1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Wheelies

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    54

    Wheelies

    I just bought a new gt zaskar expert . When I climb I can not keep the front wheel down Even on small climbs I have to stand and lean foward. Any suggestions???


    thanks

  2. #2
    Ride the dream
    Reputation: EnglishT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,381
    Few questions....


    How steep a climb does it take?
    Is everything stock? (Important question - especially on seatpost and stem)

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    54
    It does not take much of a hill at all for it to take to the air. I can copensate with body position on smaller stuff but I have stop on any slighty callenging climb. yes all stock

  4. #4
    Ride the dream
    Reputation: EnglishT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,381
    How tall are you and what size frame are you on?

    (sorry - just wanna be sure that its not equipment before it ends up on technique questions)

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    54
    large frame. I am 6'1"

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    529
    Generally the first thing to do is lower your torso towards the top tube, if that's not enough, try scooting all the way to the front of the saddle so you are sitting on the very nose and keep your torso down.
    Standing can get your weight forward and give you a bit more power but it is a bit harder to keep your CG in the sweet spot that gives you enough weight over the rear wheel to keep traction and enough weight over the front to keep it down. On a smooth climb it works but throw in some roots, big rocks, etc. and it gets tough to finesse it when standing.

    Also, sitting you can put the power down more smoothly than standing so you avoid the bursts of torque that want to lift the front wheel or break traction.

  7. #7
    Ride the dream
    Reputation: EnglishT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,381
    Well put.


    Another thing (personal choice, but works for me) is to whack the saddle a bit further forward on the rails (and it allows you to ride further forward on it aswell if needed).
    This puts your weight forward on seated climbs.
    It also has the added bonus of giving more space (makes it easier) to ride off the back on really steep descents.

  8. #8
    American Icon
    Reputation: Fender Roads's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    92

    A few ideas...

    1. Slide forward on the saddle more (on the nose of the saddle). I have a large freeride bike (tall front end due to the fork) and by sliding forward on the saddle, I can keep the front end down on 95% of all trail rides.

    2. Lean forward more into the bars but stay seated. I know it sounds basic, but whenever I hit a tough climb, that is the first thing I do to keep the front end from wandering.

    3. If that doesn't work, try swapping out a different stem. Maybe something with zero degree rise? A LBS should be able to help you out.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    176
    Why not just take the hill on your back tire? Way more impressive than making it on two.

    Seriously though, my first question would be how much riding experience do you have? Making steep hills without wheelies and without losing traction can be very difficult. Many times, experience and feel are the two most important part of cresting steep, technical hills. My advice is largely the same as everyone else who has posted. Good luck.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    54
    Thank you all for you input but I ride the same trail 3 nights a week. my last bike was an old cannondale f-900 it never gave me this problem. I sold it to get this bike so I can not use it to match riding position. I am not a great rider but I know I can do things better on other bikes than i can on my new zaskar. I just need help getting her dialed in

  11. #11
    Ride the dream
    Reputation: EnglishT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,381
    It just takes time to get it to feel exactly how you want... the cockpit length may not be exactly the same - its all about complimenting the angles on the frame you have now.


    As a starting point - do you feel too stretched out right now?
    Moving the saddle forward on the rails would help keep the weight forward on seated climbs and would bring your riding position more upright.

    Also - how does your steering feel?
    If it feels a little fast for your liking, a longer stem might work wonders (more weight over the front axle = more pressure to hold the tyre to the ground.

    If your steering feels perfect, I would try to sort it with the saddle position alone.. If your steering is a little quick for your liking you could try method number 2 also.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    54
    moved seat foward and going for a ride. I don't know about a longer stem guys I'm already on 110mm. 120mm just looks huge to me. Is there a weight limit on a 120mm? What would be the result of flipping my 110mm stem from +6 to -6 deg?

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: snowdenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    406
    someone taught me to pull down on the handlebar on particularly steep climbs. instead of pulling back which helps raise the front wheel, pulling down helps keep the wheel from lifting. like rowing, and time each pull with pedal strokes. might help.

  14. #14
    Ride the dream
    Reputation: EnglishT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,381
    Quote Originally Posted by patada
    moved seat foward and going for a ride. I don't know about a longer stem guys I'm already on 110mm. 120mm just looks huge to me. Is there a weight limit on a 120mm? What would be the result of flipping my 110mm stem from +6 to -6 deg?
    Yea 110 is already pretty long. 120 or 130 might make alot of difference though.
    That said - if youre a big fella, its gonna have to be very stiff (read, heavy of expensive) for you not to feel it flexing.

    Flipping it would also put more weight on the front wheel - because your body is leaned further forward and so your weight is further forward.


    Personally, I wouldnt change too many things at a time - if you do, you wont know which one has had what affect if you find you dont like it (or if you find youve gone to far, choosing which to reverse is harder).

    Can I just ask - did your bike really come stock with a 110mm stem?
    I mean, thats quite long - more often its the LBS that would put on a stem like that to "make it fit" if it doesnt quite already.
    (Just asking)

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    395
    Are you in your granny ring? I never could figure out how to climb in it, so started leaving it in the middle ring and standing on climbs. Didn't take long before I gave up on gears all together and went SS.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •