1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    10

    Is it worth getting a 5 year old bike? Help would be appreciated thanks :)

    Edited and shortened this post because the long essay I wrote just now won't be read by anybody in here :P
    So in summary, is worth buying a 5 year old bike? I've been eyeing a 2009 transition blindside for some time now. I'm on a budget, so cashing out the money for a new one will be very painful for me. It is in good condition and all, and I won't be doing mega hardcore riding, just rough trails, round the city (staircases, drop offs) and some downhill, so I don't think I need the newest model which can withstand a nuke.
    I've been riding on a cheap 400 hardtail for some time now and I think I'm worthy enough for an upgrade and learning how to handle more travel. But some people say that 5 year old models are weak and all that stuff. I think that's ********, the 2009 blindside looks really strong even at this point of time. But I'd like to ask for help from people around here.
    Is it worth it? It only had 1 owner who cared for it, thus the good condition. So is it worth getting a 2009 bike if I don't ride mega rough and I am pretty lightweight?
    Below is the picture of the actual blindside I am talking about.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Is it worth getting a 5 year old bike? Help would be appreciated thanks :)-image.jpg  

    Last edited by Timosg; 12-24-2013 at 09:02 AM. Reason: was a two page essay, nobody in the right state of mind would even read it

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    615
    Full suspension technology over the last 5 year's looks like it's realtively stable, so a 5 year old bike should work almost as well as a current model. Anything older than that starts getting questionable, especially if it's over 10 years.

    Second, I don't know if this is the best bike for what you're riding. It has a really steep headtube, and is built like a tank, might be a lot of overkill and wasted money. It'll do what you need, but I'd keep an eye out for something more XC designed. Also, going from a tyax to this would be a huge jump. You might not notice it on a short ride through the city, but after a couple miles in the woods, you'll probably regret it. The tyax frame is actually a decent frame, and if it worked well for you, a full suspension XC bike would be my recommended next bike.

    Third, I think the price is a little bit high for this bike, especially if it was used for it's intended purpose. Really depends on condition, and replacement bushings/shocks aren't cheap if it was used. I do a basic estimate of 5-10% price drop per year plus 20% off for being used, based on new price (actual sale/purchase price of a new bike, not MSRP). For example, a 2 year old bike should be about 30-40% of what I can get a new bike for, a 4 year old bike should be 40-50%, 5 year at 45-55% off if in good condition. This bike would be 50% off, so not bad. The bad part, it's an all-mountain bike, so the original owner might have taken it on stuff that will cause premature wear. I'm just leary of used high quality bikes where the owner only took them out occasionally. It's like buying a classic muscle car where the original owner only took it to church once a week. It could happen, but not likely.

    If you're comfortable working on bikes, I'd buy a new full suspension from an online bike store. You should be able to get a decent bike for about $1,200 USD. I'm not familiar with shipping/import to singapore, so this might get a lot more difficult. Were there any other bikes you were looking at or test rode from local bike shops?

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    10
    Well, I tried a bottle rocket which had 150m of travel on it and was actually more pleased than with a blindside. The bottle rocket is really a much more fun bike to ride every where due to having less travel, but I can only find it first hand. I've also tried the specialized enduro but it had 160mm of travel, a pretty big jump from 100 and It took me a while to get used to it.
    Just like you said, I was worrying about the same thing, 180mm might just be too large to hop on straight away, hence I will re-think my decision and prehaps actually save up more and get a first hand if it benefits me over the long run.
    Do you have any bikes you would recommend? A full sus with about 140-150mm of travel? I really liked the bottle rocket for its geometry and versatility but I'm sure there are other bikes out there which could suit me better since I ride more of xc-trails.

    And thanks a lot for your reply man!!! Made me re think of getting so much travel straight away, and Merry Christmas!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    10
    I forgot to mention, I looked up for some bikes and the Specialized pitch comp interested me, it seems like a good bike for the riding I wish to do, and it's 2000USD, which with some extra saving is possible. What do you think about it?

  5. #5
    FKA Malibu412
    Reputation: Glide the Clyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    4,233
    If the price is reasonable, the bike is in good condition and safe, if it fits you well and fits the style of riding you do, then yes it's worth it.

    However, coming from a cheap $400 ht and likely mostly xc-style riding (since that's about all I'd do on a ht of any type unless I was a skilled jumper), I'd question if a bigger travel fs such as the Blindside is the best choice. But you're already kinda figuring that out.

    Look in the used market for 140-150mm travel bikes, no older than 2008-2009 models and try to buy local so you can check fit and condition. Any of the better brands will have something that fits your criteria.

    Good luck with your search

    Watts, I think you meant the Transition has a slacker head angle, not steeper
    Everything that kills me, makes me feel alive

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13,240
    A lot of brands' suspension designs have been pretty stable for the last five years.

    People sometimes use bikes like this for urban stuff. Sort of funny - the moves get bigger and people go to tiny little trials bikes and BMXs and big honkin' FR bikes and abandon the middle.

    I guess the questions are, do your rough trails go up and down or just down, how do you get to the tops of trails, and does "downhill" to you mean shuttling to the tops of things in a pickup truck or ski lift and then bombing down them, or does it mean that the trails you ride on also travel down. And, how do you get to the tops of things?

    If you've been looking at this bike for a while, can we assume it belongs to an acquaintance? At least where I am, people move bikes on Craig's List relatively quickly...

    I think people are way too prone to making little incremental steps. If you're doing shuttle DH and riding off of loading docks, why not get a Big Bike?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    10
    Well, it's 10 am here and I just came back from a Christmas morning trail. I have to say, you guys were correct and I was pretty stupid to want a 180mm bike. I've seen a whole bunch of people today with super long travel bikes, and even being very fit, they all struggled to get up the climbs while I wizzed past them on my guardrail , I dont know why, it's just a habit for a lot of Singapore riders to get 180-200mm travel bikes and trail with them.
    I have made a choice to step back from that. I will most certainly look like nothing more than a poser riding simple terrain with a dh/fr bike.

    On the other hand, I've met a guy from Scotland whom I met before on the trails, and he let me try his enduro, it was awesome, and even 160mm travel is already a lot for me coming from a hardtail.

    So yeah, I've reconsidered, I'll give the blindside a pass since I need climbing abilities as well as going down, and seeing the people with demos and trek scratches look so funny today made me rethink.
    I'm now saving up either for the enduro or the bottle rocket. An enduro would be cheaper than the bottle rocket, but I've tried the bottle rocket a number of times at the shop and it's so so fun! They had a double ring installed in front so climbing was no problem too . I will research further though, I believe there are more bikes out there to suit my needs than the two I mentioned, and waiting for a while instead of bluntly getting the first bike I see would be a better choice.
    Thanks again, and sorry to all, I was pretty stupid thinking a 180mm would fit my needs.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,312
    Quote Originally Posted by Timosg View Post
    I forgot to mention, I looked up for some bikes and the Specialized pitch comp interested me, it seems like a good bike for the riding I wish to do, and it's 2000USD, which with some extra saving is possible. What do you think about it?
    I've had a few friends that owned Pitches and they worked great as all-around trail bikes, and even for some occasional DH type riding with some burlier wheels and tires thrown on. They seem to be priced well for their performance.
    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    615
    Not stupid, just ambitious. The spur of the moment purchases get us all at one point in time.

    If you're set on a full suspension, check out the airborne bikes (hobgoblin) and some of the bikesdirect bikes (motobecane fantom). Their prices are pretty good for what you get, if you can get them delivered overseas cheap and are mechanically inclined. This where finding a local online bike seller will help you the most, shipping/customs might kill any savings from ordering online from outside Singapore. I'd stay away from anything with a suntour XCT/XCM/XCR fork though. If you've been riding you're bike (which I regard as a decent starter bike comparable to any other decent quality entry level mountain bike, although I noticed you remove the name), you're probably aware of the entry level suntour fork limitations.

  10. #10
    R.I.P. DogFriend
    Reputation: jeffj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,755
    First of all, if someone can't take a minute to consider more than a couple sentences of details to consider your unique dilemma, I wouldn't put too much stock in their responses. The more info, the better.

    That Blindside is a pretty burly beast to be riding around town. It's a 'bike park' type bike for riding lift assisted trails. Freeride type stuff. Jumps, drops and rugged descents. OTOH, it would be a lug to pedal around town, unless you are a fairly hard core urban freerider.

    Based on the info given by the OP, I would say it's not a bad bike or a bad deal per se, but it's not likely to be the right bike for what he wants to do.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    127
    When I bought my current MTB 9 years ago it was the sh*t. It's every bit as good today as it was back then (with a bit of maintenance a few parts replacements). Of course design and technology have advanced a bit since then, and the ranged of bikes tailored to specific pursuits has increased, but that doesn't make my bike perform and less.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,312
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    First of all, if someone can't take a minute to consider more than a couple sentences of details to consider your unique dilemma, I wouldn't put too much stock in their responses. The more info, the better.
    Unless of course somebody is responding just to repeat all the same advice you already seem to have taken. The number of characters typed doesn't really have any bearing on the quality of information given. (I'm assuming since I had the shortest post in this thread, you're directing your comment at my response to the OP's query about a Pitch. I didn't see any purpose in re-typing the solid advice that everyone else had already given; doesn't really add anything useful to the conversation IMO.)
    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    10
    Well on my current bike I do run a suntour XTC and a sram x4 drive train, I am getting close to destroying the fork, so will have to do a servicing soon, shouldn't be too difficult since it's such a simple fork, but yes, I wouldn't want another suntour on my next bike. Still, I am very happy with the mongoose tyax because it is my first mountain bike on which I have learned most of the skills, both riding and servicing. It's an awesome hardtail for it's price, and though with X4 I have to know the trail so I can start shifting gear like 50 metres before the steep climb in case it fails to shift and I need to try again XD, that's compensated by how sturdy it actually is.
    When my dad first got it for me a couple of years back, I was super excited, then I went home and did some research, finding out that mongoose have sold their name to wallmart and blah blah blah, hence I felt a little discouraged, but once I took it on trail for the first few times, and it survived numerous falls and fails, I realized this is a very solid bike, and is definitely totally worth the money. I was thinking of upgrading it actually instead of getting a new bike, but then I decided to keep it as it is for XC and commuting around the city, going to shops for example, since no matter how many locks you bring, you won't really want to leave a 4000 dollar bike chained to a pillar outside, those sneaky thief bastards will find a way to snatch it if they really want it.


    Speaking about what I have thought. I have decided to save up for a Transition Bottle Rocket, which was recently put on sale on a 2nd hand bike website here in Singapore, it costs more than the blindside I talked about earlier, but is newer and is still in almost unused condition. It has 170mm of travel yes, which makes it very similar to the blindside, however I have tried the bottle rocket before and even with a 160mm fork on it I could climb relatively well, so I'll just set more sag on the 170mm one or swap it for a talas. Either way, since I tried it before, I really enjoy the way it rides, so I think I will settle with that, and perhaps like I said, give it a little less travel once I buy it, about 150-160mm.

    I have tried a few others including the enduro and the giant reign, but the bottle rocket is really something I wanted for a long time because of it's geometry and versatility. I can climb on it, not very fast, I don't really care how fast I climb up since the downhill afterwards is worth any climb, but climb well, even on steep uphills.
    So yeah, I think I'll set for a bottle rocket, unless something changes my mind by about the end of February when I will finally have enough savings to get it.

    Thanks for all your advice once again people, and if you do think you can suggest something better or state your opinion on my decision, I'll be glad to read what you wrote and consider the advice

  14. #14
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13,240
    Good luck.

    If the fork on your existing bike becomes unsafe, consider rigid. More than enough for kicking around town and cheap.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    10
    Alright, thanks for all the help guys
    Last edited by Timosg; 12-26-2013 at 05:19 PM.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Sallen4520's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    110

    Is it worth getting a 5 year old bike? Help would be appreciated thanks :)

    Check out the ns soda built at the same factory as the bottle rocket and roughly the same geo with more features and can be had for pretty cheap. Check lama cycles.com And ns bikes web site I'm riding a soda now and like it a lot.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    615
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Good luck.

    If the fork on your existing bike becomes unsafe, consider rigid. More than enough for kicking around town and cheap.
    Second on the rigid fork. If the bike will be used for comuting, a rigid fork will serve you well. I found a rigid chromoly fork off a 29er monocog that I put on a hybrid bike I use for commuting/exercise. About 2 pounds lighter, and better handling. I wouldn't rebuild an XCT fork, unless you're simply taking it apart, cleaning it, and putting it back together (I've done it on a friends junkyard bike, very easy, and did wonders). They're just not worth the cost of replacement bushings/sleeves, and it's actually pretty hard to find parts for the low end suntours. This is where rockshox trumps. Super easy to rebuild, and seal kits are readily available.

    If theft is really an issue, do a half-a$$ spray paint on the frame. Based on my past experience, nobody wants to steal a bike that looks like it was put together by a kid (pokemon stickers on the derailure are an awesome touch) or has an easily distinguishable paint scheme.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    10
    Checked out the NS soda, damn it is very similar to a bottle rocket, I actually managed to found and add in which one is being sold, but unfortunately the single speed at the rear isn't matching with my riding.
    Also, I have found another bike which I absolutely fell in love with too, the 2011 intense Uzzi, the shop has one which is set up with a 160mm fork and I went crazy about it once I tried, it's a beast on descents, can climb, not amazingly, but all that matters is that it can climb, because I climb not for the enjoyment of it but to enjoy the downhill afterwards :P and the uzzi just looks so damn sexy. I have yet to try the NS soda, but judging by it's similar geometry with the bottle rocket, I will highly consider it, if I manage to find somebody selling it with multiple gears at the back.

    And watts yeah I was thinking of making a cosmetic signature on my bike, maybe leave a couple of dings there and there, or paint a portion of it. In Singapore though I've noticed, the thief won't go for your bike if they see that it is well secured with 2 or more locks. There are cameras everywhere here so burglars here have to work insanely fast if they want to get away with it, so they mostly go for bikes whos owners are stupid enough to only secure by the wheel on it's own.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    10
    On the other hand, I have noticed that there aren't many trails here where I live and I don't really get to go overseas, and hence I actually would not mind at all a fs with 100mm of travel on each side, and hence I was too considering the transition double, what do you think guys? I'm not narrowing it down to a double, but any 100-120mm fs bikes. Because after thinking, it would be nice to have a bike with lotsa travel like the bottle rocket or the uzzi or others, but on the other hand if I only do trails and city riding, a nice, nimble fs with less travel would be nice too
    What do you think?

    Because I am a bit confused. On one hand, I do want a bike with 160mm of travel to be able to bomb through stuff, but on the other hand, there is not much stuff to bomb and utilize 160mm, and a 100mm on both sides like the transition double will be much more nimble and lightweight, and also give me the ability to try jumping :0 I have been thinking hard and still have not decided.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: traffic002's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,703
    Quote Originally Posted by Timosg View Post
    On the other hand, I have noticed that there aren't many trails here where I live and I don't really get to go overseas, and hence I actually would not mind at all a fs with 100mm of travel on each side, and hence I was too considering the transition double, what do you think guys? I'm not narrowing it down to a double, but any 100-120mm fs bikes. Because after thinking, it would be nice to have a bike with lotsa travel like the bottle rocket or the uzzi or others, but on the other hand if I only do trails and city riding, a nice, nimble fs with less travel would be nice too
    What do you think?

    Because I am a bit confused. On one hand, I do want a bike with 160mm of travel to be able to bomb through stuff, but on the other hand, there is not much stuff to bomb and utilize 160mm, and a 100mm on both sides like the transition double will be much more nimble and lightweight, and also give me the ability to try jumping :0 I have been thinking hard and still have not decided.
    You really need to consider the trails nearby. Your current level of fitness and participation in the sport and of course your budget. You want the nicest bike you can afford. But at the same time, suit it to your intended riding.

    I've been helping a friend get into the sport. He first shows up with a Pronghorn (100mm travel XC race bike) Great bike. Light, stiff. But with our wet roots and rocks, it was really challenging for him. He then shows up with a KONA Coilair because he wants to ride downhill (of which he lacks the skill for).

    So in the end, I helped him find a 7y/o Cannondale Prophet. In its day, it was a great All-Mountain bike. It probably work well for a trail bike now. Can climb, can descend, is comfy for all day riding and won't break the bank.

    Now that his skill level is up, the Pronghorn might be a fun challenge to ride something with steep head angle and little suspension travel over the roots and rocky terrain we have. His skill is now good enough that he can take the Coilair to some of the climb for an hour and then come down type of trails.

    Of course through it all, I ride a 150mm Hardtail...

    Start with a bike that is modestly appropriate for the local trails, the local riding group, or your buddies. Keep it fun and entertaining so you'll stick with the sport. Once you've had a full season under your belt, you'll be able to see and feel the difference in bikes and make good decisions on what bike works best for you.
    Just get out and ride!

  21. #21
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13,240
    A lot of us probably ride one or two spots most of the time. So it's not necessarily short-sighted to choose a bike that works well for your usual spots.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    10
    Then I'll take bottle rocket or the uzzi with 150mm of travel, not too much, but also more than enough to tackle the rough stuff.
    As for now, I'll ride the hardtail till I completely destroy the parts and then convert it to a city commuting bike

Similar Threads

  1. Is it worth buying a bike of year 2003 for $200?
    By adi700 in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-19-2013, 04:23 AM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-08-2013, 10:04 PM
  3. Is my 4 year old bike worth upgrading further?
    By curtaincarot in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-13-2013, 02:05 PM
  4. ASR-7 most under appreciated bike?
    By Plauscha in forum Yeti
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 11-11-2011, 10:20 AM
  5. Buying my first bike, help is appreciated
    By SquallRealm in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-27-2011, 07:47 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •