1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    What type of cleats are right for me?

    I'm a relative newbie but having lots of fun. I'm riding mostly offroad trails, and single track and that's probaly what I will be riding.
    I have an old Specialized hard rock with no suspension. I find my feet are slipping off a lot when climbing rougher trails or just when it gets rough in corners and stuff.

    So i was looking at clipless pedals?
    How do the SPD and egg beater type differ? Is one better performing/easier to use?

    What would you recommend? Are all shoes compatable with all pedals? Just a matter of screwing in the right cleats?

    I saw a pair of LG eldoroda shoes cheap, and the Crank bros Candy C seem like a decent deal.

    Budget is a huge concern for me.

    THx guys

  2. #2
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    well im a complete newbie to mtnbiking, but will offer advice nevertheless....(I might add that I spend a lot of time on this forum and try to gather as much info as I can...) My bike came with clipless pedals (m-520) and I bought diadora shoes at Performance for $40. Very happy so far. I actually feel better clipped in when riding trails, even tricky sections (for me at least) since I feel that I have more control over bike. I really like my m-520's and have seen them on ebay for cheap. I find it easy to clip/un clip and so far they have been very reliable (so far being ~ 200 miles). Shoes are Diadora geko. Very happy with this setup and I believe this setup can be had for about 60-70$$$

  3. #3
    Vaginatarian
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    spds are adjustable, hold tighter(have no play) don't work that well in mud or snow
    for starting out they are the hardest to get used to
    time atacs and crank bros eggbeatres are very similar, no adjustments, more play (better for knees) real good in mud and snow

    get some decent shoes with a stiff sole, and some good gloves as you WILL be falling alot

    I prefer the Times

  4. #4
    swoosh!
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    I'd recommend the Shimano's M-520 ($40 at Performance Bike right now in store) or a better model is the M-540. I'm also new to this clipless and have found the M-520s to be very very easy to clip in and out. I do keep my tension a little loose so i can clip out on uphills at any second. However, the tension is not loose enough to affect my upstroke.

    I have NOT tried the eggbeaters, but they are better suited for muddy/wet conditions. My shimano's love to hold sand and dirt, but it still works perfectly fine. So another vote for M-520s (or M-540s if you have an extra $20-30).
    Crawling uphill is a skill!

  5. #5
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    Thx guys, sounds good so far.
    If I could only find a place to try on shoes locally that aren't over $150....
    I have wide feet and a lot of those MTB shoes look really narrow.

  6. #6
    Endurance Junkie
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    I have wide feet as well. I have found that the Shimano and Specialized mountain shoes fit me well. Here are a couple that I have used:

    Shimano SH-M120 (~$80) - these were my old shoes that I liked a lot. I found that they fit really well and were pretty good for walking around too. As they got older I needed to pull the straps a lot tighter but that is to be expected. They are obviously not the stiffest shoe around for the price.
    Specialized Comp - these are a little more expensive (~$120) but I like them so far. They have the ratchet up top, which I find provides a better fit. You definitely would need to try these on as the Body Geometry stuff just doesn't work for some feet.

    As for pedals, I had a pair of cheap Shimano pedals on my old bike and found that they were okay. They did the job but held onto mud like there is no tomorrow. I just got a pair of Candy C pedals that I haven't gotten to use yet but they should shed mud a little better and as the poster above said, they have some float.

  7. #7
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    When I first started learning to ride clipless, I had the Shimano M520s. They were alright to use but I found myself having difficulty getting my feet out when I crashed at times or if I needed to dab.

    Fast forward a couple months, I picked up some Candy's and I have loved them ever since. They don't provide that click feedback when you step into them like the Shimano's but I love the slight amount of play when riding. You can't even tell that you're feet are clipped in sometimes, which may be a good or bad thing depending on how you look at it. It's very easy to get in and out of compared to the spring loaded Shimano's.

    I definitely felt more confident riding with the Candy's knowing I could get in and out more easily. Anyhow, see if you can try out a friends or a LBS's and compare the two. I personally would go for the Candy's.

  8. #8
    ZIP
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    Wide feet

    Quote Originally Posted by bbgobie
    Thx guys, sounds good so far.
    If I could only find a place to try on shoes locally that aren't over $150....
    I have wide feet and a lot of those MTB shoes look really narrow.

    I also have wide feet. My first shoes were the 661 skater style and they were great. The specialized shoes also run wide.

  9. #9
    W.M.A.
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    relative newbie here as well...

    started riding end of last summer with SPD's - liked being clipped in and the benefits of it, but found them hard to clip in and out of... rode today for the 1st time with egg beaters and LOVED them... easy in easy out...

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