1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
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    What is the worst text book bike move you've done wrong

    There is a book I finished reading called Mastering Mountain Bike Skills by Brian Lopes and Lee McCormack. I highly recommend this read. A friend said it was available at the local library. Now on to the good stuff. After hours of reading I thought I would try some bicycle kung fu as they called it in the book. We were riding a intermediate trail and there was this log running across the trail. I was riding at a good speed. Said to myself I'm going to jump it, and clear it! Ummmh What happened next is I thought I had hit log with my rear tire because I lost control and I was still rolling right towards a tree straight on. In a instant I pictured if I swerved I'm going to get flung. I managed to turn the front wheel enough that it missed the tree. I ended up grabbing the tree with both hands. Shoulder slams into tree. I was amazed that I didn't crack or bend the handle bar or mess up the shifter or brake.

    My friend I was riding with said you cleared that log. But you lost control, and he asked, " You do know how to use brakes don't you? Because you didn't even try to stop." I need to get better in these situations and not panic which I did

  2. #2
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    I went slow through what appeared to be a shallow puddle. Yes it was shallow, but there was nothing but moist clay underneath. I sunk right through and got stuck. When I got off my bike, I sunk down to my ankles. The puddle was 20ft in length and this happened right in the middle so needless to say, I had to wash my shoes out in muddy water and ride wiuth wet shoes for the afternoon. Luckily I didn't get blisters.
    My friend rode through quite rapidly and barely even got wet.

    *edit..Not that ther's really a "text-book" move for what I did. Still a dumb move as I was being a panzy and didnt want to get all muddy at the start of the trail on a very, very dry batch of trails. Main reason for choosing them.
    Last edited by Dirtydogg; 08-16-2012 at 04:50 PM.
    GT Karakoram

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtydogg View Post
    I went slow through what appeared to be a shallow puddle. Yes it was shallow, but there was nothing but moist clay underneath. I sunk right through and got stuck. When I got off my bike, I sunk down to my ankles. The puddle was 20ft in length and this happened right in the middle so needless to say, I had to wash my shoes out in muddy water and ride wiuth wet shoes for the afternoon. Luckily I didn't get blisters.
    My friend rode through quite rapidly and barely even got wet.

    *edit..Not that ther's really a "text-book" move for what I did. Still a dumb move as I was being a panzy and didnt want to get all muddy at the start of the trail on a very, very dry batch of trails. Main reason for choosing them.
    It's all good. We were riding that very same trail I mentioned I believe this happened before my accident. I was following my friend trying to learn some new things. When he came to a stop after I caught up with him. I asked, "Why did you stop?" he pointed to a puddle, and I replied, "I think you'll be ok. You'll just get a little wet and some mud." I would have plowed it probably getting a good endo out of the deal.

  4. #4
    FKA Malibu412
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    Too far forward on a rocky, technical descent. Guess what happened next.

    Everything that kills me, makes me feel alive

  5. #5
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    Damn Malibu, you really bit the rock on that one...lol
    That sucks, nothing like explaining to everyone you work with and meet face-face what happened. While the blood looks spread around, I'd still say it took a few weeks to diminish and for the scabs to go away. Yikes.
    GT Karakoram

  6. #6
    FKA Malibu412
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtydogg View Post
    Damn Malibu, you really bit the rock on that one...lol
    That sucks, nothing like explaining to everyone you work with and meet face-face what happened. While the blood looks spread around, I'd still say it took a few weeks to diminish and for the scabs to go away. Yikes.
    Exactly
    Everything that kills me, makes me feel alive

  7. #7
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    I was playing around on a trail I ride every weekend and rolled over a root on a technical trail way to slow and it slammed me to the ground. I caught myself with my hands but I hit so hard they went numb. Now both hands are bruised from my palms to above my wrists! I learned my lesson about going to slow over things!

  8. #8
    duh
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    jumping a mini gully. Made it the first time round, but on the way back I tried jumping again but forgot that there was a root on the one side. On the second attempt on the way back home my rear tire snagged the root and put my front tire into the middle of the gully sending me head first over my handle bars. Ouch.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412 View Post
    Exactly
    Ouch! That had to be painful.

  10. #10
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    Skinny narrow wooden bridge after rain. Down I go. I've done that at least twice.

    No more wet wood riding for me.

  11. #11
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Target fixation. I'd been scared for years of falling off the downslope side of a benched singletrack. Finally I did. It was on a very steep slope, and I ended up in some tree tops. It took me a little while to get disentangled, but I was fine.

    Actually, here's another target fixation incident. I was riding at a pretty good clip through some dirt bike jumps on a race course. A guy had wiped out on the immediate downslope side of one and was still half in the trail. I tipped my bike just a little too much in his direction when I looked, and ended up in the bushes. That hurt.

    Ooh, I'm on a roll. Cyclocross remount on the top of a little hill. It was a wet, muddy day and the course was thrashed. I didn't find my balance in time not to fall down the whole thing. D'oh!

    Failing to protect my front wheel. Some guy started attacking sideways and I decided that today was not the day to be intimidated. But I didn't have enough of a kick to get me far enough forward to support that assertion. He took out my front wheel. I took out about four guys behind me. Finished the race, and it gave me an excuse to get some handlebars I like a lot better.

    OK, now I need to go to bed. MTB is fun!
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  12. #12
    Serenity now!
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    I have an uncontrollable urge to slam on both brakes just as my front wheel drops over the edge of a steep spot. The resulting rear-wheel lifts, crashes, and near-endos are pretty terrifying.

    As a result, I need to overcome a deep-rooted fear of steep spots. This scenario has happened over and over at one particular place on my usual trail. It is soo fun to fly over it when I nail it, but I hesitate every time.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by PixieChik View Post
    I have an uncontrollable urge to slam on both brakes just as my front wheel drops over the edge of a steep spot. The resulting rear-wheel lifts, crashes, and near-endos are pretty terrifying.

    As a result, I need to overcome a deep-rooted fear of steep spots. This scenario has happened over and over at one particular place on my usual trail. It is soo fun to fly over it when I nail it, but I hesitate every time.
    Endo's are no fun. The worst one I ever had was going down a hill. I broke my fall by reaching out with my right arm to try and help from smashing my face into the ground. Well that helped with the fall but it was a slow ride back to the car. Right hand = back brake and it was painful to put on the rear brake. Found this picture thought it would be funny to post. Not to bad of a job with photoshop.
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  14. #14
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    ouch

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