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  1. #1
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    when to replace sealant for tubeless set-up

    I've read that it's probably a good idea to replace the sealant around once a year. It's been about that long for the sealant in my tires, but I feel like my situation is special and unique. I've only ridden it a handful of times over the past year, and I keep it stored indoors on a carpeted floor. Do the conventional rules about sealant replacement still apply to me in this case?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    All I can tell you is from my own experience, for what it's worth; I have only used Stan's sealant. In the past and I changed the sealant every six months. But as time goes by I have been going longer between sealant changes. This last time I have been running the same sealant for a second season. Going on a full year now. I may be pushing it but I don't care. I get tired at my old age with the sealant change proceedure and if I take to LBS, it cost me bucks that could go towards up grades on my bike. So, if you don't mind the risk of a bead blow out or no liquid left to fill a new pucture, then go longer between changes.

  3. #3
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    Around here the sealant dries up in a couple of months.Dried sealant = flats ,sealant is there to prevent flats.Stan's has a injector for the vavle stem ,remove the vavle core ,put in the sealant takes a minute. I use a old small plastic glue bottle that squirt into the vavle stem.

  4. #4
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    ^^^ This +1 using Stan's.
    Would rather add sealant every few months than to flat, and install a tube.
    Last tire I swapped over, had no flats, but found 8 thorns. If on trail all must be removed B4 installing a tube to avoid hike-a-bike time.
    Yes, occasionally, you may find one of these..

  5. #5
    Are you treadstone?
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    I guess this means I'm gonna have to add new sealant. But, from what I've read, I have to scrape out the old sealant first. Is that what you guys do?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sponger View Post
    I guess this means I'm gonna have to add new sealant. But, from what I've read, I have to scrape out the old sealant first. Is that what you guys do?
    Absolutely. Otherwise, it will build up over time.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by sponger View Post
    I guess this means I'm gonna have to add new sealant. But, from what I've read, I have to scrape out the old sealant first. Is that what you guys do?
    Not sure about the others, but I never have.
    Just pop one bead, remove any big boogers, re-add sealant, re-seat, and rock it till it's dead. When I swap tires, will rinse the sealant off with a hose, and scrub clean the rim and bead before mounting. In doing this, haven't had any issues seating a tire prior used tubeless.

  8. #8
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    I have always removed the residual coating of dry sealant by peeling it off. Not sure if any water that has got in or contact with dry sealant would make the new slime go off faster. I do mine 3 monthly or so.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyin_W View Post
    Not sure about the others, but I never have.
    Just pop one bead, remove any big boogers, re-add sealant, re-seat, and rock it till it's dead. When I swap tires, will rinse the sealant off with a hose, and scrub clean the rim and bead before mounting. In doing this, haven't had any issues seating a tire prior used tubeless.
    I'd have to guess that this is a practical system for you because you go through tires more often than most cyclists. So, you're already swapping out the tires before the build-up of sealant layers becomes problematic. Is that not correct?

  10. #10
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    Yes, for me, going tubeless has been great. Go-to ride has many thorns, and I used to flat often- now not at all.

    No, probably not, just a bit of a tire-ho. Switch 'em around when worn, torn, or wanting to try something new. Sidewall tears have been an issue on the lighter big-volume tires.

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