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  1. #1
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    Work Out Trunk Bike

    Hello,

    THE PROBLEM
    I was give a huffy mountain bike a week ago, my idea was to transfer all the parts from the huffy bike over to a aluminum frame. I jumped before i leaped because when i bought the frame took apart the bike. I realized that
    1) Bottom Bracket needs a special tool to remove it
    2) The gears need a special tool to remove it.
    3) There are 2 different size steerers
    4) Its cheaper to buy it then to build it
    5) The motobeacan frame i bought uses disc brakes only.
    Now I have a garage full of huffy 18speed bike parts and a aluminum motobecane frame (20in i think)

    THE PLAN
    I have become very interested in mountain bikes and have done some research and would like the experience of building my own bike rather then just cutting my losses and buying one (the education i receive will offset the extra money i spend).
    The end result is I would like a bike, that can fit inside my trunk without having to lower my rear seats (I live, work, and go to school in a rough area, and would not like to tempt anyone with my bike hanging from my trunk or visible with my rear seats lowered).

    THE QUESTION
    I have a motobecan aluminum from 20.5in I will be tranferring all componet from a Schwinn 2001 Moab 3 Hardtail Bike. (brakes, handlebars, forks, etc) I will be removing the hubs from the 26in wheels and putting them on a 24in wheel, i will be putting 24x3 tires on these wheels. The question I have is since my choice of component is based on a me being able to store my bike in my trunk and increasing rolling resistance for more effort and less speed, and not on the quality of the ride, safety or even function of the bike. I would like everyones opinions on possible problems i will have with this kind of setup such as is i were to make a slight turn i will automatically role over 3 time...
    The smaller diameter makes it so that the rear wheel can wedge inside the wheel well of my car, the large width adds more rolling resistance (more friction force). The front tire will be removable. I did a dummy fit of the frame with forks and 26in tires from the huffy it did not fit the way i wanted it to and I think that a 24in tire will give me the clerance i need to have it sit some what flat on its side.

    MY BACKGROUND
    Begining of this year i started to adopt a healthier more active life style, since then I have lost 50lbs. Most of my outdoor activity has been running, this has led to a very painful foot injury, and has slowed down my progress. I want to take up biking because when i run in the park the people ridding there bikes look like there having more fun then the joggers, plus its something i find interesting. I will be returing to school for my engrg degree, i left 2.5 years ago. I would like to use this bike to ride around on campus. My large size 5'10 265lbs (from 315) make bike choice rather limited.

    Thanks in advance
    LP
    Last edited by lmp1054; 07-09-2011 at 06:09 PM.

  2. #2
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    well i think you left out one thing...what kind of car is it?

  3. #3
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    Its a 2006 chevy malibu

    I tested how it would fit using the tires and forks from the huffy. It fit but had to be slightly at a angle. With the smaller rear wheel, it can fit closer to the back rear of my trunk and will be able to lay flat, i would like to make some kind of blocks that can support the bike, and given the peddles clerance.
    Last edited by lmp1054; 07-09-2011 at 06:13 PM.

  4. #4
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    Wait, I'm lost. So your going to use your 24in wheels on your new frame just to fit it in your trunk? Why not just buy a cheap bike rack?
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by lmp1054 View Post
    The end result is I would like a bike, that can fit inside my trunk without having to lower my rear seats (I live, work, and go to school in a rough area, and would not like to tempt anyone with my bike hanging from my trunk or visible with my rear seats lowered).
    I have a question about the 26" wheels you currently own. Do they have quick-release skewers, like this?

    If not, you might want to search craigslist for a cheap set of wheels that have quick release skewers (or are compatible). This way you can simply remove the front wheel (and the rear wheel if need be) to fit the bike in your trunk. And, you get to keep the proper wheel size the frame is designed for.

  6. #6
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    or take the front wheel off, maybe a quick release, then it'll fit in the trunk.
    sell the parts at a swapmeet, craigslist, put the Huffy back together, sell the Huffy, get a real bike and continue on your health quest first and foremost, congradulations on the weight loss, and good luck with the bike mess..
    Maybe you should give up the idea of being a bike mechanic for now..
    Four wheels transport the body,

    Two wheels transport the soul !!!!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by lmp1054 View Post
    I will be removing the hubs from the 26in wheels and putting them on a 24in wheel, i will be putting 24x3 tires on these wheels.
    Any reason why you're planning to use the hub off an existing 26" wheel on a 24" rim as opposed to buying a 24" wheelset? 24" wheels are not very popular anymore and you might run into issues like getting proper length spokes if your hub even matches up with the wheel (28/32/36 spokes). Also, you'll have to deal with getting proper tension on the spokes while getting the wheel properly dished/trued. You're around my weight (I'm 250), so having a properly built wheel is even more critical than if you were lighter so if you must try smaller wheels I'd advise you to look for a built up wheelset from the get go.

    Just to make sure it's covered: Did you try it in the trunk with the seatpost off the bike? I have a friend who fits his Giant XTC 29" in the trunk of a small Honda with the front wheel and seat post off.

    Also, to avoid purchasing 24" wheels you could always just take the rear wheel off also. It's a pain the first few times but if you shift down into the smallest rear cog it's not too bad to remove and you could keep a couple of shop rags in the trunk to keep your hands clean when dealing with the chain.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry_K View Post
    ... you could keep a couple of shop rags in the trunk to keep your hands clean when dealing with the chain.
    Good idea. Or, just keep a pair of cotton gloves in the trunk for handling the chain while working with the wheel.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfox90 View Post
    Wait, I'm lost. So your going to use your 24in wheels on your new frame just to fit it in your trunk? Why not just buy a cheap bike rack?
    I live work and go to school in a rough area of town. Best way to not have your stuff stolen or have your car broken into is by not having it visible. If I have my bike stolen while its hanging off my trunk the cops will litterly laugh at me and tell me its my own fault that my bike was stolen.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by marpilli View Post
    I have a question about the 26" wheels you currently own. Do they have quick-release skewers, like

    If not, you might want to search craigslist for a cheap set of wheels that have quick release skewers (or are compatible). This way you can simply remove the front wheel (and the rear wheel if need be) to fit the bike in your trunk. And, you get to keep the proper wheel size the frame is designed for.
    yes it does have a quick release skewer on the front tire only. Are they available for rear tires with disk brakes?

    My plan was just the front wheel comes off and the bike will sit flat in my trunk with the handle bars perallel to the frame

    I guess since i am not a normal bike rider, i do not understand what i lose from going from 26in to 24in.

    Can you please explain what I lose by going to a smaller tire?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by manabiker View Post
    or take the front wheel off, maybe a quick release, then it'll fit in the trunk.
    sell the parts at a swapmeet, craigslist, put the Huffy back together, sell the Huffy, get a real bike and continue on your health quest first and foremost, congradulations on the weight loss, and good luck with the bike mess..
    Maybe you should give up the idea of being a bike mechanic for now..
    Thank you.

    I have already put the huffy back together, plan to use it as much as i can.

    the reason it is so important for me to have this bike fit well in my trunk is because of my commute. I live 25miles from my campus 15miles from were I work (this is very common in Houston) in between were i work and go to school is a very nice park with jogging and biking trails, I would like to be able to go into that park and bike ride for a hour or two till traffic dies down and then go home. Also i would like to use it while I am on campus.

    Bike mechanic does not look difficult I have worked as a hydraulic mechanic for a few years 7 years total in the industry (i was 16 when i started working as a assistant) I have experience working in related fields.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry_K View Post
    Any reason why you're planning to use the hub off an existing 26" wheel on a 24" rim as opposed to buying a 24" wheelset? 24" wheels are not very popular anymore and you might run into issues like getting proper length spokes if your hub even matches up with the wheel (28/32/36 spokes). Also, you'll have to deal with getting proper tension on the spokes while getting the wheel properly dished/trued. You're around my weight (I'm 250), so having a properly built wheel is even more critical than if you were lighter so if you must try smaller wheels I'd advise you to look for a built up wheelset from the get go.

    Just to make sure it's covered: Did you try it in the trunk with the seatpost off the bike? I have a friend who fits his Giant XTC 29" in the trunk of a small Honda with the front wheel and seat post off.

    Also, to avoid purchasing 24" wheels you could always just take the rear wheel off also. It's a pain the first few times but if you shift down into the smallest rear cog it's not too bad to remove and you could keep a couple of shop rags in the trunk to keep your hands clean when dealing with the chain.
    The hubs are were the disc brakes are mounted, and the 24in wheel hubs do not have a place to mount the brakes. I have not tried to find a wheel set. I thought the quickest least wasteful and cheapest route was to switch out hubs, and reuse the spokes, i did not know that there could be a length issue. Ill start looking at wheels sets thanks.

    I mounted the huffy forks (held on with duct tape) and rear wheel, i didnt add the seat post, to test how it will fit in my trunk.

    I would like to avoid removing the rear wheel if possible. I want to have the least amount of setup time.

    I guess like i mentioned before since I am not a regular biker, i dont know what will be the difference with a smaller wheel. Everyone has given me good feedback but no real reason why i should maintain the 26in tire.

    The benefit I see is I will be able to fit this bike into my trunk very easily. So i would like to know what I will be losing by switching to 24in tires so i can weigh it against that.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by lmp1054 View Post
    I would like to avoid removing the rear wheel if possible. I want to have the least amount of setup time.

    I guess like i mentioned before since I am not a regular biker, i dont know what will be the difference with a smaller wheel. Everyone has given me good feedback but no real reason why i should maintain the 26in tire.

    The benefit I see is I will be able to fit this bike into my trunk very easily. So i would like to know what I will be losing by switching to 24in tires so i can weigh it against that.
    I see why it sounds like a good idea on the surface, and really, if it was just a matter of buying a 24" wheelset and bolting it on then the only real negative I can come up with would be that a 20in frame bike with the smaller wheels would look kind of strange.

    If you'll be strictly be riding on pavement/smooth trails you won't have any issues running smaller wheels, for that matter you could even drop down to 20"s but at that point the bike would really look silly. You'll have no issues strength wise with a properly built 24" wheelset, they'll be rigid and strong due to being smaller, the main issue comes down to you not having a functional set of 24" wheels yet, you'll either have to find a prebuilt set that's disc brake ready and has the proper spacing on the rear hub (likely 135mm for your Motobecame frame) or get a set builtup from a local builder. There's a lot on your bike you can easily/safely do after watching a few well made how-to videos but I would not put wheel building in that category. Most wheel builders will not re-use spokes and many will not rebuild a rim to a new hub so you may be looking at having to buy all new components except maybe your existing hubs. With the hubs already being 10yrs old I'd probably lean towards just buying all new components to build up the wheels. It's definately possible to build up the wheels you're seeking but it seems awfully close to trying to fit a square peg in a round hole.

    The main reason everyone is trying to sway you from going to the 24's (which boils down to it being non-standard by todays standards) is the amount of trouble you're likely to run into trying to successfully get a set of 24" wheels mated to your bike. Not to mention the low number of tire options, most 24" tires I found online were "out of stock".

    I know that taking both wheels off to get it in your trunk could be a nuisance but after you've done it a few times it gets much quicker/easier to do. During the spring I swap between three different tires on the front/rear of my bike depending on the conditions and which trail I'm heading to. It's really easy to pop the wheels on when it's sitting upside on the ground. Just shift to highest gear and move the derailleur out of the way and it pops right into place. I think it takes about 5-7 seconds longer than doing the front. And in 3 months when a rogue rock/branch puts a ding on your wheel you can get it fixed up pretty quickly at any bike shop if you have a 26" or 29" wheel. Many would probably have to special order a rim or spokes to get you back up and running on a 24".

  14. #14
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    is the rear not quick release either?

    if it is you should have no problem fitting everything in your truck

  15. #15
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    Just get a rear wheel with quick release and put it all in the trunk. No sense in making a mountain out of a mole hill and the end result would be better anyways.
    Even if you're good at mechanics, the problem would be you don't have all the tools required as you've learned.
    A set of 24" wheels could work but if you ever wanna go trail riding 26 would be MUCH better.
    It's nice to learn how to wrench on your bike but IMO it's much nicer to ride your bike so maybe just buy a used 1 that fits your needs and go. Leave the wrenching for the winter.
    Round and round we go

  16. #16
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    A 24"x3" tire will have a very similar O.D. as a 26"x2.x", you're not actually saving much room there. On top of that, your BB height will be lower which might increase your chances of pedal strike depending on what kind of trails you're riding.

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    OP Is the area between work & school that you plan to ride Memorial park?? You will find in houston we have a crapload of big roots & they will not be fun or easy on 24's. could you possibly use a bike rack & keep your bike inside at work & in your classroom?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by RidinginSF View Post
    A 24"x3" tire will have a very similar O.D. as a 26"x2.x", you're not actually saving much room there. On top of that, your BB height will be lower which might increase your chances of pedal strike depending on what kind of trails you're riding.
    The OD of a 24in wheel is ~24in the OD of a 26in wheel is ~26in. 24x3 tire is 24in tall and 3in wide. a 26x2.x is 26in tall and 2.xin wide. The farthest points on the bike is reduced by two inches (one inch decrease on each end)

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry_K View Post
    I see why it sounds like a good idea on the surface, and really, if it was just a matter of buying a 24" wheelset and bolting it on then the only real negative I can come up with would be that a 20in frame bike with the smaller wheels would look kind of strange.

    If you'll be strictly be riding on pavement/smooth trails you won't have any issues running smaller wheels, for that matter you could even drop down to 20"s but at that point the bike would really look silly. You'll have no issues strength wise with a properly built 24" wheelset, they'll be rigid and strong due to being smaller, the main issue comes down to you not having a functional set of 24" wheels yet, you'll either have to find a prebuilt set that's disc brake ready and has the proper spacing on the rear hub (likely 135mm for your Motobecame frame) or get a set builtup from a local builder. There's a lot on your bike you can easily/safely do after watching a few well made how-to videos but I would not put wheel building in that category. Most wheel builders will not re-use spokes and many will not rebuild a rim to a new hub so you may be looking at having to buy all new components except maybe your existing hubs. With the hubs already being 10yrs old I'd probably lean towards just buying all new components to build up the wheels. It's definately possible to build up the wheels you're seeking but it seems awfully close to trying to fit a square peg in a round hole.

    The main reason everyone is trying to sway you from going to the 24's (which boils down to it being non-standard by todays standards) is the amount of trouble you're likely to run into trying to successfully get a set of 24" wheels mated to your bike. Not to mention the low number of tire options, most 24" tires I found online were "out of stock".

    I know that taking both wheels off to get it in your trunk could be a nuisance but after you've done it a few times it gets much quicker/easier to do. During the spring I swap between three different tires on the front/rear of my bike depending on the conditions and which trail I'm heading to. It's really easy to pop the wheels on when it's sitting upside on the ground. Just shift to highest gear and move the derailleur out of the way and it pops right into place. I think it takes about 5-7 seconds longer than doing the front. And in 3 months when a rogue rock/branch puts a ding on your wheel you can get it fixed up pretty quickly at any bike shop if you have a 26" or 29" wheel. Many would probably have to special order a rim or spokes to get you back up and running on a 24".
    Okay thank you for the information from what i gathered

    The cons for reduced wheel size, the building of the bike requires some experience and knowledge of wheel building, which i do not have. The availability of these wheels is less common then the 26in wheels.

    The Pros for reduced wheel size, is that I will be lighter and be a better fit in my trunk.

    One question i have is will this spoil my riding experience? Like i said before are there any safety issues with smaller wheels?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARCHAIC View Post
    OP Is the area between work & school that you plan to ride Memorial park?? You will find in houston we have a crapload of big roots & they will not be fun or easy on 24's. could you possibly use a bike rack & keep your bike inside at work & in your classroom?
    Yes, I plan to ride my bike in memorial park. The reason I chose the 24in wheel size is also because its available on all young and short riders bike. Which i see ridding these kind of trails all the time. The level of rider i am now seems like I would not benefit from the better performace of the 26in wheels.

    The purpose of this bike is to have it available in my trunk when I want to bike across memorial, or campus.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by lmp1054 View Post
    Yes, I plan to ride my bike in memorial park. The reason I chose the 24in wheel size is also because its available on all young and short riders bike. Which i see ridding these kind of trails all the time. The level of rider i am now seems like I would not benefit from the better performace of the 26in wheels.

    The purpose of this bike is to have it available in my trunk when I want to bike across memorial, or campus.
    it was just my.02

    hope everything works out for ya

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARCHAIC View Post
    it was just my.02

    hope everything works out for ya
    Thank you again for your input.


    To narrow down the use of my bike. I will be using semi-slick flat resistant tires.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by lmp1054 View Post
    The OD of a 24in wheel is ~24in the OD of a 26in wheel is ~26in. 24x3 tire is 24in tall and 3in wide. a 26x2.x is 26in tall and 2.xin wide. The farthest points on the bike is reduced by two inches (one inch decrease on each end)
    While it's true that a 24x3 should be 3" wide it will also be taller than a smaller 24" tire. I found an old thread earlier (on another forum) and a guy measured two 24x3 tires and both were about 25.6" tall while mounted/aired up. Also, you may run into fit issues with your fork and rear stays with a 3" wide tire. To gain the advantage you're seeking you'll have to seek out smaller tires. Just to compare, I put some Kenda Komfort 26x1.95 street tires on my wife's bike and they're only 25.75" tall so you'll only be saving about two-tenths of an inch with 24x3 tires.

    You asked in one post about any possible safety issues. The only one I can think is if you do go with smaller 24x2 sized tires you'll be dropping the bottom bracket by about an inch over the 26" wheels and you'll be much more likely to have pedal strikes when cornering or going over small obstacles. A pedal strike at the wrong time can cause a crash or cause some nice scars on your shin. If you're lucky it may be nothing more than just a reminder to be more careful going around a tight turn.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry_K View Post
    While it's true that a 24x3 should be 3" wide it will also be taller than a smaller 24" tire. I found an old thread earlier (on another forum) and a guy measured two 24x3 tires and both were about 25.6" tall while mounted/aired up. Also, you may run into fit issues with your fork and rear stays with a 3" wide tire. To gain the advantage you're seeking you'll have to seek out smaller tires. Just to compare, I put some Kenda Komfort 26x1.95 street tires on my wife's bike and they're only 25.75" tall so you'll only be saving about two-tenths of an inch with 24x3 tires.

    You asked in one post about any possible safety issues. The only one I can think is if you do go with smaller 24x2 sized tires you'll be dropping the bottom bracket by about an inch over the 26" wheels and you'll be much more likely to have pedal strikes when cornering or going over small obstacles. A pedal strike at the wrong time can cause a crash or cause some nice scars on your shin. If you're lucky it may be nothing more than just a reminder to be more careful going around a tight turn.
    Thank you, for the reply i was not aware of that big of a sidewall change.

    If the 24x3 wheel is very close to the 26x1.95 seems that the 24x3 will benefit alot from the extra sidewall, and pedal strike will be equal on both.

    I will start looking at different tires and now I am considering the 26in wheels because of the obsticle of finding a 24in rim that will work with disc brakes.

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    Thank you for everyones advice, I have decided to hold off on the 24in wheels. I will use the 26in wheels for testing.

    I have also purchased some GIANT S-XC2 rims (no hubs or spokes) i bought them from a friend for $20 both. I will be using this to teach myself how to build wheels.

    I will be building the bike this weekend, my plan is friday start, saturday finish and sunday test ride.

    I have ordered

    Cheng Shin C1096 Semi-Slick XC Bicycle Tire (Wire Bead, 26" x 1.90", Black)
    Avenir Bicycle Tube Schrader Valve - 26 x 1.90-2.125 Inch
    Sunlite Bicycle Folding Pedals, 9/16 in, pair

    Which will come in next week so next weekend i will be installing does things I will post pictures for the progress. Still looking at what helmet to buy.

  26. #26
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    If you going to be transporting your bike with the rear wheel off make a dummy rear hub. Use a old rear axle hub and cogset. You put this dummy rear hub in your rear dropouts when the rear wheel in not on the bike. The cogs will support the chain and keep the chain from greasing up the inside of your car. When you get home you can just hang the frame up and store the wheels seperately.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbeer View Post
    If you going to be transporting your bike with the rear wheel off make a dummy rear hub. Use a old rear axle hub and cogset. You put this dummy rear hub in your rear dropouts when the rear wheel in not on the bike. The cogs will support the chain and keep the chain from greasing up the inside of your car. When you get home you can just hang the frame up and store the wheels seperately.
    This is one of the reasons I wanted to avoid removing the rear wheel, i want to have the least amount of setup time as possible.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by lmp1054 View Post
    The OD of a 24in wheel is ~24in the OD of a 26in wheel is ~26in. 24x3 tire is 24in tall and 3in wide. a 26x2.x is 26in tall and 2.xin wide. The farthest points on the bike is reduced by two inches (one inch decrease on each end)
    Acctually 26in wheels are 22" in diameter and a 24in wheel would be 20" in diameter. It depends what tires you are using to get the true OD of the wheel plus tire.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by brent878 View Post
    Acctually 26in wheels are 22" in diameter and a 24in wheel would be 20" in diameter. It depends what tires you are using to get the true OD of the wheel plus tire.
    How is that? when i buy a tire it says 26x3 meaning 26in OD and 3in width why would it be missed labled?

  30. #30
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    brent is right. A 26' rim measures about 22". RidingSF is right to say that a 24" rim witha higher profile tire, will be very close to a 26" wheel witha lower profile tire. Either way, It takes about 10-20 seconds to remove or put on a rear wheel with QR, so why would you wanna spend the time and effort to buy and build a 24" wheel, be limited by tire choice, change your bikes intended geometry, have wheel that's worse at rolling over stuff, ect. All so it MIGHT be able to fit a bit better in your trunk. What if you get another car? I always love it when people think outside "the box" but really, just get a QR 26" rear and let's move on.
    Round and round we go

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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    brent is right. A 26' rim measures about 22". Imp is right to say that a 24" rim witha higher profile tire, will be very close to a 26" wheel witha lower profile tire. Either way, It takes about 10-20 seconds to remove or put on a rear wheel with QR, so why would you wanna spend the time and effort to buy and build a 24" wheel, be limited by tire choice, change your bikes intended geometry, have wheel that's worse at rolling over stuff, ect. All so it MIGHT be able to fit a bit better in your trunk. What if you get another car? I always love it when people think outside "the box" but really, just get a QR 26" rear and let's move on.
    See thats were we differ. I am not a avid bike rider. So i do not understand the pros and cons of 26in wheels against 24in wheels. I have not heard anything other then 24in wheel is harder to build and will cause my bottom bracket or peddles hit the ground. I stated that i will be using this bike with semi slick tires so i will not be ridding in terrain were these things could be a problem.

    Wheels = Rim + Tire

    This is why I do not understand why these wheels are called 26in wheels if they are not 26in

  32. #32
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    Guess your right. We differ. When I don't know something, and ask people who do, and everyone tells me the same thing, I'd listen.
    And now you know a few reasons
    Lower ground clearance
    less availabilty of rims and tires
    not much differance in size for fiting in trunk
    change bikes geo
    time riding instead of buying and building wheels
    Round and round we go

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by lmp1054 View Post
    This is why I do not understand why these wheels are called 26in wheels if they are not 26in
    It's just naming convention. 26" is the rough outer diameter of the tire, after being mounted on the rim and inflated. Wider tires end up being taller as well. Bicycle tires do not have sizing standards like car and motorcycle tires.

    The road standard of tires is a skinny tire mounted on a very large rim. We call these 700c tires/wheels (metric measurement, 700mm). In reality the outer diameter of a 700c tire, when mounted and inflated, is very similar to that of a 26". You just choose to have a large rim/skinny tire or smaller rim/fat tire.

    Go find a local Houston bicycle cooperative and hang out, volunteer, and you'll learn a lot more about working on bikes than reading threads on the internet. Get your hands on a bunch of different bikes and setups and you'll pick up a lot of knowledge.
    Here's one: Workshop Houston - http://www.workshophouston.org/programs/bike-shop/

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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    It's just naming convention. 26" is the rough outer diameter of the tire, after being mounted on the rim and inflated. Wider tires end up being taller as well. Bicycle tires do not have sizing standards like car and motorcycle tires.

    The road standard of tires is a skinny tire mounted on a very large rim. We call these 700c tires/wheels (metric measurement, 700mm). In reality the outer diameter of a 700c tire, when mounted and inflated, is very similar to that of a 26". You just choose to have a large rim/skinny tire or smaller rim/fat tire.

    Go find a local Houston bicycle cooperative and hang out, volunteer, and you'll learn a lot more about working on bikes than reading threads on the internet. Get your hands on a bunch of different bikes and setups and you'll pick up a lot of knowledge.
    Here's one: Workshop Houston - http://www.workshophouston.org/programs/bike-shop/
    Thank you, one of the reason i want to build this bike myself is for a little more experience in the process. I have ditched the Idea of 24in wheels since now I understand that wheel sizes veries so much....

    This information about tire size has me questioning the previous advice i received about 24in wheels will give me problems with a lower bottom bracket, since 24in wheels with wide tires are the same diameter as 26in wheels with normal width.

    I will start looking at Tire selection for the extra space I need.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Guess your right. We differ. When I don't know something, and ask people who do, and everyone tells me the same thing, I'd listen.
    And now you know a few reasons
    Lower ground clearance
    less availabilty of rims and tires
    not much differance in size for fiting in trunk
    change bikes geo
    time riding instead of buying and building wheels
    If i took peoples advice about the lower ground clearence, and did not continue to press the question i would have not know that i could gain the clearance i needed by chooicing the right tire.

    I enjoy working with my hands (built my desk, built my computer, do my own car maintance etc) so the advice i was receiving about it being to much work, didnt influence me.

  36. #36
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    I dont think the geo change will be all that different but you will have a lower bottom bracket for sure. While the stationary diameters will be similar, in the real world a fatter tire will squish more and that will lower your BB a bit.

    I'd say the main argument against 24" wheels is difficulty finding tires and price. You can get takeoff 26" disc wheels for nothing, if you go 24" disc wheels you'll have to go custom and build a set yourself. You wont really gain extra trunk space.

    QR wheels are so easy to remove and install that it should be a non-issue. If you have a QR seatpost, take a file and make a notch at the correct seatpost height so you can quickly slide your seatpost in to the correct height. Shouldnt take you even 5 minutes to put both wheels and the seatpost on the bike and be ready to ride.

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    Thank you guys for all your help i am now very confident in starting my bike build.

    With all the feedback i have been able to find a better solution then my idea of a 24in wheel.

    One of my concerns is, when I was heavier I road my brothers Giant Roadbike. It had very skiny tires. I actually ended up poping one of the tubes.

    So the things i want with this bike other then being able to fit in my trunk is being able to support my 265lb body.

    Some of the recomend weight on some bikes i am either a few pound over or at the max. I know with high performance bikes, they are meant for athletic riders so i high performance has not been my priority.

    Thank you all for your feedback it has been very useful I hope to post pictures of atleast the part i have later this afternoon. And i will post pictures of my build

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    Quote Originally Posted by lmp1054 View Post
    How is that? when i buy a tire it says 26x3 meaning 26in OD and 3in width why would it be missed labled?
    ya I know its confusing. I really didn't know about it till I started building my 29" bike and started looking at wheel sizes more carefully. But if you go to a bike shop and look at a 26x2.5" tire on a wheel inflated and look at something like a 26x1.5" slick on a wheel inflated you will quickly see that the OD are very different even though they both say 26". I was just pointing that out so you could maybe choose smaller tires on the 26" instead of going to a 24" with big tires. But up to you, just giving you more choices. And I like you hate taking my back wheel off my bike. Even with QR its a pain because you have the dirty chain to deal with, escpially if I am putting it in my car.

    Also another option is to get a folding frame so you can store it in your trunk. You are doing it for exercise and aren't doing any crazy trails so I think a folding frame bike might work out to your advantage. Some you don't even need to take the front wheel off.






  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by brent878 View Post
    ya I know its confusing. I really didn't know about it till I started building my 29" bike and started looking at wheel sizes more carefully. But if you go to a bike shop and look at a 26x2.5" tire on a wheel inflated and look at something like a 26x1.5" slick on a wheel inflated you will quickly see that the OD are very different even though they both say 26". I was just pointing that out so you could maybe choose smaller tires on the 26" instead of going to a 24" with big tires. But up to you, just giving you more choices. And I like you hate taking my back wheel off my bike. Even with QR its a pain because you have the dirty chain to deal with, escpially if I am putting it in my car.

    Also another option is to get a folding frame so you can store it in your trunk. You are doing it for exercise and aren't doing any crazy trails so I think a folding frame bike might work out to your advantage. Some you don't even need to take the front wheel off.





    I was thinking about the folding bike.... but i know i will get it stolen. The bike I am building total cost is going to be about $100 (not including tools) so if it gets stolen it will be frustrating but it wont be $599 frustrating. (i live in downtown houston... getting your bike stolen is just a way of life...)

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    Here are pictures of what I currently have (please excuse the mess, i have not cleaned out my garage in awhile.)

    The huffy bike i took apart and put back together minus the seat.

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/zDXNvwD3Q_uwdjMlNh9pkQ?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-TlOHfkRwbtQ/Th4j1s5AtZI/AAAAAAAAAE4/sQNrwOravxk/s640/2011-07-13%25252017.41.12.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    Here is the motobecane frame I bought from craiglist the frame was painted like that when i bought it.
    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/9cf2CH7IWeAcBK-DtFX6tA?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-h3PVStL23wo/Th4lM-o4pAI/AAAAAAAAAE8/Uk_DZkiG9hs/s640/2011-07-13%25252017.40.58.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

    This is the donor bike, i was not able to get the schwin bike because the owner wanted to much for it, i bought this huffy black widow bike
    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/lyCUxY6B2lpCWXnvXMyTYQ?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-5NCf6cUSNAk/Th4hFqW6ndI/AAAAAAAAAFM/MUI-w4jYnsw/s640/2011-07-13%25252017.42.11.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>

  41. #41
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    stories like these that keep me from getting a quick release rear tire

    Look what happened to me ....

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by lmp1054 View Post
    stories like these that keep me from getting a quick release rear tire

    Look what happened to me ....
    Please ignore this post. A properly set up quick release clamps stronger than any bolt on axle. Especially since you'll be actively taking the wheels on and off.

    I'd bet the poster from that thread hadnt checked his quick releases in a few weeks and probably had them on the wrong side of the bike. If you're running disc brakes, the lever should be on the opposite side of the hub as heat from the caliper can cause the lever to loosen up over time.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    If you're running disc brakes, the lever should be on the opposite side of the hub as heat from the caliper can cause the lever to loosen up over time.
    I didn't know this, thank you. I never considered heat from disc brakes to be a factor and I've always run my levers on the non-drive side. I run v-brakes now. But, will keep this in mind in the future.

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    Didnt realize it would come out looking this ugly, but i like it. VERY LIGHT. I can easily carry it any monuver it with one hand.

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/RWby5POBXxtYoGPnntJfIQ?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-6f7ZZHV7g8M/TiBwndGXMfI/AAAAAAAAAFU/uLUQTocR4AE/s640/2011-07-15%25252011.50.46.jpg" height="480" width="640" /></a>


    I need special tools to remove the bottom end, waiting on that then its just some new pedals, and grips and I'm off. Also this is just a mock up i havent tightend or connected anything up including the derailers

    It is a little to high for me, not the most comfertable situation standing over the top tube....

    Future plans. I have in my garage Giant aluminum rims and a 8 gear cassete, thinking about building a new set of weels and updating the bike from 21spd to 24spd not sure if that will improve anything but i enjoyed putting the bike together.

  45. #45
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    Looking very nice! I love wrenching on my bike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by marpilli View Post
    Looking very nice! I love wrenching on my bike.
    I think i will end up being one of does people that spend more time building there bike up... then actually ridding it lol

    I think the over all ugliness of the bike will make it a natural theft deterent and if some does steal it, i will have a better chance of finding it.

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    Hey guys,

    Duing some research on the tire size, and found out that the largest 26in wheels available are 599mm which happen to be the size of wheels i have on my bike. The smallest 26in wheels are 559 mm which is 1.6inches smaller. (also the largest 24in wheel is 547 mm) will be looking into this size of wheel

  48. #48
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    Found a use for the old huffy bike, i'm thinking of building something witht he old donor bike,

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/285css0vanGUr2na0boohw?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-ZVQLpn24kjM/TiD5RY3A8qI/AAAAAAAAAFo/FxvevxyoVps/s640/2011-07-15%25252021.16.24.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/B7-iJUV296r2ISGZ2Rer6A?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-bc0CDvy4Y-I/TiD3AKzBDPI/AAAAAAAAAFk/eTg8Va71SAg/s640/2011-07-15%25252021.16.14.jpg" height="640" width="480" /></a>

  49. #49
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    Get a nice smooth tire for the spinner. Do you really pedal that while the weather's nice?
    Round and round we go

  50. #50
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    lol nice weather is anything below 100degrees so we havent had nice weather for the past month....

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