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  1. #1
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    Who works on their own bikes and who takes them to the LBS?

    Who works on their own bikes and who takes them to the LBS?-old-rusty-bike-big-900x597.jpg
    Today we’re going to talk about the guy that owns this bike, the scourge of the professional bicycle mechanic. A man that doesn’t care what happens to his bike or his mother. A godless man who tips 4% and eats the last cookie without even asking.
    The most uninterested man in the world.
    He doesn’t always clean his bike, but when he does, he throws it in the ocean and waits for it to wash back to shore.

    I want to make a case for working on your own bike. At least give it a try!

    I jotted down some other reasons in a recent blog article, you can find it here if you feel like an informational laugh.

    Keep the rubber side down! Cheers!

  2. #2
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    Definitely a good article...those reasons are among the reasons I started learning maintenance myself, which ultimately led to being a shop mechanic. I think everyone who rides should learn at least basic maintenance...or at the very least clean and take care of their bike so it doesn't end up like the one above.

    It's a bit of a double edged sword, though. If everyone learned how to fully maintain their bikes, a lot of shops would go out of business and there would be less bike mechanics out there. Even so, I still teach bike repair clinics and allow customers watch what I'm doing if I'm not swamped.

  3. #3
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    Re: Who works on their own bikes and who takes them to the LBS?

    The thread title is misleading.

    Anyways, I clean my own bike. Any work that requires specialty tools or skills, I have the bike shop do it for me.

    For now, the only technical work I can do is fix a flat tire. My local shop has to do the cable adjustments and fork maintenance for me.
    What works for me may not work for you. What's best for you depends on many factors. We are different from each other.

  4. #4
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    One of my first jobs was at a LBS that was a few blocks away from my house when I was in HS. Back then, it was about BMX bikes so it wasn't anything tough at first, but then I started learning about 10 speeds and then started working on those. So I've always worked on my own bikes, unless its truing a wheel, then I'd bring it into a shop. Half my garage is my bike work area with two workstands. I work on all my friend's bikes as well. These days, there isn't much you can't learn to do with a bike that isn't on Youtube. All you need are the tools which I invested in to save me money. I do all the oil and seal changes on my fork (Fox). Seal changes in my RP23. For me, its also a way to escape from the family. I go downstairs, turn on the radio and its just my bikes and I.

  5. #5
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    I've been on an mtb for two years. I make a living fixing stuff and I'm a tool hog. I work on my bike myself for the most part. If I'm having trouble diagnosing a weird problem I'll run by the lbs. Last time they helped me figure out a problem I fixed it in their shop on their stand with their tools.
    I buy any tools I need from them, and most of my parts too. Keeps them going, and it's cheaper for me.
    The only thing I have yet to tackle is fork service....maybe soon.

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  6. #6
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    Buy most of my tools and parts from the LBS, but prefer to do the work myself. No better way to know your bike. I do all the cabling, wheel truing,and other stuff, and have built a bike or two from the frame up. I enjoy the experience.

  7. #7
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    I do almost all the work myself. I will rebuild my dropper post, I have rebuilt forks and shocks, wheel truing, cleaning, etc. It saves a lot of money and I really like to tinker on thing.

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  8. #8
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    Who works on their own bikes and who takes them to the LBS?

    I'm a pretty big n00b still but I started small (chain lubing) and have worked my way up to installing some parts and taking stuff apart. I really enjoy learning about the bike and look forward to learning more in the future. My wife bought me a repair stand for Xmas and it made life 100x better!

  9. #9
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    All me with exception of my pf30. I think I will by the removal tool next time around and fab up a press...then again...at this point I may spring for a Park press and just be done with it...it will last a lifetime.

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  10. #10
    I Tried Them ALL... Moderator
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    I do 90% of work myself EXCEPT:

    1) Wheel truing and tensioning(leave it to the PROS)
    2) Disc brake bleeds
    3) Bottom bracket/headset installs
    4) Tubeless sealant(hate the mess/fuss)
    "The ONLY person who needs to race.....is the entrant"

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    I do 90% of work myself EXCEPT:
    Make that 97% since its all so easy after the first time or so.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    1) Wheel truing and tensioning(leave it to the PROS)
    Agreed. This rarely is required, so, i will give it a 2% since i have yet to need it in the 3yrs of riding (weekend warrior).

    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    2) Disc brake bleeds
    I found i do just as good a job as the shop.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    3) Bottom bracket/headset installs
    Exteranal BB, square taper, or EBB. All super easy to install. Headsets even using a large bolt and washers. No problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    4) Tubeless sealant(hate the mess/fuss)
    I can run tubes at 24psi and don't trust a tubeless front in case of a burp at speed. So, N/A.

    I will add the additional 1% that i use a shop for is for when i may need to service my fork. I've done all of my Rockshox service and modifications, but, i just bought a Manitou Marvel and it may be more complicated. So, 1% just because i "might" have to take it in if i can't figure it out.

    Honestly, youtube, Park, and Pinkbike have about every video i've needed to learn to do all of my own work. Tools almost pay for themselves after about the first time you use them.

  12. #12
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    My first half of tools are Park Tools because that was just the shop standard. But I've figured out that some of the cheaper brands work just as well, especially if you don't use them that much but just need to have one just in case. I found Spin Doctors make some pretty good stuff (Performance stuff) and I bought a set for like $40 with pretty much everything I need. My headset press works on press fit bottom brackets. Buying tools was like buying parts for me. I just got addicted and just had to have them.

  13. #13
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    Who works on their own bikes and who takes them to the LBS?

    I maintain, build, repair almost everything in my life from my cars to my phone. The exception being my furnace. Always breaks when I have to go to work. Furnace guy fixes when I'm gone. The biggest advantage for me is not having to wait for someone else to fix my stuff. My shop has every thing from an engine hoist to precision screw drivers needed to repair electronic devices. In my opinion, you are always money and time ahead tacking a new skill and learning it. My exception to this would probably be welding. My buddies that do this as a profession always lay a nicer bead with better penetration then I can and I have other skills to trade for their time. BTW I do not come from mechanical parents, I just chose to learn how to fix my own stuff after mechanics screwed up my car a couple times. I figured I couldn't do any worse and I was right.


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  14. #14
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    I do 90% of work myself EXCEPT:

    1) Wheel truing and tensioning(leave it to the PROS)
    2) Disc brake bleeds
    3) Bottom bracket/headset installs
    4) Tubeless sealant(hate the mess/fuss)
    Sounds familiar.

    1) Wheel truing and tensioning -- Even at my weight, my wheels are overkill and rarely need truing. Apparently, it is not all that hard, after you spend some time patiently learning it.

    2) Disc brake bleeds -- Should be easy but I rarely need it and haven't bothered to try it.

    3) Bottom bracket/headset installs -- BB installation itself is easy - but I get the facing and chasing done at a shop. Cannot justify buying the tools for a job that needs to be done just once for a frame. While they are at it, I let them put on the headset and shorten the steerer.

    4) Tubeless sealant(hate the mess/fuss) -- Still running tubes.....

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  15. #15
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    I do most all of the stuff on my bikes. Something like facing a bottom bracket tube I'll take to the shop because I don't want to buy the tool that I may seldom ever use (so far had one done in all my years of riding). Everything else I do. Working on cars and motorcycles all my life leaves bicycles being pretty simple items.
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  16. #16
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    I have only taken my bike to the LBS once. I was trying to take off the fork on my road bike and when I jerked the fork out of the frame, the headset "exploded" and went flying into different directions. I had no idea how to put it back together. LBS put it together for like $10.

    I have not had to mess with the BB yet, but when the time comes, I might have to take the bike to the LBS. I don't have the tools and I heard they are expensive.

  17. #17
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    the only time I have ever paid anyone to work on my bike was when I had a bmx wheel built with a freecoaster hub when I was 15. otherwise, I build my own wheels, service my own suspension, and everything else. it helps that I work in a bike shop, but if i didn't I would have to visit a bike co-op or just build up my own tool kit.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    I do 90% of work myself EXCEPT:

    1) Wheel truing and tensioning(leave it to the PROS)
    2) Disc brake bleeds
    3) Bottom bracket/headset installs
    4) Tubeless sealant(hate the mess/fuss)
    Pretty much this. I'm looking to upgrade my fork soon but I'll probably have my LBS do the install.

  19. #19
    29ers Forever
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    I have done everything to my bike except for the first (and only) tune up, and the crankset.

  20. #20
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    Re: Who works on their own bikes and who takes them to the LBS?

    I vary. I don't have as much time on my hands as I'd like to anymore. That happened before I needed my first brake bleed. So I've never bled my brakes or rebuilt a modern fork. I've done pretty much everything else, but have started dropping my mountain bikes at the shop once a year. They do a better job than I care to. I think a thorough tuneup once a year is helpful.

    Routine stuff, I do myself. Quicker than a shop run.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  21. #21
    local trails rider
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    Oh yes... suspension components... I've seen the face of a guy who put the circlips in the wrong way during fork reassembly ... and didn't stop when he lost damping

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  22. #22
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    100% myself incl building wheels.

  23. #23
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    Is he talking about maintaining your bike or actually fixing/repairing/tuning the bike? I'm a noob but I take great care of my new machine cleaning it regularly, expecially after muddy rides, cleaning and re lubing the drivetrain regularly. Obviously I maintain the tyre air pressure and set the shock to the appropriate psi/sag etc. That's all pretty basic of course as is fixing a flat when it occurs. So I'm not like the guy in the article that let's his bike become a rusted out wreck but I'm also not 'wrenching' on my own bike either. I leave the fine tuning to the professionals because:

    a. I don't have the tools to do it and, more importantly
    b. I don't know what I am doing.

    I'd rather let the professionals fine tune my bike so I can enjoy riding it. Plus good bikes are expensive. I don't want to damage the bikes or void the warranty by say servicing the forks myself and screwing it up.

    The only tinkering I have done is adjusting the cockpit by moving the seat back and forth and trying different size stems, spacers and flipping the stem to adjust the fit. Oh and putting new pedals on.

    Since my bike is still relatively new it hasn't needed much maintenance yet but when I need the brakes bled, derailleurs tuned, fork serviced etc I'll get the LBS to do it for me.

  24. #24
    No one calls me Maurice.
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    I've been doing about 97% for the last 30 years. Admittedly, hydraulic disc brakes and I were not friends at first and suspension forks and I have had a falling out. I built my first wheelset in 1979 and have done dozens since without a truing stand (but I do own a dial indicator) or tension meter (although that would be a great next tool). I don't face my head tubes or BBs myself because it's just more economical to have that done with the proper tools and they cost a bit and I have my fork done by an LBS (to save on the amount of damage I cause during disassembly). Their are pros and cons to each school of thought (do it yourself or have it done) ultimately, you should have a good grasp on the fundamentals (adjusting ders and brakes, lube, minor adjustment) and a working knowledge of diagnosing issues so you can avoid more serious stuff by being preventive. I find people broken down all the time and I'll teach anyone how to get underway themselves but I never "take-over" the repair and do it myself. You gotta learn somehow.

  25. #25
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    I wrench my own bike, most of the time I'd swapped parts just for fun(rainy day)because I have most of the tools do get the job done but I have to agree with Zachariah on a few things I'd rather have the LBS do. Headset and tubeless is not so bad I do that all the time on my own. I definitely don't like to face stuff, it's dusty and messy.

  26. #26
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    I try and learn to do routine maintenance. Things that are typically one time things that require specialized tools that would cost more than taking it to the LBS would, I'd take to the LBS or I would usually find a friend that has such tools and experience and offer them the payment (sometimes in food or drink, or whatever). Things such as facing brake tabs, head tubes, RD hanger alignment, etc. When I find I need to do it again, I would consider getting a tool to do it myself. Things that frustrate me, I would take to a mechanic, especially since it's cheaper than outright replacing parts that aren't functioning to my satisfaction.

    Generally, the LBS seem to be full of bikes that they've sold and offer "free tune-ups" on. The waiting time is rather long. I've worked on jets and autos before, so I'm not uninitiated nor afraid. Just a matter of getting tools and sharping your senses to know what makes the bike work better or worse. Typically, doing it yourself takes a lot of time, but you get to know your bike really well and are able to troubleshoot your own bike better than someone who would need to work off of your description and make a guess according to patterns they've seen. Wouldn't call myself a "pro" unless I was able to do all my fixes in no time at all. Honestly, I do most my fine tuning on the trail itself... tuning gears and rubbing brakes, pressures in tire and suspension, tweaking fit, getting the stem aligned straight with the front wheel...

    BTW, what's a Fred? I wonder if I'm one. I spend lots of money on bikes and my skills are bad. One reason I buy high end parts is because the cheaper stuff quickly ends up feeling bad, probably due to my amateur-level maintenance, and the nicer stuff lasts longer and performs more consistently with less maintenance.

  27. #27
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    Like so many others I do almost everything on my bike and have been doing that for 25+ years.

    Everyone should be to do routine maintenance on his/her bike, but from all the years on a road bike I can tell there is a major difference in maintenance between road and mountain.

    If a person rides road in good weather you can pretty much get away with letting your LBS do the work because you can go a lot of miles without needing to do much more than putting air in the tires. Big difference when you start to ride in dirt water and mud.

    John

  28. #28
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    Though no longer my career Im a certified auto mechanic. Plus grew up with a father that spent time as one then industrial maint. So we rarely took anything anywhere for repairs. And im the same way. Have plenty of tools as I do work on cars for friends and family still. Just had to buy bike specific tools and take the time to tear down and rebuild my previous and my current bike. Help of vids/forums so I didn't screw anything up and to learn proper tuning techniques.

    As for going to lbs. I buy my parts from my trek shop mostly. Tools I had bought offline when I owned previous bike (WalMart bike). Lbs is great for not charging me full retail but still above online pricing usually by a few dollars. Warranty work goes to him, or if im stumped/dont have the tool (expensive specialty stuff) then pay him to fix it.

    I'm on a budget so gotta watch costs but anytime Im out to spend money on my bike/gear I check with him before buying so I can support him whenever possible.

    Wrench on ur own bike but be sure to show ur lbs some love so they are still im business for years to come, and there when u do need them.



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  29. #29
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    I work on all my own bikes, cars and house. I was brought up to fix it yourself and if you don't know how learn. Working on bikes started when I was a wee lad, we were pretty poor and couldn't afford a new bike or even a used one for that matter. So I used to go out on spring clean up days around here that means you can toss out all your crap on the curb and the garbage men will pick it up once in the spring. I used to go out and grab all the tossed out bikes, didn't matter 10 speed or BMX and that was about it back then. I started to build bikes back then with what ever I had and it just stayed with me. My tools back then consisted of two screw drivers a pair of vise grips, adjustable wrench and a hammer and I could build an entire bike with these tools, some of it wasn't pretty but hey as a kid and you just built a bike.

    Today I still work on and build my own bikes for the most part, have all the right tools now, no more Frankensteining my bikes. As for my LBS I have spent about 7 k at my fav LBS over the last 3 years so I still support them as much as I can.
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  30. #30
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    Do all my own wrenching, to me that is called "tinker time". When you are not riding quality time. Did buy a truing stand(most expensive tool) since broke a couple of spokes and pretty simple to put new ones in. Did the fork seals and fluid changes, no big deal. It's a bike, I can resell the tools at 50-80% of my cost. The main thing for me, do not need to make a trip to LBS, more time efficient to take 10minutes to adjust the linkage vs the driving, guaranteed 10min anywhere, to LBS, and pay them.

  31. #31
    Kitty! Kitty! Kitty!
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    Wouldn't mind doing my own wrenching, but I dont trust myself yet. I've tinkered with truing and basic PM and cleaning, but I won't do suspension stuff yet. Although I think my recon is set to 80mm right now and I want to open it up and see... Just nervous I'll get into a situation and have to take a bunch of parts and a non-functioning bike to the lbs. My lbs offers free lifetime tunes if you buy the bike from them, which is cool. It's close to my house... Why not take it in for a free tune and ogle some merch?

  32. #32
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    Good post, agree you should keep your bike clean and lubed, agree about the misleading title, maybe consider changing it. Article has good points, beginners should take heed, Park Tools is an excellent resource for service/repair. Your 7 Essential tips is very road bike specific, should consider differentiating between road and MTB and give suggestions for both disciplines - i.e. never seen an MTB chain last more than 1200 miles when ridden off road, let alone 2,500
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  33. #33
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    Only been riding for 6 months and I do everything myself. However, when the time comes for bottom bracket or headset, I'll probably pay my LBS just to avoid having to buy the expensive use-once-every-long-ass-time tools.

    In 6 months I've done all the basics like replacing a chain/cassette/chainring/brake pads//tire replacement, bled brakes, rebuilt suspension forks/shocks, wheel truing, set up tubeless, etc. Pretty much everything except BB/headset.

  34. #34
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    Honestly it is great to hear that this many people work on their own bikes. And from reading the posts it looks like it's not just the simple stuff either.

    Of course I realize that the individuals that responded are the proud mechanics among us and for every one response here, there are probably 10 more cyclists that don't do any work whatsoever on their bike.

    What do you guys think its the number one reason that cyclists don't work on their bikes?
    1. They lack the appropriate tools.
    2. They lack the appropriate knowledge.
    3. Fear that they might break something.
    4. Fear that they might do something incorrectly and end up hurting themselves when it fails.
    5. A general dislike for wrenching.
    6. Lack of time. It is learning a new skill, or skills, after all.
    Another reason...?

    I think that a lot of riders think that a bicycle mechanic performs miracles in a back room, completing procedures that are so complex that the average cyclists shouldn't even bother... this is how I feel about my car mechanic after all. Little do they know that bikes are actually pretty simple...


    What do you guys think might entice a new (or experienced rider) without mechanic skills to take the leap and start turning a wrench?

  35. #35
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    Who works on their own bikes and who takes them to the LBS?

    I used to be scared to work on my bike for 2 of the reasons you mentioned above:

    1. Lacking the knowledge.
    2. Fear I would break something.

    That's pretty much it. Now I just say fawk it and go for it. If I break something I'll upgrade.

  36. #36
    No one calls me Maurice.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bruceleader View Post
    Honestly it is great to hear that this many people work on their own bikes. And from reading the posts it looks like it's not just the simple stuff either.

    Of course I realize that the individuals that responded are the proud mechanics among us and for every one response here, there are probably 10 more cyclists that don't do any work whatsoever on their bike.

    What do you guys think its the number one reason that cyclists don't work on their bikes?
    1. They lack the appropriate tools.
    2. They lack the appropriate knowledge.
    3. Fear that they might break something.
    4. Fear that they might do something incorrectly and end up hurting themselves when it fails.
    5. A general dislike for wrenching.
    6. Lack of time. It is learning a new skill, or skills, after all.
    Another reason...?

    I think that a lot of riders think that a bicycle mechanic performs miracles in a back room, completing procedures that are so complex that the average cyclists shouldn't even bother... this is how I feel about my car mechanic after all. Little do they know that bikes are actually pretty simple...


    What do you guys think might entice a new (or experienced rider) without mechanic skills to take the leap and start turning a wrench?
    To be honest, I think the biggest impediment to doing your own wrenching is the perceived lack of necessity. We live in a society that generally depends on someone else in the event of an unforeseen mechanical failure (i.e. the car breaks on the road, we call a tow truck. the water heater leaks, we call a plumber. etc.). In some of those cases there may be a real logical argument against working on the item yourself. The middle of a blizzard is no time to learn how to replace your furnace blower. In the case of biking, and especially mountain biking, the odds of you having to deal with a mechanical failure or walkout are pretty good. Still, I passed two cyclists last Sunday who were walking out with flats because they couldn't change or didn't have a tube for their bike. With most LBS offering "Lifetime Adjustments" it's pretty easy to take your bike in and get the der adjusted but that doesn't help you if you're in the woods with a bent der hanger. Tools wise, if you have a decent multi tool (crankbros or similar), tire levers (if you need them) and pump, you can perform most adjustments and routine maintenance. I frequently "assist" folks on the trail with some adjustment but they do the work and learn. Like the saying goes "Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach him how to shoot and he won't have to eat fish."

  37. #37
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    I will never, ever let anyone else put a wrench on one of my bikes. There's been 4-5 times in the last 20 years I have, and the work was not done the way I would have. Building/truing wheels, suspension tuning, installing headsets, all things anyone can do as well as a bike shop if they chose to.
    Someone mentioned welding above; I guess that's my thing: welding or soldering or whatever, those require some skill and a steady hand that comes with practice, everything you need to do to work on a bike is tightening a screw.

    People I talk to that have shops do their work I'd say mostly are afraid to do it themselves; afraid they'll screw something up in such a way that it will be dangerous, yet they believe the minimum wage high school kid at the shop is infallible. I don't understand that. There's very little on a bike that if it's done wrong will cause a crash, and there's nothing that's hard to do right if you take a minute to think about what you're trying to accomplish.
    A lot of people I talk to say "I'm not very mechanical" and give up. That's another way of saying "I don't believe myself intelligent enough to learn how to do this." I guess if you're ok with that...

    and while we're on the subject; I do all my own wrenching, have "built" over a dozen bikes (I can't call hanging parts on a frame "building" anything, but that's what the kids say), done more component swaps, fork installs, wheel builds, tubeless installs... than I can count.
    And I have never in my life washed a bike. I don't see myself ever doing so either.

  38. #38
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
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    Re: Who works on their own bikes and who takes them to the LBS?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    Only been riding for 6 months and I do everything myself. However, when the time comes for bottom bracket or headset, I'll probably pay my LBS just to avoid having to buy the expensive use-once-every-long-ass-time tools.

    In 6 months I've done all the basics like replacing a chain/cassette/chainring/brake pads//tire replacement, bled brakes, rebuilt suspension forks/shocks, wheel truing, set up tubeless, etc. Pretty much everything except BB/headset.
    BB tools are necessary but cheap. I think it's worth owning the ones for cranks I actually have. If I'm getting a bottom bracket removed and plan to install something different, I'll pay the shop. Only costs me a few dollars more and I keep a little bit of additional clutter out of my life.

    Swapping a headset doesn't need anything special. Rubber mallet and a dowel. (You'd be shocked at how aerospace manufacturing is done.) Hammer and a screw driver can take care of the old crown race, and either a pipe with the right ID or the previously-mentioned mallet and dowel can get a new one on. Depends how expensive the fork and headset were.

    A lot of people make a headset press with a piece of allthread and some nuts and washers. But as long as you've got something solid to back it up, this is another task a mallet can handle. Or, you can use the top cap and the fork itself.

    I'm sure people will flame me for this. But, a lot of y'all are really precious about your gear.

    On a bit of a tangent, one of my obstacles is lack of a good workspace. It can make working on a bike incredibly irritating. Wouldn't it be great if there was a place set up to work on bikes? There could be tools there and people to answer my questions. Oh hell, I could just pay those people to fix my bike once I'm there anyway.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  39. #39
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
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    Come to think of it, one can often substitute vice grips for bottom bracket and lock ring tools. But they don't work that well and leave tool marks all over the place.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  40. #40
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    I do all repairs and maintenance, mainly because it is a bigger pain to take the bike in than it is to just fix it myself. When I was younger I was a gearhead and bikes are cake compared to cars.

    I went online and bought spares for all of the bearings on the bike. I've upgraded almost all the components on the bike, so I've got spare components for whatever breaks.

    If I break the frame I'm SOL. Otherwise if anything else breaks I should be able to get the bike rideable pretty quickly with the tools and parts in my garage.

  41. #41
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    The LBS I go to has great, not good mechanics. Not only that, I enjoy them as people and want the business to succeed. I have too many things I want to do with my time as it is, and while I worked on my bikes when I got into mountain biking in the mid 80's through maybe 10 years ago, I'm over enjoying spending my time working on the bike. Plus, frankly, my repairs didn't always bring the bike all the way back to what I would call "fully repaired", so over time, the little nagging things that were not quite right started to build up. As it is now, my bike rides every bit as good today as it did the day I bought it. And it is worth what it costs for that to be the case.

    I do a few things - I keep it clean and lubed, I replace the brake pads when needed, and I check all fittings to make sure everything is properly tightened. Pretty much anything beyond that and I take it to the shop. I can afford it, the work is done right, and I can spend my time riding my spare bike while the good bike is in the shop. Everyone wins.

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