1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Whats with the attitude riding bicycles?

    Something I've noticed while riding both on street and dirt is that the riders are not very friendly. Maybe its just a thing here in Southern California with MTBing but it also tranfers to riding streets cause my cousin only rides street and he said its the same thing. Is it an attitude that I have a better bike than you so there for Im better than you?? I ride motorcycles and we always, always aknowledge other riders. Im still the type of individual that will greet others but arent we out there to have fun in the first place?

  2. #2
    Pimpmobile
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    I find the opposite here on the east coast... I encounter other riders mostly on the road, but even the Colnago riders around here will throw a wave to me and my Windsor.


    Keep doing what you do... if other riders want to be snobs, maybe one day you'll pass them on a trail with a flat and have just the tool they need.

  3. #3
    Blue Pig
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    Us Eastern riders are friendly.

    If I rode a sturdy turdy I am sure I would still get some waves and greetings.
    I give positive rep all around but then I get negative rep from all the clowns.

  4. #4
    d00bie
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    For the short amount of time ive been riding, here in NC...around the Asheville/ Hendo area, all the riders here are very nice. Its kinda like, Hey you got a bike, ive got a bike, so were brothers or friends ya know!?!? Ive even said hi to someone on the trail and had a conversation start from there, everyone is super cool here and super nice. There are always going to be cacks out there that dont give a care unfortunately.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbl_91762
    Something I've noticed while riding both on street and dirt is that the riders are not very friendly. Maybe its just a thing here in Southern California with MTBing but it also tranfers to riding streets cause my cousin only rides street and he said its the same thing. Is it an attitude that I have a better bike than you so there for Im better than you?? I ride motorcycles and we always, always aknowledge other riders. Im still the type of individual that will greet others but arent we out there to have fun in the first place?

    That's Southern California for you! I recommend moving to New England... it's much friendlier, and people are very welcoming!

  6. #6
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    In central CT, I find most MTBers to be friendly.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  7. #7
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    While I am still new to this myself... I say hi to everyone (if my lungs allow me) bikers, hikers, anyone that's out where I am out.

    If people don't respond back, no sweat, I just keep on with my smile and enjoy the rest of my ride!

  8. #8
    2010 RockHopper Comp Disc
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    Everybody I meet on the trail seems to be very friendly other than those who ride walmart bikes. Everybody always says hello and if I am ever stopped for a reason, everybody always stops and asks if Im ok. In in NY

  9. #9
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    Just about every single person I've met has been nice, said hi, asked if I need help if I'm stopped, offered to let me tag along to learn new trails, etc. Louisville, KY.

  10. #10
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    in WA everyone is too nice. Everybody stops on the trail to let you by so nobody ever moves. Then to pass the time they ask how your day is going and if you need a clif bar or sip of espresso from their heated camelbak

    G.

  11. #11
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    People I have encountered in New England have all been very nice.

  12. #12
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    Smile Hey Jbl

    I'm in Socal as well. Welcome to the community. There are a lot of nice rider and some stuffed up ones as well , Regardless, I say hi or acknowledge them all. Most rodies and mtb are friendly some street riders like singlespeed and fixies are most of the time to cool to say hi.

    Don't let that discourage you though, keep doing what you do when you stop you'll become one of them a$$ sending out negative vibe to the sports.

  13. #13
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    WV is a friendly mountain biking state in my experience so far. My area there are not many roadies but the group I ride with from MD is very nice. Even though they mostly have $2000+ bikes with doubles and compacts I was always treated as an equal and a friend. I was only berated once for having an $800 road bike with a triple and it was this short balding fat guy that nobody in the club likes that has to be a douche to make himself feel better about being such a looser. Pricks are everywhere. You can have 100 people around you and 99 of them will be as nice as could be but there is always that one.

  14. #14
    human dehumidifier
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster
    Pricks are everywhere.
    QFT.
    But if you close your eyes it becomes so easy to see

  15. #15
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    not here in AZ. all bikers who passes me always says hi or hello and even hikers too. it might be just in cali.
    2000 something DB Sorrento
    2010 Motobecane 29Pro SL

  16. #16
    ride the moment
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    Cycling, both dirt and road, is far too popular for "riders" as a group to be stereotyped. The attitudes of riders simply reflect the attitude of the population. Every time this discussion (or similar) comes up I think of Idiocracy. "Dude... you like money AND chicks? We should totally hang out!"
    Just because you read a book it don't make you conscious. - MC Lush

  17. #17
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    I don't ride to socialize. I will never understand why anyone would care if I say hi, wave or anything, The only thing that matters to me when I encounter another rider is that the proper yielding takes place.

  18. #18
    What?
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    When I am on the trail, if I see someone, they are usually nice. You have the random 5'5'' guy with a $4000.00 bike and a belt muffin who thinks he is better then you you because he has a expensive bike that he doesn't know how to ride. Then again, its hard to ride when you gut hits the handle bars. Anyway, most the people in Ohio are nice on the trail. But i have noticed that on the street (and pretty much just in general), the people in Ohio are rude. You say hi and they just ignore you or role their eyes at you. Its pretty frustrating sometimes.

  19. #19
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    I always heard the harley guys in leather started that acknowldgement wave, sort of an underground sign saying "I'm gay, too".

    Seriously, when you drive a car do you wave at each other? When you're walking along a street you wave and say hi to everyone? When you go into a restaurant do you expect everyone to greet you? Maybe I'm more of a city person, but that's expecting a lot....
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  20. #20
    pants on head retarded
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy Cool
    I don't ride to socialize. I will never understand why anyone would care if I say hi, wave or anything, The only thing that matters to me when I encounter another rider is that the proper yielding takes place.
    You must be one of those southern california riders he's talking about

    I keed, I keed - but most other comments here are pretty accurate - the reactions you get on the trail are going to be representative of the population. Folks here (Reno) generally wave and say hi when you ride by. Most people don't care what you ride, just *that* you ride.

    Don't let it get you down and keep being friendly, maybe you can change the trend

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikinfoolferlife
    I always heard the harley guys in leather started that acknowldgement wave, sort of an underground sign saying "I'm gay, too".

    Seriously, when you drive a car do you wave at each other? When you're walking along a street you wave and say hi to everyone? When you go into a restaurant do you expect everyone to greet you? Maybe I'm more of a city person, but that's expecting a lot....
    I don't know about you but I don't pass hundreds of other bikers on the trail either like I do other cars on the road when driving my car to school/work. When I am on the trail I am lucky to see one or two other people so it isn't out of line to expect a little courtesy. Just a two finger (not a one finger salute) acknowledgment or a nod of the head is even fine but no reason to be stuck up.

    It's funny though that you bring up the car thing because about 10 years ago I bought a Jeep Wrangler and until that point I never had people wave at me on the road but as soon as I started driving that Jeep I got waved at by more people (all driving Jeeps) that I ever had my entire life. I found the same to be true when I bought my first VW GTi too. A lot of other vdub drivers waved at me. I always thought it was kinda cool. My g/f would ask who was that and I would say I had no idea, it was just a Jeep/VW thing.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy Cool
    I don't ride to socialize. I will never understand why anyone would care if I say hi, wave or anything, The only thing that matters to me when I encounter another rider is that the proper yielding takes place.
    It's your right to be stuck up but I don't see the point of being anti-social. I mean if it were a really busy trail and you passed a lot of other bikers then yeah, I might not go out of my way to say hi in passing either verbally or with a gesture but to show a little niceties while out on the trail won't kill you.

  23. #23
    Pimpmobile
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    Pardon me...


    Do you have any Grey Poupon?

  24. #24
    What?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster
    It's your right to be stuck up but I don't see the point of being anti-social. I mean if it were a really busy trail and you passed a lot of other bikers then yeah, I might not go out of my way to say hi in passing either verbally or with a gesture but to show a little niceties while out on the trail won't kill you.

    I agree, I dont expect to have a 5 minute conversation with everyone I see,( maybe one or two people each ride.) I dont think its to much to ask that if I say hi to some one or if i give a nod or whatever, to get some sort of respose other then a dirty look or a roll of the eyes.

  25. #25
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    What is up with these uppity fuks on their POS $500 bikes always wavin and sayin 'Hi' to me. They act like they're 9-year-old schoolgirls at a slumber party or something. The more they wave and get up in my face, the more I have to scowl - can't those fags get the hint??
    Honestly... ahh I give up

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