1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TuCsaT's Avatar
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    Wheel truing on bike

    So as of a rough ride saturday morning I managed to get home with my front wheel slightly less wavy than a potato chip. what is your general opinion on truing the wheel on the bike? I've read one or two guides on how to do it and it seems like with a little trial and error I should be able to pull it off but have a couple of questions:

    1. is it true that because I have disk brakes that the tension is supposed to be different on either side?

    2. without a truing stand will i be able to remove most of the wobble?

    thanks in advance.

    tucsat

  2. #2
    On MTBR hiatus :(
    Reputation: Speedub.Nate's Avatar
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    Yes, and Yes.

    You've probably read the tip to use a pencil or some similar object, tied to the fork or stays, to act as a feeler. That's all it takes. You can even flip-flop your wheel in the dropouts to check dish, though you may need to remove you disc caliper to do so.

    The tension will work itself out as you bring the wheel true. Don't worry about the relative difference between drive side and non-drive side. Just ensure that the tensions are similar from spoke to spoke on each side. You'll be in good shape.

    Three tips:

    1. Plan to take your time.

    2. Then actually take your time. It may take a few tries.

    3. You can (almost) never f— it up so bad that you can't take it to a bike shop to fix. So keep working at it, even if it seems hopeless at first.
    speedub.nate
    MTBR Hiatus UFN

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jpick915's Avatar
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    Zip-ties work great as guides for on bike wheel truing.
    All other things being equal, the simplest solution is the best...William of Ockham

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TuCsaT's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies guys. I'm gonna give it a go tonight if I get a chance to go to the store and pick up a spoke tightener. I'm pretty sure I'll have some more questions once I start screwing it up

    tuck

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