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  1. #1
    VTT
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    What's the difference...

    between Enduro and Cross-country?

  2. #2
    The Ultimate Niche
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    They're spelled different... I think...

    As I always say... Cross-Country is what we people in the mid-west do since we have no Mountians. Endro, Mt. Cross, and Free Riding is what people who live by mountians do!!! I thinks thats fair.

  3. #3
    There's no app for this.
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    it's loosely

    defined many ways but think of XC as a bike with a 3" front fork or a FS bike with up to 3" travel primarily designed to ride singletrack trails.... like cow paths through the mountains.

    Enduro moves more into longer travel of 4-6" and bikes have a slacker head angle for bigger obstacle hits like roots and logs and rocks, and generally can take drops of up to about 5'.

    It's ever-evolving. Jim

  4. #4
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    As I always say... Cross-Country is what we people in the mid-west do since we have no Mountians. Endro, Mt. Cross, and Free Riding is what people who live by mountians do!!! I thinks thats fair.
    Oh, I dunno. Just cause we have mountains, doesn't mean we don't ride XC. Over here though, it means something a little different.

    XC is for people who like going up the mountain.
    DH is for people who only like going down, and have ski lifts near by.
    FR is for people who like to Jump off crap.
    Enduro/Trail Bikes are for those of us who like to do a little of everything.

    I'm in the last category. I like to climb 4000 feet (XC), come down scary fast (DH), and take all the drops along the way (FR).

  5. #5
    consistent default champ
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    yeah, Down Hill I know but I don't know what people are talking about when they say XC or whatever and I don't want to ask when everyone else apparently knows. I just get on my bike and ride up hills (but nothing like 4K ~ zoiks!), down the hills and small logs, roots and small drops. I don't think I have been anywhere where there are 4K hills (SC and NC mountains)

  6. #6
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    Sounds like you pretty much define XC riding. It's funny, the whole sport of mountain biking kind of started with a bunch of maniacs pushing their beach cruisers up gravel roads and bombing down, but now 90% of trail riding is of the "CrossCountry" style.

    I'm actually kind of jealous. I miss the up and down style of XC riding that I cut my teeth on in California. Climbing up to 9 or 10 thousand feet (starting at about 5k) is a great challenge, but it would be nice to have the occasional rolling trail that you can really hammer on. There is almost nothing around here that climbs less than 1k, and those that do climb like 750 feet in a mile.

    *Sigh*

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