1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Wrong Bike For A Trickster?

    About 6 weeks ago, I purchased the bike at this link:

    http://bicyclesource.us/itemdetails.cfm?ID=20306.

    The bike is a GREAT bike, but after seeing a few videos and talking to some riders, it seems that I got the wrong bike for tricks. I wanna use the bike for street riding, but I also want to be able to teach myself some basic tricks; wheelies, curb jumping, bunny hopping, endos, etc. My bike's frame seems to be much too high to do any tricks. When I'm on it in standing position, the bar is right up under my private parts with no room to spare. Even trying to pull wheelies on the thing seems impossible because of the bike's height. The guys that do the tricks seem to use bikes that are low rider versions of mountain bikes. The middle bars have a much lower slant and the seat is dropped way low, right over the rear wheel. They actually look more like over sized bmx bikes.
    I bought my bike at Performance bikes in Redondo Beach. If I were to take the bike I bought from them in and ask to trade it in for a more trick capable bike, would they go for that? I'm sure I'll have t pay a difference as the bike I currently own from them is considered "used", but I'm cool with that. Any info on if I should get the other style of bike I described that's more conducive to tricks and any info on if they'll let me trade my current bike in for a trick bike would be greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
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    That bike will take the "basic" tricks you mentioned, but any more extreme street riding (jumping off of walls, benches, etc.) you should get a bike specific to street/dirt jump riding that will be smaller and more maneuverable and built to take the abuse.

    The fact that the top tube is touching your crotch makes me think you got a bike that is a size or two too big for you.

    I have no idea what Performance's return policy is, so just call them.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Call_me_Al
    I have no idea what Performance's return policy is, so just call them.
    Performance has a very open policy - they will give you full credit. Don't let them tell you anything other than that, especially if you are getting your next bike there. They should trade it out for a DJ style bike.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero
    Performance has a very open policy - they will give you full credit. Don't let them tell you anything other than that, especially if you are getting your next bike there. They should trade it out for a DJ style bike.
    So the bike I was talking about, the one I described that's lower in center of gravity and they use for extreme tricks and whatnot, it's called a "DJ" style? Is that what I should tell the store clerk when I take my other bike in to trade it?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Desolate One
    So the bike I was talking about, the one I described that's lower in center of gravity and they use for extreme tricks and whatnot, it's called a "DJ" style? Is that what I should tell the store clerk when I take my other bike in to trade it?
    So what you got was an XC (cross country) bike. Trick bikes usually have a dirt-jump build - stouter frame, components, geometry made to be more trick-friendly.

    Something like this:
    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=3050

  6. #6
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    Here are some more bikes for your reference.

    Kona dirt jump (DJ)/street bike: http://www.konaworld.com/08_cowan_w.htm

    Cannondale DJ/street bike: http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/08/c...el-8FSDJ1.html

    Keep in mind that none of these bikes are designed to be efficient XC singletrack rides.

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