1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    what is pedelkick? how rear wheel hop

    as title... What is pedelkick? Can anyone explain this please, and anyone know how to do rear wheel hop backward?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Pezerinno's Avatar
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    Probably best to look up an explanation on a trials website but basically you release the back break/kick/hop simultaneously - this will no doubt sound bizarre if you haven't done it before. Before you try and pedalkick you need to know how to hop on your back wheel, to know how to hop on your back wheel you need to know how to unweight the rear end of your bike i.e bunnyhop (push down, back & up on your pedals etc).

    Most beginners when learning to pedal hop actually pedal hop backwards before they do on the spot as they push their weight too far back resulting in the bike re-centralising under you when you hop and therefore hopping backwards.

    I do sometimes use pedalkicking on very technical/rocky trails if I'm on my hardtail (I find it near impossible to do on my FS) but it may be a slightly more natural technique for me as I used to ride trials for a number of years. Also its generally not a great idea to do it with rear disc brakes as it puts a lot of stress on the frame - not designed to be pushing back on themselves (this is why most trials riders use rear HS33 rim brakes). You will probably find it quite frustrating when you start off learning but persevere and wear a helmet

  3. #3
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    go to www.mountainbike.com click on skill i saw some good stuff earlier

  4. #4
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  5. #5
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    another site.. with vids..

    www.trials-online.com

  6. #6
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    And if you want to learn this kind of stuff fast: Go Ebay and buy a 20' Trial Bike.

    I tried first on my stock MTB, then changed stem and bars. Never got bejond hoping a couple of times. But destroyed a cassette, pinch flatted, untrued my wheel, ... Bought a trial bike and was hoping all over the drive way a day later. Good tool to learn the technique fast. Transporting that to a larger bike is easy enough.

  7. #7
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    Has anyone else had the same experience as the poster above ? I have spoken to many other experienced trials riders and many seem to think that the smaller bikes dont help. Not say ing the poster above is wrong.....just want to know before I rush out and buy one.

  8. #8
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    It's a pedal, not a peddle, pedel or whatever. Repeat after me, P-E-D-A-L.

    A pedal kick consists of getting up on the rear wheel and moving the pedals in a kick-ish motion while working the brake to achieve a forward hop.

    Ryan Leech can probably explain this better than me:
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=3ZQgD_anu2k


    I've ridden both stock(26'') and mod (20'') trials bikes and honestly to me they all pedal kick the same.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Playdeep
    Has anyone else had the same experience as the poster above ? I have spoken to many other experienced trials riders and many seem to think that the smaller bikes dont help. Not say ing the poster above is wrong.....just want to know before I rush out and buy one.
    Let me clarify this: My first attempts were on an ordinary XC MTB. I could hop a bit with it - but never got to backwheel hops. Bought a 20" trials bike and was hoping on the backwheel the same afternoon.

    The magic for a beginner is the significantly shorter chain stay (20' trial versus 26' XC). Once you have the move dialed you can make it work on almost every MTB.

    I did not learn the move on a 26" trials bike. So I won't comment on if that would have been just as easy.

    I apologise for the incorrect use of the word 'stock'.
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit." - And I agree.

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