1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    48

    Will wider tires fit on my rim or does rim also need to be changed?

    I am just learning all the parts of my mtn bike. My wheels are 1.95. I would eventually like to beef them up a bit. My front rim says ALEX MX18 and my back rim is just silver with no branding anywhere. Both tires have 26x1.95. To go with a wider tire do I also need to get wider rims?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    What could go wrong ...
    Reputation: Zoke2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,932
    "Both tires have 26x1.95. To go with a wider tire do I also need to get wider rims?"

    No, you can run any 26" tire
    I used to ride to Win ... Now I ride to Grin

    While my guitar gently weeps, my bike sits there mocking me

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    10,971
    Quote Originally Posted by smac75 View Post
    I am just learning all the parts of my mtn bike. My wheels are 1.95. I would eventually like to beef them up a bit. My front rim says ALEX MX18 and my back rim is just silver with no branding anywhere. Both tires have 26x1.95. To go with a wider tire do I also need to get wider rims?

    Thanks!
    The rims are not the problem.....you can difinately run wider tires...

    Probably somewhere around 2.35 inch the rear tire will start getting to big to easily remove the rear wheel, cause the tire will hit the frame.

  4. #4
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    11,772
    You can certainly put bigger tyres on ALEX MX18. Something like 2.2" or 2.3" should be fine.

    The other question is: will a fatter tyre fit in your frame and fork.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    13
    what would be the purpose of a thicker tire?better traction!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    48
    Thank you for the answers. I am going to look into some beefier tires. Any recs? I do mostly single-track, semi-technical, rocky and rooty.

  7. #7
    My little friends
    Reputation: EABiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    302
    I ride technical rocky and rooty trails and Kenda Nevegals have treated me well.

  8. #8
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    11,772
    Quote Originally Posted by cplfreakyd View Post
    what would be the purpose of a thicker tire?better traction!
    More traction and more stability, especially over rocks and roots.

    Also, a fatter tyre can be run at lower pressure which helps traction and can make the ride smoother.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    48
    forgot to mention...I have tubeless on there right now so the kenda's mentioned above probably would work right? No harm in switching over to tubed though I guess. But I do like the idea of tubeless. So maybe some recs for good tubeless tires?

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jetboy23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,019
    I don't think that rim is a tubeless rim. I'm not really into the conversions because the bead seat on rims that aren't UST just aren't built for tubeless settup. Yes, they may work. Yes, a lot of ppl have no problems running a tubeless conversion. Yes, conversions have failed with very painfull results. Thats why i run tubes. I probably won't go UST until they increase the tire options for that system.

    As for tires, is your location a wet one? Do you rail corners on downhills and blow through the chunk or are you more of an XC type that enjoys climbing and rolls through the technical sections? I'm more of the XC/Trail type of rider and live in SoCal with not much wet. I really like the Ikon 2.2 for faster hardpack or Ardent 2.4 for all around trail riding up front. On the rear i like WTB Mutano 2.4, Geax AKA 2.2, and Schwalbe Racing Ralph 2.25. I really think Ardent front and Ikon rear would be great for my riding.

    Every rider likes different tire characteristics though. Hard to recommend one tire.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    13
    Really depends on the type of terrain you'll be riding on and how you'll be riding on it.

    Smoother tires for smoother terrain. Knobby tires for rough/slick/muddy. Knobbier are more versatile but smoother are faster. Fatter tires only increase your grip.

    Here's a good link that explains tire choices.


    rei.com/expertadvice/articles/bike+tires.html
    scratches and dents show character on the bike or rider

  12. #12
    Newbie to Mountain Biking
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    30
    Chainstays and seatstays come into quesTion when you up tire sizes

  13. #13
    CSC
    CSC is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    253
    Remember that by increasing tire width will also increase flex, i.e, as you turn at high speeds, the tire tread will tend to roll out a bit, sometimes enough to make contact with the frame or components (I had WTB Prowler SS's, and if the back got too soft, it could rub my front derailleur. Great tires, though...too bad they stopped making them). Decreasing tire PSI will also add to this issue.

    That being said, 2.3 should be fine...though a 2.2 will get you basically the same functionality, with less weight. I am really enjoying my Specialized "The Captain" tires...though they pack with snow sometimes. Stick to everything like glue, and these are the bottom end ones, so I imagine that the dual-compound ones would be even better!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    10

    Similar Question

    I'm looking to run the widest and best tires I can fit on the bike.
    Is the fit entirely dependent on the frame or will some tires be too wide at the bead to fit in my rims?
    I currently run 2.25 tires on tubeless Stan's ZTR Flow 29er rims (with tubes, because the free tires were tube-only). At the point that these tires wear out, I'm looking to actually take advantage of a tubeless tire that's as wide as possible to hopefully make up for my mtb being completely rigid.

    To my knowledge (what I can find on the company's website) tire clearance for the fork is 87 mm (3.4 inches?!) and for the frame is ~2.3 inches. At what point is a tire too wide for a 29er rim?

  15. #15
    CSC
    CSC is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    253
    Quote Originally Posted by as2003 View Post
    I'm looking to run the widest and best tires I can fit on the bike.
    Is the fit entirely dependent on the frame or will some tires be too wide at the bead to fit in my rims?
    I currently run 2.25 tires on tubeless Stan's ZTR Flow 29er rims (with tubes, because the free tires were tube-only). At the point that these tires wear out, I'm looking to actually take advantage of a tubeless tire that's as wide as possible to hopefully make up for my mtb being completely rigid.

    To my knowledge (what I can find on the company's website) tire clearance for the fork is 87 mm (3.4 inches?!) and for the frame is ~2.3 inches. At what point is a tire too wide for a 29er rim?
    Well, the difference between a 26" rim and a 29" rim is only diameter...the mechanics of how the tire is attached is the same. Beads fit into a grove on either inside-edge of the wheel body. Now, I would be curious to know what size of tire the original "free" ones were...are they the 2.25?

    If so, I would be very confident in going to 2.3, and beyond. I suspect that, unless the frame is a lot more burly than I think it is, you will run into a size limit on your rear wheel. And the frame is kind of like the absolute size limit, not the useable size limit, as my above comment touches on. Tires flex, and the larger they are, the more so. You may find that the tires will flex and grind along components (my case was the front derailleur in low gears and an old kickstand).

    There is no sure-fire way to know what size of tire will do this...could be that a 2.35 will flex less than a 2.3. I know this is sort of a "non-answer", but tires are not a concrete science

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •