it was beefy and light, and started building it up. The frame is a no name brand, but the parts are a good start.

    Avid BB7 discs, s, some free ride wheels (since im a big boy), Origin 8 carbon bar, FSA stem and seat, LX components, with deore shifters, all 8 speed. Dart 2 shock, ordering either a Zoche, Reba, or a SID in the next few weeks.

    Ordered my egg beaters, origin 8 carbon post, and all my XT components.








  12. #137
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    that Access frame is made for and sold by performance bikes. They are sweet. I had 1 I got on clearance and rode for a while. Sold it to a buddy for $80 in new condition with some extra parts.
    If my memory serves me correctly, that frame weighs 2.8 lbs. Nice ride.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  13. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley
    Nonsense. No one riding a FS bike that costs 2 grand will think your Sawback is better than their bike. A lot of component advertising is hype, yes. The average rider might not notice the difference between XT and XTR. But they (and you) WILL notice the difference between Shimano ST-EF50 shifters and Shimano Deore shifters. The components on the 7xx are very low-end. What you will find is that the shifters will constantly be of of adjustment and they won't shift cleanly. The Deore shifters of the 5xx would be much better. The fork on the 7xx is poor. A buddy of mine had the Manitou Axel and it randomly decided to iniate lock-out whenever it felt like it. Dangerous. The 5xx's Dart 1 on the other hand is much more reliable.

    You'd have been better off with a $300 bike shop hardtail - I think that before long you'll notice that things start breaking and you won't want to ride anymore. Additionally, it's worth noting that the drivetrain is 7-speed, so if you do decide to upgrade components, you'll pretty much have to do the whole thing at once. Most bike shops don't stock a lot of 7-speed stuff, to my knowledge.


    Hi there,

    Thanks for the response but you didn't read my comments carefully. The impressed 7xx reviewer said that he thought that the Sawback 7xx was ALMOST as good as his $2,000 bike. Not better than, but almost as good as --- implying that the 7xx is in fact a very good bike and very close in craftmanship and quality to what I assume from the price tag must be his high-end comp bike. Unless he's secretly a Forge employee/share holder planting isolated positive reviews in obscure internet locations (highly unlikely) to drive up sales, he has no vested interest in saying so. I've included his entire review below obtained from "Target.com" which is one of many echoing similar sentiments.

    Glad to see that you agree about the exaggerated hype and the fact that most riders could not tell the difference between the minor nuances of what some make a big deal out of here. Common sense and a little intelligence drive most people to that conclusion.

    While I've been told that Deore shifters are superior, how will I tell the difference between Shimano ST-EF50 and Deore shifters if I've never used either before and compared the two???? Not one person who actually owns and uses the 7xx on this forum or who posted a review online (that I could find) complained about these entry-level shifters nor did they complain about anything regarding the Axel fork let alone that it randomly "locks out."

    ALL the components on the 7xx are "very low-end?" You might be right and know better than me but according to other 7xx owners on this forum and those who submitted reviews of the bike, the 7xx is actually composed of a mixture of entry-level ( Axel Fork, KS-291 shock), mid-grade (Shimano Acera rear derailleur for ex.) and higher end (Hays MX-2 brakes, WTB speeddisc rims and saddle) parts. Certainly not as high-end overall as the 5xx but not all around bottom of the barrel either. The 7xx owner I'm referring to who posted on this forum even went to the Shimano website, got a ranking of their sub-types and Acera was in the middle of the pack rather than at the bottom.


    You think that before long my bike is going to start breaking and I'm not going to want to ride anymore????????????? lol....Based on what? I mean, that is absolutely ridiculous! I think that's a bit over the top to say the least. You don't even know what kind of riding I do!! I think that unless you've owned and use this or any bike for an extended period of time and found, THROUGH YOUR OWN PERSONAL EXPERIENCE, that you were breaking parts prematurely on almost every ride, these kinds of factless, cynical and negative comments should be avoided especially being a mtb club president. Wouldn't you agree?


    QUOTE FROM SAWBACK 7xx REVIEW ON TARGET.COM:
    ""Great frame, very good components, excellent service!, February 3, 2008
    Reviewer: Biking4Jesus (Brandon, MS) - See all my reviews
    I have several dept. store bikes as well as a couple of bikes from bike shops. I couldn't believe the quality of the components and the frame on this [reasonably priced] full suspension bike. It is almost as good as my $2000 bike. I haven't seen any other bikes in this price range with front and rear disk brakes and adjustable shocks. The wheels, seat, seatpost, stem, and bar are all top quality brands or copies. The drivetrain is mid-range Shimano and could be upgraded for serious off-road ridiing. Unlike most dept. store dualies, the Forge can be riden hard on just about any trail. It would be nice to have a water bottle cage, but I usually use a hydration pack offroad anyway.
    I was really impressed with Forge's service. I got my bike at a salvage store, so I knew it was damaged. Other than cosmetic damage, the main problem was a bent brake rotor. I couldn't quite get it flattened, so I called Forge. They sent me a new rotor right away, and I haven't had any problems since. Great frame, very good components, excellent service!""
    - Conrad




    Call me crazy but this sounds like an honest review from a guy who knows his way around mountain bikes. It's difficult to ignore the many 7xx reviews like this, no?
    Take care,

    Mike
    Last edited by Sabrason; 10-16-2008 at 10:30 AM.

  14. #139
    mtbr member
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    Here's my entry level bike I have been and am still working on.
    ’97 Cannondale Killer V900HT


    Frame: Killer V900HT
    Fork: dd60 headshok
    Brakes: Tektro V brakes and levers
    Cranks: Coda 300
    Front Derailleur: Deore Lx
    Front Shifter: Deore XT M739
    Rear Shifter: Gripshift srt-800
    Rear Derailleur: Alivio m410
    Pedals: shimano pd-m515
    Stem: Coda Headshok
    Handlebar: Dirt Research bars
    Seatpost: kalloy sp-263b cut 100mm shorter
    Saddle: Cannondale f4 saddle
    Bottom Bracket:
    Cassette: Nashbar 7spd
    Headset: Headshok
    Grips: gripshift grips
    Tires: Schwinn Carbon steel ATB
    Wheels: cheapy front, rear Acera X hub unknown wheel
    Cheap cup and cone Bottom Bracket.
    Serfas s1 computer
    Weight: 27lbs.

    Upgrades to come after Christmas:
    Fatty Ultra disc fork.
    Avid bb7 mech front disk
    Ryno lite wheels with shimano deore hubs
    BBG bashguard
    Inner chain guide.


  15. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by savagemann
    that Access frame is made for and sold by performance bikes. They are sweet. I had 1 I got on clearance and rode for a while. Sold it to a buddy for $80 in new condition with some extra parts.
    If my memory serves me correctly, that frame weighs 2.8 lbs. Nice ride.
    thank you for the info! I didnt know that.

    Took it out on its maiden voyage today... found out that i need a beefier headset and seatpost. Switching the post to a Raceface downhill model.

    Keep in mind i am 6'4" 280... im a big boy.
    But other than that, not so much as a squibble out of the frame. I am super excited!

  16. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabrason


    ALL the components on the 7xx are "very low-end?" You might be right and know better than me but according to other 7xx owners on this forum and those who submitted reviews of the bike, the 7xx is actually composed of a mixture of entry-level ( Axel Fork, KS-291 shock), mid-grade (Shimano Acera rear derailleur for ex.) and higher end (Hays MX-2 brakes, WTB speeddisc rims and saddle) parts. Certainly not as high-end overall as the 5xx but not all around bottom of the barrel either. The 7xx owner I'm referring to who posted on this forum even went to the Shimano website, got a ranking of their sub-types and Acera was in the middle of the pack rather than at the bottom.
    Well, really, I hope you enjoy the bike. You've been defending the 7xx for quite awhile now. However, I've gotta agree with the others that have doubted the value of the 7xx. The components are all pretty much low-end. The Shimano Acera is definitely not mid-grade. When it comes to Shimano stuff, it goes (from low to high) :

    SIS (real junk)
    ALTUS
    ACERA
    ALIVO
    DEORE
    DEORE LX
    DEORE XT
    DEORE XTR

    Acera is pretty much at the low end. In fact, most people stray away from anything below Alivo for mountain bike trails, as Alivo is right at the beginning of Shimano's product line for specific mountain bike usage. Ask any bike shop and any bike tech, and they'll let you know that SIS/Acera/Altus components are primarily used for commuter bikes and light trail bikes, not mountain bikes. Trust me, I did my research and didn't even believe it/understand it at first. But you start checking really low end bikes, you and see that Altus and Acera pop up everywhere. Companies dump these products onto mountain bike frames because it's the cheapest route, not necessarily because it's matched for real xc/singletrack usage.

    I also have to disagree with your comment about the brakes. The MX-2 brakes are in no way high end. Compare the MX-2 to the rest of Hayes products. In fact, not too many people even seem to enjoy any of Haye's disc brakes products. They tend to produce lower quality disc's than other companies in the field. Calling the MX-2 a "high end" component is a bit of a stretch. I could maybe take it as a mid-level component, but high end? Yeeesh...I just can't buy that, especially when you compare it to other mechanical brakes.

    You can try and lump in the WTB rims and saddle as high end, but these parts are some of the most non-essential components on a bike. Anyone can put up with a junky saddle and maybe less-than-great rims. But settling for really low-end drivetrain parts is just asking for more spent money down the line. Again, it all depends on your use. But if I were hitting any intermediate trails, I'd make sure that at the very least, my fork and drivetrain could handle it for quite awhile, thus saving me headaches and money later, while providing me with an undeniably better ride quality. I'm still questioning how long the 7xx will last before stuff begins to wear out and break.

    Is it better than almost any department store bike? Sure, I could definitely see it. Is it better than other intro FS bikes? I'm gonna doubt that. Especially in the used market. And if FS is absolutely important to someone, then they might just want to either a.) go used or b.) save money for a complete package. For the same price of that 7xx, you can go hard-tail and get better components via the 5xx. That isn't even debatable. And if you are a beginner, is it really necessary to go FS?

    It could just be different strokes for different folks, but I know that if I friend were to ask my opinion on what to buy, I'd tell them get the hard-tail with better components, as it will undeniably have a lower risk of broken parts down the line, which should lead to a better enjoyment of the trails.

    Again, I really do hope you enjoy the 7xx, but I've also got to keep in mind that I remember you defending the bike before you even bought it. Give us a run-down when you put some good abuse on it. I really do hope that it is the killer deal for intro FS, because I like the Forge company and what they're doing.

    Best of luck

  17. #142
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    Here's mine, brand new with only 91km's on it (2 or 3 days of riding). It was regular $829 Cnd. on sale for $699 since it's a leftover 2008. I've read mixed reviews on here, but it seems to work really good for me since I've never rode anything good before. I'm 5'11 and about 140lbs, not doing any serious downhill riding or anything so I think it should hold up fine for me.








  18. #143
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    [QUOTE=holycrikey]Well, really, I hope you enjoy the bike. You've been defending the 7xx for quite awhile now. However, I've gotta agree with the others that have doubted the value of the 7xx. The components are all pretty much low-end. The Shimano Acera is definitely not mid-grade. When it comes to Shimano stuff, it goes (from low to high) :

    "I also have to disagree with your comment about the brakes. The MX-2 brakes are in no way high end......Calling the MX-2 a "high end" component is a bit of a stretch. I could maybe take it as a mid-level component, but high end?"

    Well, you'd actually be primarily disagreeing with the other 7xx owner who supposedly did his Shimano research and posted those comments. I don't care either way b/c I don't buy into the name-dropping hype and am not going to waste my valuable time scrutinizing the Shimano website. Makes no difference to me, and besides, my exact words were "higher end" not high end. There's a clear difference between the two. The other guy mis-quoted me too.


    "Again, it all depends on your use."

    Exactly, which is a point I made in my last post. It depends on a rider's use so for anyone to automatically dismiss an entry-level FS bike as low-end garbage and claim that it will surely break without knowing how it will be used or even owning one themselves is simply absurd. I could say the same thing about somebody's $1500 bike vs one costing $4000 and be correct in saying that the $1500 bike has a greater chance of wearing out and breaking. We can take that slippery-slope argument to the stratosphere if you want.


    "I'm still questioning how long the 7xx will last before stuff begins to wear out and break."

    Funny, b/c I bashed around on a Walmart Huffy HT for years and never broke a thing but all of a sudden, in your eyes, the clearly-superior 7xx is made of tissue paper and will surely wear out and break in no time?????????????????? I guess I'm lucky that I didn't defend my Huffy in here. God knows what you guys would've done to me. lol

    "For the same price of that 7xx, you can go hard-tail and get better components via the 5xx. That isn't even debatable."

    Nobody's denying that. I've even acknowledge that in one of my posts which makes me objective and realistic about this discussion. However, put identical riders on identical trails, one on a 7xx and one on a 5xx, and my money is on the 7xx getting that rider through that trail quicker and smoother b/c of it's FS frame. Why do I say that?? Because, IMO the mere presence of the 7xx's entry-level but adjustable rear shock/FS frame matters MORE than the 5xx's superior Deore shifters (for ex.) when the rubber actually meets the OFF-road.


    "It could just be different strokes for different folks, but I know that if I friend were to ask my opinion on what to buy, I'd tell them get the hard-tail with better components, as it will undeniably have a lower risk of broken parts down the line, which should lead to a better enjoyment of the trails."

    Boy, I would sure love to meet these people who's low-end bike components have broken soooo often that they are miserably unhappy about not buying a more expensive bike with better components. They must be hard-core to be breaking that much stuff all the time. Common sense tells me and most people that the breakage of any parts on any bike on a REGULAR BASIS due to inferior components/frame as opposed to freak accidents is a very rare occurence unless a rider is clearly exceeding the limitations of the bike and even then most bikes will hold up for a decent amount of time.

    "Again, I really do hope you enjoy the 7xx, but I've also got to keep in mind that I remember you defending the bike before you even bought it. Give us a run-down when you put some good abuse on it."

    Oh, I'm sure I'll enjoy it and I'll keep in mind that alot of name-dropping, component-obscessed riders in here who have NO EXPERIENCE with the 7xx are very quick to dismiss it based on nothing more than reading a component list despite overwhelmingly positive reviews from riders who actually own one. It doesn't say much for those people but I hope that you're all equal-opportunity bashers and are dishing out these negative opinions to every entry-level bike owner in here. If not, your anti-7xx comments could be viewed as biased.

    You want MY run down after I abuse the bike?? That's funny b/c the "run-down" by current 7xx owners all over the internet and in this forum who ACTUALLY OWN AND ABUSE THE BIKE and have done so a lot longer than I have has been nothing but positive. They all have great things to say about it. I guess their opinions don't count or don't you believe them??!! Have no fear though b/c as soon as I blow by a 5xx and/or a $1000+ comp. rig on the trail I'll let you know if my 7xx broke doing it.

    How about this: why don't you all reserve your judgement and instead allow those who actually own and use a bike and are therefore uniquely qualified to pass judgement on it do so. Man, I should really run for President.

    Take care
    Last edited by Sabrason; 10-17-2008 at 08:42 AM.

  19. #144
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    First post.

    Raleigh Mojave 8.0:




    Raleigh Mojave 8.0

    Upgrades:
    the seat from WTB Speed V (ouch) to a nice comfy Giant Unity.
    the pedals from some cheap (plastic center) cage pedals to Transition Bike Stepdown Pedals.
    the grips from the Raleigh branded "dual density" (super thin) to the OD Rogue Lock-on.



    Other than that, I bought a Camelbak and absolutely love it for those long rides.

    Now that the upgrade bug has been satisfied, I just enjoy riding my bike.



    Back to lurking,
    Bemis

  20. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by 350Rocket
    Here's mine, brand new with only 91km's on it (2 or 3 days of riding). It was regular $829 Cnd. on sale for $699 since it's a leftover 2008. I've read mixed reviews on here, but it seems to work really good for me since I've never rode anything good before. I'm 5'11 and about 140lbs, not doing any serious downhill riding or anything so I think it should hold up fine for me.







    Nice bike. I like it. But please lose the kickstand. That thing is bad news waiting to happen.

  21. #146
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    [SIZE="5"]specialized hardrock comp disc 08[/SIZE]
    Photobucket
    [SIZE="4"]i baught it a couple of moths ago on special for $679 australian
    ive so far found it to b one of the best hardtails ive ever ridden
    stock componants:
    avid bb5 disc brakes
    sr suntour forks
    sr suntour cranks
    shimano bottom bracket
    wellgo pedals
    and the list go's on.[/SIZE]
    Photobucket


    Photobucket
    [SIZE="5"]ive so far added these upgrades:
    titan headstem
    bullet valve caps (must haves XD)
    syncros bht 1 26x2.7 rear tyre (on the front for insane look)[/SIZE]
    Photobucket
    cheers
    adam

  22. #147
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    ^^Both really nice looking bikes :-)
    I didn't even realize that nobody else was leaving the kickstand on. I don't do real serious off road riding yet so not sure if it will be an issue for me. I'm not used to having to find something to lean it up against. I'll probably be sleeping and it'll fall on me and my girlfriend will get jealous. lol. I keep it nearby at night in the appt until the novelty of the new bike wears off.

    This was a lot of $$ for me to spend, anything higher than an entry level bike would have been out of the question for me, so I'll have to wait on upgrades until stuff starts to get worn out a bit. At least it has somewhat lower level components (Altus front derailleur, Deore rear, ST-EF60 shifters, etc.) making it more possible to do upgrades in the future. I don't tend to wear bikes out fast so it should take a while.

  23. #148
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    2008 Specialized HRXC

    Added shimano clipless pedals, new avid brake levels(big difference), rapid fire shifters(grip shifters blew), Specialized lock on grips The levers, grips, and shifters not pictured.

    Next is a wheelset, dt spokes, hope hubs, xc 717 rims

    pretty much upgrading the parts time to time, no rush, and then transfering everything over to a damn good frame.


  24. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by 350Rocket
    I didn't even realize that nobody else was leaving the kickstand on.
    I didn't know bikes still came with kickstands.

    You say you haven't done any serious offroad? Do some!!! It's a blast! I've been at this for just over a month and have ridden 4 trails so far.

    -Bemis

  25. #150
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    Well I just did some offroading today. Mainly backroads cruising until I found little rutted trails to ride on, and also some rocky hills to fly up and down. I tried to jump off of every rock and rough spot I could find. Yes it was a blast. But I guess when I said serious offroading I was thinking of jumps 6feet or more in the air, or flying down a rocky hill at 40mph+.

    Now that I'm actually using it offroad I'm already starting to think of the parts I'm going to wear out first and upgrades to make. First thing is in the spring I'll take the kickstand off. Not much riding left this year and I'll have it sitting in the appt on the kickstand all winter anyways. Front derailleur (Altus) I'll probably wear out first since they aren't the best from what I read. Maybe the pedals I'll replace soon after that, gave them some bashes on rocks already today. Who knows after that. Long term I may upgrade from 8 speed to 9 or 10 speed on the back for higher speed down long steep downhills on the road. My ass is pretty sore today, so a better seat or gel seat cover is going to be needed soon. Also a good headlight since if I get into good enough shape I'll be trying to make the 84km round trip to work every day which is going to be pitch black the whole 2hr ride in the morning.

    Another cool thing today was I met another Rocky Mountain owner today, who used to be a customer of mine when I was the service advisor at the Saturn dealership and now he makes deliveries to my work for the trucking company he works for. I didn't even know he was into biking, just saw him and stopped to say hi and he said he had the same brand of bike at home. Now I might have someone to ride with next summer.

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