1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    When did you consider your self not a beginner?

    How many months or years did it take you to develop enough skill and speed to be able to consider your self not a beginner anymore?

  2. #2
    don't thread on me
    Reputation: Roswell52's Avatar
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    Age 5, when I thought I was on training wheels, and they were loose and not even touching the ground. My Dad had loosened the nuts up, and as soon as I took off, they were useless. I rode around for hours before I realized I had mastered two wheel travel.

    The rest is history!
    sign here ________________________

  3. #3
    I bike long tyme.
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    Controlled braking, wheelies and jumping were probably the red flag for me if we're talking skill sets. That happened at about 7 years old. I thought I was a hoss.
    People wait for me on the way up. I wait for them on the way down.

  4. #4
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    A beginner at what kind of riding?.... because you can be the best at pulling wheelies and be useless at goin downhill, be really good goin downhill and useless at XC.... there is so much to master, I wouldnt even bother thinking about it, you will be better at someone at one aspect of mountain biking and then someone else better than you at another...... aslong as your enjoying it and keep improving.....who cares??
    Hold on 2 your f***n fillings !!!!!

  5. #5
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    when i stopped asking questions in this forum

    mx

  6. #6
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    When I started answering questions on this forum.

  7. #7
    Just Ride
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    Really depends on what you think isn't beginner anymore. Everyone will have their own definition of what's beginner and what's not.

  8. #8
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    when i started to race the sport class.

    (just to clarify, i never actually got any help from this forum. i learned on a totally different site.)

    mx

  9. #9
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    I feel like a beginner everytime I go a long while not riding the mountain bike. I spend most of my time on the road bike.
    If I'm not climbing, I'm not riding.

  10. #10
    Probably drunk right now
    Reputation: Ken in KC's Avatar
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    Your answer...

    Quote Originally Posted by johnjamieson
    How many months or years did it take you to develop enough skill and speed to be able to consider your self not a beginner anymore?

    When you no longer have to ask the question of yourself, then you're no longer a beginner.

  11. #11
    ride like you stole it
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken in KC
    When you no longer have to ask the question of yourself, then you're no longer a beginner.
    I totally agree with this answer, when you honestly beleive that you have the skills to hit most trails and obstacles AND actually hit them, your no longer a beginner. Another good tell is that other bikers on the trails pull over to let you by.
    I lubed my disc brakes because they squeaked.
    Man was that fun to work out

  12. #12
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    I will hopefully always be a beginner. I hope that there is always something new for me to learn/master in the realm of cycling. Even the pro's are trying to learn new things everyday to push the sport.
    Sometimes your the windshield, other times just the bug. That's life. (c:
    Mountain Biking Apparel

  13. #13
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    When I realized, that my area had become surprisingly flat. When I was a beginner, it used to be all tough climbs and frightening downhill.

  14. #14
    Double-metric mtb man
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    I've alsways put it as: When I'm being asked more questions than I am asking, then I am not a beginner anymore.

    I may not know everything yet (not a beginner does not mean not still learning) but if I've hit the stage where more folks are coming to me for answers than I am going to others, then I can't be that green anymore.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

  15. #15
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    Just for the record, I can't wheelie at all and I'm not a beginner. I found a good way to judge is to just ride with other people. It deffinatly helps the self confidence when you can keep up with the more experienced guys, and it forces you to try to keep up. Always lead the pack when in a group, makes you faster.
    I live in Maine and I hate lobster.

  16. #16
    Rod
    Rod is offline
    Endorphin Junkie
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    The answer will come to you with time.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  17. #17
    Alien Surf Team
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    Many people who think they're beginners are not, and many that think they're experts are not. Just ride and don't worry about measuring yourself next to the person.

  18. #18
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    I would rather be a kick ass beginner than a suck ass expert. The cool thing about being a "beginner" is you conquer or learn somethin new every ride; maybe I do suck compared to those guys that fly by me, but I sure as hell love ridin just the same.

  19. #19
    I am a pathetic rider...
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    I will consider myself no longer a beginner, when I can answer every question that comes up in this forum.
    Save the Earth, Ride a Cyclist

  20. #20
    bi-winning
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    when i started wearing lycra
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  21. #21
    Single(Pivot)and Happy
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    Listen Grasshopper, a beginner is one who begins something. Skill, on the other hand, is a combination of natural ability, practice, experience, which is acquired. One who may win local races may come in last place elsewhere. You measure your progress by your confidence on your local trails. You measure your confidence on trails that you have never ridden before. Whether your progress and confidence comes in a month, a year, never, doesn't matter. as long as you carry the stoke inside of you.

    A piece of advice: Riding with people who have more skill than you will, more often than not, help one progress at a faster rate. One who only rides with people with less skill is more concerned with labels and image. Now go ride!
    The suspension of your bike sucks if it's different than mine. Really. It sucks. Big time.

  22. #22
    Ride the dream
    Reputation: EnglishT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boulder Pilot
    Listen Grasshopper, a beginner is one who begins something. Skill, on the other hand, is a combination of natural ability, practice, experience, which is acquired. One who may win local races may come in last place elsewhere. You measure your progress by your confidence on your local trails. You measure your confidence on trails that you have never ridden before. Whether your progress and confidence comes in a month, a year, never, doesn't matter. as long as you carry the stoke inside of you.

    A piece of advice: Riding with people who have more skill than you will, more often than not, help one progress at a faster rate. One who only rides with people with less skill is more concerned with labels and image. Now go ride!
    Nicely put.

    I dont like the term beginner - its belittling, and its not fair in a sense that everyone views it differently, and views YOU differently - learner is a much better term and one that applies to just about everyone, in varying degrees.

    We are all learners forever - untill/unless we choose not to be, by being happy with where we are... Well, not to be unfair but when you are happy with your skill levels (and personal bests etc), you might as well give up (in the nicest possible way) - theres nothing so exhilerating as pushing boundaries and doing things you never did before, or never could before - once you give up trying to best yourself, you go backwards and lose the thrill that (for most of us) drew you in to biking in the first place.

    There are exceptions of course - but truly, we are never "experts" in a sense that there is always something more to learn... Whether or not others will look on you as an expert or not, there is always more to learn, more barriers to push - and personal bests to beat...
    And while it would be silly to say that we are all beginners - we are all learners, because we all have things we can do (learn) to best ourselves - whether it be in general, or on a specific course, learning never ends.

  23. #23
    Zach Kowalchuk
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    when I got up some balls to ride some of these trails. IMO, I'd rather be, a beginner then a jackass "expert" who talks down to beginners.

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