1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
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    What's reasonable to expect a set of custom wheels to cost?

    I know there's a huge price-range in there, but I want to upgrade my wheels eventually to something mid-range (I suppose), and I'm wondering how much it'd cost to get something with white rims and red spokes. I'm running the bike stiff right now, so it's a toss-up between a set of new tires or some suspension. If anyone wants any more info I can dig up what I can find.

    As far as I know the current are still stock
    http://www1.epinions.com/bicycles_2002_Bianchi_D_I_S_S_

    But I can't really tell because there aren't a whole lot of brand markings. pretty sure they are, though. One of the wheels treading is slightly damaged, and although the LBS guy told me it's nothing to worry about, it has me concerned. I don't want to be on top of it if it blows.

  2. #2
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
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    Less than 5 seconds with google returned:

    http://www.prowheelbuilder.com/

    You can also go do your LBS and ask them about building you a custom wheel set. It is very expensive but could be a good upgrade.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  3. #3
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    That's cool that you know how to use google, dude; some people don't.

  4. #4
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    So yea, I'm thinking a new fork or a new wheelset could run me the same cost. I just don't know what to look for in wheels. I'm not in much of a hurry to upgrade the fork, though.

    Can anyone tell me how easy it'd be to get a lighter set of tires than the ones on my bike currently? I don't know how to find out how much they weigh online, and I don't have anything other than a bathroom scale. I'm still looking for something sturdy enough to take some small hits though, especially since I'm running rigid.

    Sorry if this post's a bit of a mess, and let me know if you need more information to help me choose something specific. I don't have a set price range, but I'm thinking no more than 300 for a full set if that's reasonable to expect.

  5. #5
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    I would spend some time reading posts on the Wheels and Tires forum:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/wheels-tires/

    I have learned lots by reading other people's posts there.

    To find tire weights your best bet is to put the tire's brand name and model name in google and you can usually find a post that will have the tire's weight. You could also put the name of the tire in the search function on this site and you will probably get some results.

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Tire manufacturers post the weights of their tires. They typically don't lie by more than 5-10%.

    Red spokes will be expensive. White rims are chic right now, so not as difficult.

    Check out bicyclewheelwarehouse.com for wheels covering pretty much the whole range of custom pricepoints. (Maybe not the spokes you want, though.) I've got some $200 wheels on the way. A friend of mine works for a company that makes $2600 road/cross racing wheels. That's fairly representative of the range.

    If you're good with your hands and your hubs are worth keeping, you can also build your own wheels, with anything you want and can find.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
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    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...+Wheelset.aspx you can beat the **** outta these rims for years..best bang for buck

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmik
    That's cool that you know how to use google, dude; some people don't.
    Quote Originally Posted by mmik
    ...snip...

    Can anyone tell me how easy it'd be to get a lighter set of tires than the ones on my bike currently? I don't know how to find out how much they weigh online, and I don't have anything other than a bathroom scale. I'm still looking for something sturdy enough to take some small hits though, especially since I'm running rigid.
    ...snip....
    I am guessing your in the group that don't know how to use Google?
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

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