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  1. #1
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    wheel popped out of dropout

    I'm new to mtbs, Just got my Jamis Komodo a week ago. Already been on 2 pretty long rides (about 6 miles each), had one flat...and a couple of wrecks. Anyways, today I go for a short ride but with a steep climb. I get about halfway up the climb and decide to stand up. On the first crank turn I suddenly stop and the pedal is froze. I think, oh no, what have I broke. A quick inspection showed the rear wheel came out of the dropout and the wheel moved forward and was lodged up against the rear stay crossmember. Never had this happen before on my road bike. I think I had it in tight but I guess I should have re-tightened the skewer after the first few miles (ridden the other day). Only took a minute to get it fixed and back rolling. I actually needed the break because it allowed me to finish the climb without walking the bike like I had to do on this same hill the other day. Anyways, just wondering if this has happened to anyone else and if it was because I didn't have the skewer tightened properly.

  2. #2
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    just be glad it was not your FRONT wheel that did that. *faceplant* always check your skewers before you ride.

  3. #3
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    never had that happen make sure it's in the dropouts all the way before tightening the QR. It should be reasonably tight.

  4. #4
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    At the risk of offending....

    What you described isn't normal. "retightening" the skewer isn't normal either.

    Here's where I risk offending you (not intentional, just want to cover the bases):

    Your skewer is a cam. There is an open position and a closed position. It should be in the closed position at all times unless you want to remove the wheel from the drop outs.

    If you have it in the open position and try to tighten it down in the drop outs without moving the skewer lever to the closed position, the wheel will most certainly pop out while you're riding.

    Most levers are curved. When the lever is in the closed position, the convex curve should be visible while looking in toward the bike. If the lever is in the open position, the concave side will be visible.

    Ken
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  5. #5
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    10-4, and yep, I plan to pay more attention from now on.

  6. #6
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    No offense Ken and your post did make me think of something. I know how to adjust a skewer for proper tension but I bet I knocked it into the unlocked position on one of my wrecks. I just didnt look closely afterwards. I will be more vigilant from now on, even if I haven't wrecked.

  7. #7
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    I think a lot of people underestimate how tight the skewer should be. If you've tensioned it properly, accidentally knocking it open is pretty unlikely. You should also point the lever in a direction that is less likely to snag on stuff.

  8. #8
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    I point them either down or towards the back depending on how the frame and assessors permit. I do have to use a pretty strong push to get it closed. But Im thinking I might need just a hair tighter than I'm used to doing on my DF or Recumbent.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by coyboy View Post
    I point them either down or towards the back depending on how the frame and assessors permit. I do have to use a pretty strong push to get it closed. But Im thinking I might need just a hair tighter than I'm used to doing on my DF or Recumbent.
    I would be more careful on the position of the lever when its closed. If its pointing down or forward then a branch or rock could get cought in it and open it. I usually align mine up. Makes it easier for me to visually check too. If the lever is pointing up then I know its closed, any other direction its open or loose.

  10. #10
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    I like the Hex key skewers. The way I see it is that if I can carry a patch kit and spare tube for my tires, why not a small hex wrench to remove/install my tires?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by coyboy View Post
    I point them either down or towards the back depending on how the frame and assessors permit. I do have to use a pretty strong push to get it closed. But Im thinking I might need just a hair tighter than I'm used to doing on my DF or Recumbent.
    Never down. Never, never, never down. The only worse position is forward. If you can't put the lever facing backward, point it upward as closely guarded by the fork leg as possible.

    Edit: you should also be closing your skewer such that it is difficult to flip the lever back down into the open position. It should never be a simple task to remove the wheel, make sure it requires some force to open the QR.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  12. #12
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    Agree - front wheel QR never forward. I tend to do upward along the shock or straight back and up as much as possible. I don't close it across the fork leg because it may not close 100% before contacting the fork.
    For the rear wheel I think forward is OK. Point it upward slightly and its protected between the stays. Forward and down would be asking it to get caught up on grass, sticks and branches.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by qa_bugfinder View Post
    For the rear wheel I think forward is OK. Point it upward slightly and its protected between the stays. Forward and down would be asking it to get caught up on grass, sticks and branches.
    Good point, I was just focused on the front wheel for some reason. I do tuck the QR lever into the rear triangle when that is possible.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by coyboy View Post
    No offense Ken and your post did make me think of something. I know how to adjust a skewer for proper tension but I bet I knocked it into the unlocked position on one of my wrecks. I just didnt look closely afterwards. I will be more vigilant from now on, even if I haven't wrecked.
    Contary too most....

    I always run the QR levers so they point backwards....so that a branch or grass or what ever can't get betweent the lever and the bike and the forward motion causes the lever to open.

  15. #15
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    thanks for the tips. Im learning all the time. just spent 4 and a half hours clearing a trial I normally walk. Left 7 logs that were just too big but I can still get in a good 4 mile ride with a bunch of short climbs. Problem is, now I'm too tard to go back and ride it...

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Contary too most....

    I always run the QR levers so they point backwards....so that a branch or grass or what ever can't get betweent the lever and the bike and the forward motion causes the lever to open.
    This is crazy talk.

    Most skewers are nearly touching the fork or frame when they're closed, and they would take a pretty good amount of force for any branch to open. I mean... it's supposed to have some resistance to your hand, which is attached to a pretty decent lever called your arm.

    But, if the skewer is hanging out, it can be affected by anything that comes at you laterally... like a rock or stick jumping through the spokes.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by fireball_jones View Post
    This is crazy talk.

    Most skewers are nearly touching the fork or frame when they're closed, and they would take a pretty good amount of force for any branch to open. I mean... it's supposed to have some resistance to your hand, which is attached to a pretty decent lever called your arm.

    But, if the skewer is hanging out, it can be affected by anything that comes at you laterally... like a rock or stick jumping through the spokes.
    I've had skewers opened by trail objects and I've seen it happen many times. It's always best practice to position the skewers such that they are resistant to being caught on trail objects, you can't be too careful when it comes to the thing attaching the wheels to the bike.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by fireball_jones View Post
    This is crazy talk.

    Most skewers are nearly touching the fork or frame when they're closed, and they would take a pretty good amount of force for any branch to open. I mean... it's supposed to have some resistance to your hand, which is attached to a pretty decent lever called your arm.

    But, if the skewer is hanging out, it can be affected by anything that comes at you laterally... like a rock or stick jumping through the spokes.
    Well in real life this happens.....just make sure that it doesn't happen to you.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Well in real life this happens.....just make sure that it doesn't happen to you.
    I don't know what kind of crazy grass you have where you live, but I maintain that a well tightened skewer placed against a fork leg or frame could not be opened by anything you'd run into on a trail, short of a crazed, skewer-opening hobo.

    Point the skewer into the wind though, and sure, something might come along and knock it open. If you're really concerned about your wheels coming off, I'd suggest you run a nutted-rear skewer and a through axle fork, preferably something beefy like a Fox 36 with its front-closing, triple redundant axle.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by fireball_jones View Post
    I don't know what kind of crazy grass you have where you live, but I maintain that a well tightened skewer placed against a fork leg or frame could not be opened by anything you'd run into on a trail, short of a crazed, skewer-opening hobo.

    Point the skewer into the wind though, and sure, something might come along and knock it open. If you're really concerned about your wheels coming off, I'd suggest you run a nutted-rear skewer and a through axle fork, preferably something beefy like a Fox 36 with its front-closing, triple redundant axle.
    No need for all that crap and extra weight...

    We got lots of stuff that will make it happen, junipers, sage, brush, twigs, spruce, grass around here can grow to over shoulder height.

    All you have to down is turn the skewer so in "goes with the flow" it will never happen again.

  21. #21
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    It happens...

    Quote Originally Posted by fireball_jones View Post
    I don't know what kind of crazy grass you have where you live, but I maintain that a well tightened skewer placed against a fork leg or frame could not be opened by anything you'd run into on a trail, short of a crazed, skewer-opening hobo.

    Point the skewer into the wind though, and sure, something might come along and knock it open. If you're really concerned about your wheels coming off, I'd suggest you run a nutted-rear skewer and a through axle fork, preferably something beefy like a Fox 36 with its front-closing, triple redundant axle.
    Ride long enough and it will happen. It really boils down to common sense (which is often times lacking).

    I've ridden bikes where I've pointed the rear skewer backwards. On one of my current bikes, there's a strut between my seat stay and chain stay that allows me to neatly tuck my rear skewer inside the frame in a protected triangle. Facing forward. On my other mountain bike, it's facing backwards.

    For the front of the bike, I've always tried to face the skewer up and tucked behind the fork leg.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

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